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Thread: Where to go for a custom wood stock?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default Where to go for a custom wood stock?

    I'm trying to find a reputable company to put together a full-length stock for a CZ that mimmicks the Bavarian style (or comes close) of original stock, but has less drop.

    The stock is perfect for open sights, but not ideal for a scope. I'm trying to fix this. Nobody seems to make low profile quick realease 30 mm CZ rings, so the medium height rings further compound the problem of having too much drop. Other n that, I really like the looks/feel of the stock. If I'm gonna shoot a bolt rifle, it's gotta be a traditional full length stock, I just don't find it ideal to not achieve proper cheek weld.

    Any ideas of a company that could do this?

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    BISHOP was always a good source, though I don't know if they're still out there. Try the web . . . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 2 View Post
    BISHOP was always a good source, though I don't know if they're still out there. Try the web . . . . .
    Holy smokes bishop they stopped making stocks yrs ago I mean yrs ago... What I would do put a mud buddy motor on it and man you can go up any river you want...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    I'm trying to find a reputable company to put together a full-length stock for a CZ that mimmicks the Bavarian style (or comes close) of original stock, but has less drop.

    The stock is perfect for open sights, but not ideal for a scope. I'm trying to fix this. Nobody seems to make low profile quick realease 30 mm CZ rings, so the medium height rings further compound the problem of having too much drop. Other n that, I really like the looks/feel of the stock. If I'm gonna shoot a bolt rifle, it's gotta be a traditional full length stock, I just don't find it ideal to not achieve proper cheek weld.

    Any ideas of a company that could do this?
    Try this outfit out the owner likes drinking tab soda...
    yukonfreightworks.com

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    I don't know how much woodworking you want to do, but you can order some nice wood in the right shape from richwood. Maybe one of the local guys can fit it for you if you don't want to do it yourself.
    BEE

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    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    Try this outfit out the owner likes drinking tab soda...
    yukonfreightworks.com
    good grief.....not that guy. That's just a purchased domain name with a website "under construction".

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    Try Roger Brophy. Brophy's Gunshop 745-2969 out Knik River Road. He is an old school gunsmith.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    I'm trying to find a reputable company to put together a full-length stock for a CZ that mimmicks the Bavarian style (or comes close) of original stock, but has less drop.

    The stock is perfect for open sights, but not ideal for a scope. I'm trying to fix this. Nobody seems to make low profile quick realease 30 mm CZ rings, so the medium height rings further compound the problem of having too much drop. Other n that, I really like the looks/feel of the stock. If I'm gonna shoot a bolt rifle, it's gotta be a traditional full length stock, I just don't find it ideal to not achieve proper cheek weld.

    Any ideas of a company that could do this?
    Well . . . I got a brother in-law in Arizona that does custom stocks on 5 axis CNC mills for very high end customs. He isn’t usually cheap at all, I was with him a couple months ago when a blank came in and he paid $1300 just for the dang wood blank. Takes about 4 hours machine time to cut most of his high end ones but he tells me he is thinking about selling some 90% stocks to busy the machine. If ya think it may be a marketable pattern for him I could see if he’s interested and hook you and he up for a prototype from cheaper wood maybe.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    This looks good and alot cheaper to solve the problem.
    http://www.fulton-armory.com/leathercheekpiece.aspx
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Talked a buddy about this he threw some things out there. He said try these guys for rings they make low rings for the cz. He said some of the best rings he has seen, rate with talley etc.
    http://www.alaskaarmsllc.com/

    He also said these folks can take your existing stock and change it to your dimensions and turn a new stock for you.
    Http://www.canyoncreekgunstocks.com/

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    I have no experience with this man, a buddy has, and liked his services.

    http://tripleriver.net/

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    Thanks folks! I'm going to check into those low quick detach 30 mm rings, good find 323. I'm just hoping the bolt will clear the overly large magnification ring of the scope with the lower rings. Likewise, I'll call some of the stock makers about pricing.

    Amigo, I did get a comb raiser as a temporary fix, I'm just thinking out loud about the possibility of an identical stock, but with less drop.

    You can see in the picture, the drop is just too much for a solid cheek weld. This is my ONLY complaint though. Hope I can figure out something in time for spring grizzly.

    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Mike I have installed these on shotguns and one cape gun and they will wotk for you also.If I can do it you can for sure.
    http://www.graco-corp.com/products/i...ation-hardware
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    well heck, it'd be cheaper. It would look a bit bizarre, but probably worth it. I've gotta get my hands on a set of those Alaskan-made cz rings too. I may hack the stock up.

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    Mainer some more options my buddy tossed out there. This is what he said..

    One option for the stock is to have it "bent". It costs a couple hundred to have a stock professionally bent but it could get rid of quite a bit of the drop and still keep the lines and original stock.

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    Looking the rifle over, just a half inch upward bend, and a drop of the scope via Alaskan-made low profile rings would definitely work. As suspected, I chatted with the kind gentleman about his well crafted rings, and I will indeed have to take a slight bit of metal off the bolt handle.

    323, do you know of a gunsmith who does stock bending? I found this with a simple search.....might be possible from home.

    Gunsmith Mike Orlen:
    "Of all the ancient procedures employed by the double gun gunsmith, perhaps the one most veiled in mystery is stock bending. Just the mention of bending a buttstock conjures up images of nineteenth century European master gunmakers brewing a secret mixture of heated oils and applying them to the wrist of a shotgun stock in such a way as to turn the walnut temporarily to “rubber”. These ancient craftsmen seem to share a place in our imagination with alchemists and wizards. Well, let me assure you that stock bending is neither black art nor is it rocket science. With the proper equipment, a bit of instruction and a fair amount of practice, this procedure can be safely and successfully done by the modern gunsmith, and once the buttstock has been moved to its new position, the bend is permanent.

    First, you are going to need a setting table. This is the fixture that is used to clamp the gun in place, measure its drop and cast, and bend its stock. I won’t bother to provide a measured drawing of this fixture, since you will see by the photographs that the setting table is a very simple device and its design can be altered to fit the storage and workroom requirements of any gunshop. My table is 48” long and 12” wide. The bending cage has an opening of approximately 8” wide by 11” high. There is a milled channel running down three quarters of the table length that is 1/2” deep and 1/2” wide. This channel is for the barrel‘s rib. The table was made of maple to insure its strength and stability. The shotgun is mounted on the table upside down and is securely clamped to the table by both the barrel and the receiver. Bending is accomplished either by the use of clamps pulling the buttstock toward the side of the bending cage or by hand screws pushing the stock away from the cage.

    The setting table can also house the heat source. For this, two 250 watt infrared heat lamps are used. Arms and pivots can be built to locate and hold the heat lamps, or “off the shelf” desk lamps can be used. In either case, be sure to use lamps with ceramic fixtures to insure that they can withstand the heat of the infrared bulbs. You might want your lamps separate from the setting table, but I have found that mounting them on the table simplifies storage of the setting fixture when it is not in use. The accompanying photographs show three different setting tables with three different methods of lamp attachment.
    In addition to the infrared heat source, most gunsmiths like to apply oil to the hand of the stock being bent. This can be applied simply by dampening a shop rag with the oil and wetting the stock with the rag every five minutes or so while the lamps are on. If you happen to be bending an old and well oiled buttstock, this might not be necessary, but oil is very helpful in heating the hand area of the stock and seems to make the job of stock bending much quicker and easier.

    In choosing an oil to use in stock bending, it is important to consider a few factors. The function of the oil is to add the efficiency of conduction to the infrared radiation used in bringing the gunstock up to a proper working temperature. You are not looking for penetration of the wood, nor is the oil being used to add to the finish of the gunstock; almost any oil could be used. Once after reading an article about stock bending, I decided to email its author (Michael McIntosh) and ask him what oil he and gunsmith David Trevallion used. He had referred to the oil as a “secret blend” and of course I wondered what that might be. To level the field, I divulged my “secret blend” (Canola oil). Admitting that cooking oil would no doubt work, he suggested that olive oil might make the gunshop smell a good deal better. One popular choice is mineral oil. It is very stable and has a very high smoke point. Many gunsmiths still choose to use the traditional boiled linseed oil. This works well, but it has an unpleasant odor and it tends to harden as it dries. This can make it difficult to clean out of both checkering and the inside of a shotgun receiver (if it should find its way in). Canola oil is inexpensive, has a relatively high smoke point and its odor has the slight hint of French fries. The high smoke point of Canola oil is an important factor. If you ask any chef, they will tell you that peanut oil and Canola oil smoke points are much higher that other oils used in food preparation. That is why these oils are used so often to fry foods. You do not want to exceed the oil‘s smoke point in stock bending, since this would no doubt add an unpleasant color to the heated area. Also keep in mind that mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated oils go bad. Do not try to reuse these oils and be sure to clean all surfaces and shop rags that are used.

    Once your setting table and its heat source have been built, you are ready to bend your first buttstock. I try not to get involved in the fitting of a gun stock to its owner. There are many experienced teachers and stock fitters who provide this service; they can be found through high end gun shops or at any sporting clays teaching facility. When it is determined exactly which way and how far a buttstock needs to be bent, the first step taken by the gunsmith should be a thorough inspection of the stock and its fit to the receiver. Examine the hand area very carefully for any cracks or evidence of cracks that have been repaired. You must remember that the heat required to bend a buttstock is nearly the same amount of heat required to soften any glue that might have been used to repair a crack at the wrist. Be sure to remove the trigger guard to inspect the wood beneath it. You will want to keep the trigger guard aside during the bending process. This will allow you to fill the guard screw holes with oil. Observing the bubbling oil in the trigger guard screw holes will let you know when you have heated the shotgun‘s wrist all the way to its center. It is also a good idea to check that the barrels are “on face” before the stock is bent. If they are not, this condition should be corrected first. Tighten all stock screws, especially those connecting the upper tang to the trigger plate. Often, you will run into older gunstocks that have shrunk a bit. You will no doubt need to shim both the upper tang and the trigger plate to compensate for the wood shrinkage. If you don’t, you risk altering the often critical safety to trigger distance. Once you are sure that the stock is tight and that it has no defects, lay its rib in the channel of your setting table and clamp the shotgun down tightly. Wipe the checkered area of the wrist with oil and turn on your infrared lamps. 250 watt infrared lamps (red, as opposed to white light lamps) are best placed 9” to 11” from the wood. Do not be tempted to move them closer or you risk charring the surface of the buttstock or damaging its finish. Once the stock has been heated for just over 30 minutes, you can begin to bend. Measurements are taken from the base of the setting table to the heel of the stock to determine its drop, or from the side of the bending cage to the stock to determine its cast (off or on). Carefully apply pressure with either hand screws or QuickClamps to bring the stock to its desired position. This should be a slow and deliberate procedure, being sure not to move a stock that requires excessive force. Once the stock has been moved to the desired position, you must move it a bit more to allow for spring back. This additional movement might be as much as 60% of the desired bend. With the clamps in place, continue to heat the stock for another 20 minutes or so. This additional heating soak tends to lessen the spring back that will happen when you remove the clamps. Shut off the lamps and let the stock cool for several hours. Once the stock is cooled, remove the clamps carefully and measure the result.

    Whatever spring back is going to occur will happen shortly after the clamps are removed.

    Replace the trigger guard and clean the shotgun thoroughly to remove all traces of oil. If you have had to tighten the upper tang screw and trigger plate screw, the gun should be test fired with special attention paid to the function of the safety and barrel selector (if so equipped).

    You are going to find that some gunstocks bend much more easily than others. American Black Walnut cannot be bent as easily or as far as English or European walnuts. I have seen some American Walnut stocks that simply would not bend and some English Walnut stocks that bent so well that drastic changes in drop (up to 1”) were easily done with little if any spring back. When a large change in drop is required, I often like to do it in two sessions with a few days between. This may be just superstition, but doing half of the bend at a time seems to make the process easier and lessens the spring back.

    Shotguns with through bolts attaching them to the receiver and shotguns with full pistol grips can also be bent. They may require a bit of additional heating time and a bit more effort, but they will move and they will stay bent.
    Late nineteenth and early twentieth century double barreled shotguns were typically made with a great deal of drop at heel and little (if any) cast. With the addition of a setting table to your gun shop, you will be adding a profitable service that will allow your customers to custom fit many older shotguns to both their physical size and their shooting styles.

    Here, gunsmith John Britt measures the drop at heel prior to bending.

    Here, a back action hammer gun is haveing its drop decreased by use of QuickClamps. When it has been moved to the desired position, it will be left in the fixture to cool.

    This setting table was built out of maple and the infrared lamps have been mounted with “off the shelf” fixtures. The milled channel running down its center is 1/2” wide and 1/2” deep. This will place the shotgun‘s rib below the surface of the table. As you can see, this is a very simple device.

    2 1/4” drop at heel. This beautiful sidelock shotgun will now fit its owner perfectly.

    Heat lamps have been built into this setting table and hand screws are used to move the heated buttstock to the desired position. The measuring device at the hell is used to determine drop."

    Saw a video too:
    <strong>

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    Is that the 9.3? I know we all want what we want, but have you considered just using the iron sights? I have one of these in 30-06 and find after having Wild West replace the front bead with a red one, the gun is pretty accurate as is and love shooting it. Really would love one in 9.3 but again with just the iron sights.

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    Yes, it is indeed the 9.3. I hunted an entire season with open sights. Used to be able to get 3 in groups at 100 yds with it, one shot prone, one shot kneeling, and one shot off hand. I already have the scope for it, might as well make it fit. Even with the open sights, there's still room to spare. There's just too much drop.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Mike Orlen is top notch with outstanding work at a very fair price.He has done some great shotgun work for me. He is always well spoke of on Doublegunshop.com and he treats everyones gun the same be it a fifty grand H&H or opening choke on your Stevens 311. Of course he will also tell you there is always a slite risk bending stocks.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    Holy smokes bishop they stopped making stocks yrs ago I mean yrs ago... What I would do put a mud buddy motor on it and man you can go up any river you want...
    Goodness me - - - - - guess I'm older than I thought !!!

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