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Thread: fishing without bears

  1. #1
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    Default fishing without bears

    Hi, I am planning 1 week fishing trip to Alaska. Probably it is going to be kind of "near highways fishing". But I don't want to see any bears at least during my fishing . Is it possible ? What is the best "near highways" rivers/creeks without bears ?

  2. #2

    Default

    Personally, I don't know of any rivers or creeks that can't or don't have bears at one time or another. I'd say your best bet is Ship Creek in downtown Anchorage.

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default homer fishing lagoon

    never seen a bear there <grin>.
    (but a little blackie did swim out to the spit a few years ago...made it about to the barge basin before the troopers DLP'd it).

    but seriously, why would you think you can fish off the road system and be sure NOT to see a bear?

    perhaps you should rethink your priorities...is it "no bears" or "fishing in alaska"?

    they just don't go together....try the florida keys....
    Last edited by homerdave; 04-26-2007 at 09:40.
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    Default chance of seeing a bear is low

    There are lots of fishing spots that reduce the chance of a bear encounter. You guys are too tough on the person requesting information.

    A prime spot for people who are nervous around bears is the lower Kenai River for sockeye salmon in mid to late July. Other spots include the Anchor or Ninilchik Rivers on weekends in June - lots of people and good chinook fishing. The lower Anchor River in the fall for silvers and steelhead. Some of the road side Sustina streams have lots of fisherman and bear encounters are low near the highway crossings. This year is an odd year but on even years the lower Kenai River is great for pink salmon.

    Crooked Creek which enters the Kasilof River (area that is open is in the Kasilof not the mainstem Creek - see regulations) is great for shorebased chinook fishing in mid May into late June.

    Rainbow trout fishing in the Kenai River from Sterling downstream is good for rainbow trout.

    So there are lots of places to fish where the chance of seeing a bear is almost zero.

    What I would do is arrive in Alaska and go over to ADF&G office in Anchorage or drive down to Soldotna and visit their office and talk to the local biologist. They can steer you to the best spot at the time and are glad to do it.

    As a final note you can hire a guide for a small amount of money relative to your total trip cost and fish for good rainbows in the Upper Kenai or chinook, sockeye, or silver salmon in the Kenai depending on when you get here and what you want to target. -- Good luck and have a great trip.

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    I 'll be fishing alone and just think that it can be dangerous (?). That's why I want to minimize risk - at least go to those "near highways" rivers/creeks which have a minimal bears population

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    Default no problem

    You can do that without any problem. When are you coming?

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    Thank you, for detailed information. My schedule for this trip is : July, 27 -
    August, 4. But if you suggest a better time I 'll consider it too.

  8. #8

    Default No bears

    Just as a suggestion: It might be better, if you haven't been here before, to get someone to go with you. It is Alaska, there are potentially bears, and I always feel that if you are in an area, especially wild, that you don't go alone the first time.
    On another note, this is Alaska, and it's the bears that partly make it what it is, an immense, beautifully wild place. Perhaps seeing bears can be a tremendous experience, not necessarily a bad one. Fear will sometimes defeat you before you start. Just my 2 cents, meant in an amiable way.

  9. #9

    Default Don't worry about it.

    I have fished hundreds and hundreds of hours on Alaska fishing streams and very seldom do I see bears. I do plan to eventually get a carry gun, but I still do not carry any bear protection at all.

    That said, Nerka's suggestion of checking with ADFG before going out is a very good one. They will tell you of places where there have been recent bear problems. Stay away from those areas.

    There are a few areas where there is a very good chance of running into bears and ADFG will tell you about them. Otherwise, don't worry about it. Bearmania is real and it is just that...a mania.

    That is not to guarantee that you won't see a bear. But you probably won't see one when you are fishing, and even if you do see one while fishing, it most likely won't be a problem. Even if it does become a problem it will most likely eat the other guy :-) Don't worry about it!!
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    Default Avoiding bears

    I think what you want to consider is avoiding brown and Kodiak bears. Black bears usually run the other way when they see you, Stay off the mainland and avoid the A,B,C islands and Kodiak: Admiralty, Baranoff and Chichikoff (sp). Petersburg Blind Slough is a good bet. Prince of Wales Island, to my knowledge does not have brown bears. Kuiu has some great fishing with only black bears.

  11. #11
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default POW

    Correct, no brownies on POW.

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    Default you likely will not be alone

    Quote Originally Posted by boston1971 View Post
    I 'll be fishing alone and just think that it can be dangerous (?). That's why I want to minimize risk - at least go to those "near highways" rivers/creeks which have a minimal bears population

    Chances are good that if you are fishing those "near highways" river/creeks for salmon, you will not be fishing alone. I wish that were the case. Still a blast though, you'll have a good time!

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    Default

    Go pretty much anywhere and make lots of noise. I've fished Alaska for 15 years and I've only seen 5 bears while fishing, 4 of those were on the Russian and were just Blackies, 1 was a grizz on the talachuitna.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  14. #14
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    boston 1971
    The whole bear issue is way overblown don't sweat it. You'll be fishing near other people and bear attacks are really rare. They are usually do to someone being stupid and ignoring the general safety rules. I see unarmed folks on the river all the time and they do just fine. Besides there are few sights more majestic than a big bruin in his home habitat.

  15. #15
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default no bears? no fish...

    This is just my two cents worth, based on countless days of fishing Mat Valley and Kenai streams. Likelihood of seeing a bear increases in direct relation to the distance hiked from the parking lot- every stream in the Mat-Su Valley and Kenai with salmon in it will have bears visiting it to do the same thing you want to do- catch fish. They're not there to eat unwary fishermen, but to pack on fat for winter by catching and eating as many salmon as they can. The problem occurs when someone interrupts that pursuit, and catches that bear at just the wrong moment. These moments are extremely rare; if you consider the millions of hours spent fishing in Alaska each summer, and find less than a handful of bears killed in self defense (by a fisherman, and I think the average is less than one fisherman a year is mauled in Alaska,) your odds of a bad run in with a bear are extremely low. If you're roadside angling, you can wade up or down river on a lot of streams and rivers and take yourself right into prime bear habitat. At the time of year you're coming, the best trout fishing on the Parks Highway will be upriver where kings are spawning, and also the highest likelihood of seeing bears. The best salmon fishing will be near the mouths, where there will also be more crowded conditions and very low probability of bear sightings, much less bear trouble. Bottom line, though, if the stream has salmon in it, there will be bears somewhere near, and there will be a chance of seeing one... the odds are higher on some streams than others, time of day, part of the stream, and what you do as you fish all are a factor in those odds.

    Its funny how sightings go, too. I went many years fishing valley streams with out ever seeing a black or brown bear. The sightings and runins increased as I fished more streams in more remote country, to two summers ago, where I ran into 7 bears in 3 days, on 4 different streams and rivers. The most nerve wracking encounter was on a popular Parks Highway stream about 1/4 mile upstream of the road... I woke up a napping teenage grizzly and had him come flying out of shoulder high grass about 10 feet away from me... fortunately he just wanted out of the country, and didn't decide to run me over on his way out of Dodge! That pretty much ended the fishing day for me on that creek... my heart just wasn't in it anymore! Then last summer I spent even more time on the water, and didn't see any bears while I was fishing. I always carry a handgun with while I fish, but have yet to use it.

    Keep doing your research, and plan your trip to catch fish. Don't sweat bears too much... there is a lot you can do to bring the already low odds of a bad encounter even lower, and don't let it ruin your fishing. Talk to the area tackle stores just before you come up, get the most recent buzz and any advice they may have for you... a couple would be Ken's Alaska Tackle in Soldotna, Gwin's Lodge in Cooper Landing, Mountainview and Worldwide Anglers in Anchorage, and 3 Rivers Fly and Tackle in Wasilla.

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