Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Got my first boat, need good advice

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    60

    Default Got my first boat, need good advice

    Just picked up an 18 ft. Klamath with a 40 evinrude. It's my first boat and I haven't got any experience out on the rivers. My main intent for it is dipnetting in the copper ( finally getting off the cliffs). Does any one have suggestions of some "must haves" that they never leave the launch without? Any suggestions are helpful, as obvious as they may seem.

  2. #2
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,060

    Default

    Life jackets, Flares, Anchor, VHF Radio, Life Jackets, a toss out life preserver with rope attached. Some type of paddle/oar or somehow to get you to shore if the motor fails, fire extingusher did I mention Life jackets? You can fall out of a boat just as easy as the cliffs espically when you are hanging over the side with a big net in the water. All it takes is a big fish to hit the net or the boat to hit a rock or it catches a current and shifts for you to go overboard. You should also have dry clothes in a dry bag or box incase of going over board. Something to start a fire with normal survival items.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    a basic tool kit / box with at least one new spark plug (pre gapped), and a spare prop. some shear pins if your outboard uses them.

  4. #4
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Soldotna AK, Eugene, OR
    Posts
    612

    Default

    An anchor with a lot of line, did he mention LIFE jackets?? Wear it. A spark plug wrench, screwdriver, small tool kit. extra gas, oil. I think the Coast Guard now requires you to have the flares on board even in fresh water, they asked me for mine last year on the Kenai. I had them.

  5. #5
    Member Deak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    155

    Default Got my first boat, need good advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Grandads338 View Post
    Just picked up an 18 ft. Klamath with a 40 evinrude. It's my first boat and I haven't got any experience out on the rivers. My main intent for it is dipnetting in the copper ( finally getting off the cliffs).
    If its your first boat and you don't have river experience stay away from Copper River for awhile. Get a feel for how the boat handles on a lake and then on some of the more forgiving rivers before even thinking about taking the new boat on the Copper River.

    After the life jackets I would say a river anchor is probably the next important safety item(IMHO.) If your motor dies in a swift moving river you need to gain control of the boat.

  6. #6

    Default

    I would recommend using the time over the winter to take a boating safety class. This is the single biggest action one can take from becoming a statistic.

  7. #7
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    FLOAT COAT or FLOAT VEST and ALWAYS wear it on the boat. That Copper is a killer river take the advise and spend a season learning about running the boat and getting used to how it behaves in different currents and waves. One more thing! have fun !!

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    60

    Default Got my first boat, need good advice

    Great! I'll get some life jackets for sure, I planned on keeping extra since I'll require anyone who rides along to wear one. I hadn't thought about a safety course, anybody got any info on that, especially one that covers VHF use, I have no experience with that. Thanks everyone!

  9. #9
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    For starters http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/boating/waterws1.htm

    http://cgauxalaska.org/Public%20Education.html Scroll down and you'll see a class on Boating Skills and Seamanship coarse starting in about a week.

    You'll notice that most of the classes are earlier in the spring and summer. You could also message AKboatingsafety on this forum and inquire.

  10. #10

    Default oars

    Fit the boat with a set of whitewater raft oar locks & get a decent set of 10 ft oars ($300 new).
    I have ferried my 20ft Wooldridge across rivers so I think it can be done with your boat.
    You want the oar locks mounted near the center of waterline as the boat sits in the water.

    A paddle is basicially useless accept to push off of rocks & logs as you float up on them if you lose your engine.
    With a set of oars you can row that boat like the big rafts if you ever lose power.

    Your basic choice for oars is which way you want the boat pointed when you row it.
    If the bow is pointed downstream you have a chance to ride over or slide around a log or rock.
    If the bow is pointed upstream you have an easier time holding your place in the moving water.

    Practice a few times in moving water to get the feel of your boat with the oars.

  11. #11
    Member tzieli22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Eagle River AK
    Posts
    589

    Default

    Since this your first boat, you need a lot. Most importantly as the others say, "life jackets". Safety gear, flares, etc. VHF is always good. Spare lower unit, if its a 40 hp, then it should be a prop, if not, your under powered for a jet. I would caution running rivers with a prop. I've been doing it for over 30 years and I still wonder if I know enough. And get a good GPS. Don't rely on it 100% but they are helpful and worth every penny.

    But the best advice I can offer is find 2 or 3 people (or more) you can follow or pay there fuel for a ride to learn running rivers. If you want to run the Sue from the deska landing down river i'de be happy to show you what I've learned. Good luck, and be safe.
    Tony

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    895

    Default

    Congrats on the new boat.

    Whew the copper. That river scares me, really. We go down the canyon every year and it is one of the highlights of the summer. That being said, we have our poop in a nice neat pile for sure.

    There are two ways to dip from a boat that I have seen. Anchoring up next to a wall (like hanging off the rocks without the hanging) and powering down stream. There are some good places above and below the canyon to do this is a boat and they are not hard to find because that is were everybody is doing it at. At the end of the Canyon, the most popular is right at the very last part before the dipnet fishery ends. The water goes from 15+ feet deep to maybe 2 feet pretty fast. We run jet boats so we have some forgiveness with the shallow water. You will need to be very careful with the prop in several areas.

    So, what do you need to do to get ready to go? First off, you need to know how to read glacial rivers. If you don't know what I mean, then you are asking for trouble down there. Next, be prepared for an engine failure. If you lose power, the river will take you someplace you don't want to be in a very big hurry. Including but not limited to sand bars, whirlpools, rock walls and other boats. I have oar locks on my current boat and also have a kicker. I start the kicker in the morning or if it has been sitting for a while to make sure it is easy to start. Bring everything you need to fix your boat, electrical, motor and your person (first aid). Cell phones don't work, sometimes you can reach HEM's by marine radio, so have one of those.

    On a lighter note. I always have an extra net and pole. We seem to break or lose one every year. I use the squarish nets from B&J with deep black netting. Aircraft aluminum poles (not the fiberglass). The gillnetting is a real PIA and not necessary. Ditch the Kenai net. It can be quite windy, so if we are camping we bring the more sturdy tents. Extra PFD and a hand throwable has already been said. We don't wear waders or hip boots in the boat so if we do go overboard, they don't fill up with sand and sink. Slickers and extra toughs work just fine. You will get all the way dirty and slimy. Have extra cloths in the car. I don't go down the river without a bottle of Johnny Walker Black, that is a must have. Not the best combo for staying alert on the river, but most beneficial when you are filleting fish for 6 hours. Bring a fillet table and set up at some of the clear water streams. It makes going up river easier without all the extra weight. I really like having a radio (see above comment about Mr. Walker). It is LOUD down there just because of the river. You don't have to be very far away from another camp before the radio is not heard at all. The copper river trip is the shake down trip for the Yukon. Usually, if we are successful there, then the boats are ready for the long trip in the fall. If there is an issue we will find it usually since the boats get pretty worked.

  13. #13
    Member alaska_pike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    big lake
    Posts
    320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grandads338 View Post
    Just picked up an 18 ft. Klamath with a 40 evinrude. It's my first boat and I haven't got any experience out on the rivers. My main intent for it is dipnetting in the copper ( finally getting off the cliffs). Does any one have suggestions of some "must haves" that they never leave the launch without? Any suggestions are helpful, as obvious as they may seem.
    i also just bought a boat at the beginning of summer,..16 ft with a 50 horse prop,.. i started out in the big su running down river between the boat launch and deshka river and beyond and found this to be a deep and easy river to read and i would definitely reccomend a couple starter trips there,.. by mid summer i was on the copper river dipnetting and i did not have too much trouble but i would reccomend launching at obrians creek and not the bridge. i think you may have to pay a fee to launch at obrians but i found that with a prop it is a little sketch getting back up the last quarter mile to the bridge due to a narrow river channel

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    60

    Default Got my first boat, need good advice

    All great advice, thank you! I do have some oars that the previous owner was kind enough to leave with the boat. I'll definitely take the advice of trying some more "novice" waters for a while, and would definitely be open to the idea of paying for fuel and tagging along with some experienced river runners. Planning on getting into one of those courses for sure too.

  15. #15
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,060

    Default

    Also every life vest should a whistle tied to it somewhere. Cheap insurance they are much louder than one can yell espeically next to a fast moving river.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •