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Thread: Ninilchik question

  1. #1
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    Default Ninilchik question

    I was wondering if there is anywhere close (with-in 20 miles) of Ninilchik that a fly fisherman could catch some fish this weekend. I will be in Ninilchik this weekend with the family, and I will be able to get away for about 3 hours. A species, creek and bait would be great.
    I have checked the tide chart for clam digging and it shows that the minus tide is + one foot. Can I still dig a few clams with this tide?
    I will be happy to give you two Grayling hot spots in Fairbanks if you so desire. I would spend a day fishing with you as well if you desired also.
    THANKS, Rod

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    doubt that you could dig much for clams need at least a minus1 not a plus 1. the only fly fishing i could think of would be Kasilof river, been awhile since i have fished it but there are/used to be some spring steelies there, probably a little early, maybe not. please check the regs as i do not remember what they are for this time of year there.

  3. #3

    Talking

    Kasilof river is open for catch and release for Steelies (do not remove from water) and for retenion of Kings, if your that lucky this early. Oh yah, below the highway bridge.
    Frank
    Alaska Wildrose Charters and Cabins
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    it is definitely not too early for steelhead on the kasilof, but it's pretty tough fishing at times... the steelhead isn't what it use to be when they use to stock the heck out of that river. you could also fish some of the lakes in the kasilof area (i.e. johnson) for trout - if the ice is out on the edges it should be good, but i'm not sure if the lakes in the area are still frozen or not. The kenai has some decent trout fishing right now (closes May 1st), but it's probably a bit farther than you want to go. Options are really limited at the moment - good luck.
    Oh, and I think a plus one tide is still plenty clammable, but you can expect to have a shorter period of time where the clammy areas are exposed, and not as much clammy territory exposed... still worth going though in my opinion. you probably won't get a limit (60!) but it'd still be fun if the weather cooperates.
    www.akfishology.com

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    Wink Thanks for the responses

    Thanks to all that responded. I will be headed out tomorrow morning. I believe I will try for some Steelhead on the Kasilhof on Saturday. Thanks again guys. Anyone who replied that would like the Grayling honeyholes, PM me and I will send you the info.

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    Exclamation

    As for the kasilof spring fishery ... leave the poor spawners alone A travesty of a fishery targeting downriver fish. Weak fish trying to get back to salt and recover from the rigors of spawning ... there's a reason why in areas where people encounter steelhead going up and down during certain times of the year that you're asked "any good fish"?

    Flame away , but it needed to be pointed out for those that don't know the difference

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    Amen Brother Amen!

    Ditto for targeting downrunners on the Anchor, Ninilchik and Deep Creek during the spring king openers.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    Thumbs up Point taken. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ball - Piscatorial Pursuits View Post
    ... leave the poor spawners alone
    No flame, Bob, but how do you and fishNdoc rationalize the plea above with playing with spawning salmon on their way up?

    By the way, I agree with you whether it's steelhead or salmon, up-running or down-running.

    Good post, good point, well said . . .


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    Did anyone else see that coming? LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ball - Piscatorial Pursuits View Post
    As for the kasilof spring fishery ... leave the poor spawners alone A travesty of a fishery targeting downriver fish. Weak fish trying to get back to salt and recover from the rigors of spawning ... there's a reason why in areas where people encounter steelhead going up and down during certain times of the year that you're asked "any good fish"?

    Flame away , but it needed to be pointed out for those that don't know the difference
    Good information for people like me who are unfamiliar with trout/salmon fishing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    No flame, Bob, but how do you and fishNdoc rationalize the plea above with playing with spawning salmon on their way up?

    By the way, I agree with you whether it's steelhead or salmon, up-running or down-running.

    Good post, good point, well said . . .
    Well from a biological viewpoint a pre-spawning fish, depending on time to spawning, has body fat, is in better condition, and can handle some stress. So a fish that has just entered freshwater may be better able to handle some stress ( note coho do not handle stress well in the transition from salt to fresh but after in the stream awhile harden up).

    Post spawning fish have depleted their resources and are very vulerable to additional stress. Most steelhead die after first spawning for a reason. However, the few that are headed downstream should be left alone - they paid their dues.

    Hope this answers your question Marcus.

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    Red face Disclaimer. . .

    Good grief . . . I probably should have prefaced my tongue-in-cheek, rhetorical question to Bob with some kind of disclaimer. . . never thought anyone would take it seriously. . .

    Sorry, Bob. . . hope you have a good season. You too, Francis.


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    If i'm not mistaken, I believe ALL Kasilof steelhead are of hatchery origin??? If I am correct and if this is case, then I could care less if they get harassed. If I'm wrong, then I take it all back.
    www.akfishology.com

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    Default i don't get it?

    when should we fish for them. bla bla bla don't fish for them onthe way cause they are going to spawn......bla bla bla don't fish fort them on the way down cause they just spawned. Man! They are fish! as long as you are following the rules set forth in the reg I say go for it. certinly if you are planning to catch and release. They are fish...they are either getting ready to or just have spawned there whole life. That is what fish do.

    Enjoy yourself and try to catch some fish is what I say.

  15. #15
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    Wink

    Unfortunatley, that line of reasoning leads to fishing for fish that suffer extremely high mortality ... regardless of your intentions of keeping or releasing.

    Yes, they're just a fish, but part of being an angler is having the ethics to know when you're way over the line in your actions.

    Purposely fishing for kelts is hardly on the edge ...

    it's WAY over the line in the vast majority of steelhead angler's minds.

    Nerka is dead on on with his description of the biological issues at stake.

    Keep in mind that only a small percentage of steelhead are able to make a second or third spawning run because of the rigors they go through ... especially so in the case of the Kasilof fish in the maount of time they spend in-river.

    Repeat spawning females are amongst the most important members of the opulation as the fecundicity of a repeat female is normally 25-30% higher than that of a first time spawning female.

    Basically that means, they are more productive spawners

    One of the reasons steelhead management has been so difficult in a great number of areas is because of the fact they are not semalparous like salmon ... the abilty to spawn more than once and the great variation in life histories makes modeling these populations very difficult in many cases.

    Fish for them in the fall when they're able to recover, as steelhead mortality with proper care and angling methods is extremely low ... but when many are on their last legs of survival and trying to gobble up any sort of possible food they can find on their way out to nourish their starved bodies ... let them be

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    Well said Mr. Ball.

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    Sorry Mark ... missed your post. No they are not. There have been steelhead returning to the basin long before enhancement projects of years past (no longer planted).

    Bios are just starting to learn the true range of these fish in the system, they have been surprised at some of the data they've come across: some of these travel well into the headwaters above Tustumena as well as as your lower tribs (Crooked Creek).

    I don't have actual numbers handy, but in speaking with the head drainage bio, the upper trib numbers were actually pretty surprising to not only them, but myself as well.

    There's a good chance that the cluster of spawning activity just above the highway is a result of the enhancement project as this is apparently a fairly new region for the fish to stage and utilize.

    Ther has been little study in the past on these fish, so we have to rely somewhat on anecdotal evidence, but that's certainly better than nothing ... and in some cases probably ought to be looked at ever more closely in situations where hard facts are not available to get historical population data.

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    thanks for the info bob... i was unaware that steelhead were historically found in the basin; i always assumed the hatchery was more than a supplement to the steelhead population, but rather a species introduction. i guess that's what you get when you assume, but i never really targeted the steelhead there anyway, so never thought to research their history. all steelhead i have caught on the kasilof were as a result of bi-catch while targeting kings. i remember 15 years ago, we use to catch LOTS of steelhead on small plugs during the early king season (late may), but ever since they stopped stocking them i only catch one or two a year. i do target steelhead on the anchor quite often in sept/oct, but never really enjoyed catching the snakey steel of the kasilof.
    anyways, thanks for the education
    Mark W.
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

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