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Thread: "Alaska Time" ?

  1. #1
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    Default "Alaska Time" ?

    Guys,

    I tried to spend some time formulating my question so as not to sound unnecessarily dumb. I see several job descriptions requiring "Alaska time: in varying quantities. While I have none, if all other qualifications being met, are there any geographic substitutes?

    I live in western WA, and while we don't get a lot of snow in the winter, the WX is usually rainy, horrible and changes quickly. I hear alot of "You live in Western WA, you'll love SE Alaska!"

    I teach in a Cub, T-Craft, Stearman, T-6, etc in addition to BE-200, and a Chinook helicopter for the Army. Got lots of mountain time in Afghanistan. Have a float rating, but never used it much.

    In any case, I have goals set and just trying to prepare myself to be as marketable as possible before we decide to make a move, given I'm not a native. Other than that I have no delusions of grander, or expectations.

    Any suggestions are absolutely welcome. By the way, I check in here at least a couple of times a week to make the time here in the desert pass faster...maybe even subconsciously hide on some back strip in Denali)

    Mike-

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    Hi Mike,

    For many Alaska flight operations Alaska time can also be construed as "or equivalent." Pacific Northwest time is definitely equivalent in many respects as is mountain time. For some Alaska operators, "Alaska time" may be an insurance requirement. Most Alaska operators are looking for 1000 hours or more in a newly hired pilot. To me it sounds like with your experience, you'd have an excellent chance of being hired to fly in Alaska.
    Take a look at www.flyalaska.com

  3. #3
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    This summer I had a brother pilot from Gig Harbor WA (Don the Cub Bandit,,,nicest guy I ever met) who had to aquire 40 hours of Alaskan Float Flying time, for a new job.
    He was a 6,000 hour pilot. But for some reason the insurance company who covered the 135 outfit had this weird requirement.

    So....... we flew around in the rain and low clouds for 4 days in my little Cub until he had the required 40 hours. We also took lots of photos to prove it...
    The weather cleared just as he was boarding the ERA flight out of town....
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #4
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    You should also consider locations you're interested in talking Alaska time. A pilot here in Juneau this summer learned a fatal lesson regarding mountains and fog this summer. He was from Washington and had very little Alaska time, a short stint up near Bethel was his Alaska experience. Flying in western WA could translate fairly well to portions of Alaska, but not all.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  5. #5
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    Guys,

    Thanks for the inputs. I have no preconceived ideas about any of my experience actually substituting "time in the seat", I was just trying to gauge how far off center I may be. That said, I never get to fly anywhere either flat, or with good WX, so at least my decision making processes seem to be in tune. Of course I understand that all changes when you're dropped into a strange landscape.

    Thanks again,

    Mike-

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    Well not all of Alaska is rain and fog. Get off the coast aways and you are in a more continental climate. It gets downright hot in the summer with all the sunlight and ****ed cold in the winter when the sun abandons us. Flying in the cold is one reason why some operators want to see Alaska time. Knowing how to preheat and operate expensive aircraft in the cold is a necessary skill. In the not so distant past there was a fair amount of flying Part 135 on skiis up here in CE-185's, cubs and beavers... You can still find those type jobs, there's just a lot fewer of them. The villages all have good runways and are serviced with CE-208s and PA31-350s, some are big enough for Dash 8s and BE-1900s. Medevac Operators are running BE-200s and Lear-35s... Good Luck to you over there.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    This summer I had a brother pilot from Gig Harbor WA (Don the Cub Bandit,,,nicest guy I ever met) who had to aquire 40 hours of Alaskan Float Flying time, for a new job.
    He was a 6,000 hour pilot. But for some reason the insurance company who covered the 135 outfit had this weird requirement.

    So....... we flew around in the rain and low clouds for 4 days in my little Cub until he had the required 40 hours. We also took lots of photos to prove it...
    The weather cleared just as he was boarding the ERA flight out of town....
    If a 6,000-hour pilot still needs 40-hours in which someone thinks he'll learn something knew, that someone has been running in the sun too long . . . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by stearmann4 View Post
    Guys,

    Thanks for the inputs. I have no preconceived ideas about any of my experience actually substituting "time in the seat", I was just trying to gauge how far off center I may be. That said, I never get to fly anywhere either flat, or with good WX, so at least my decision making processes seem to be in tune. Of course I understand that all changes when you're dropped into a strange landscape.

    Thanks again,

    Mike-
    I expect you'll do just fine. Keep currente SECTIONAL CHARTS at hand . . . . .

  9. #9
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    If a 6,000-hour pilot still needs 40-hours in which someone thinks he'll learn something knew, that someone has been running in the sun too long . . . .
    Yeap made no sense to me either. He had all sorts of Part 135 time flying 206s and 207s off islands around the Great Lakes. and now a bunch of time flying small corp- jets. He was already SES rated and also had Beaver time...

    I let him stay in my guest cabin for a few nights and we went out every day and made a 10 hour day out of it. We just hauled gas cans and lunches. Don't ask about the gross weight... Cruising along one side or the other of Cook Inlet at 65 mph in the rain really gets old... Although we did find a couple of new fishing spots....
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    This summer I had a brother pilot from Gig Harbor WA (Don the Cub Bandit,,,nicest guy I ever met) who had to aquire 40 hours of Alaskan Float Flying time, for a new job.
    He was a 6,000 hour pilot. But for some reason the insurance company who covered the 135 outfit had this weird requirement.

    So....... we flew around in the rain and low clouds for 4 days in my little Cub until he had the required 40 hours. We also took lots of photos to prove it...
    The weather cleared just as he was boarding the ERA flight out of town....
    Alex,

    If it comes to that it doesn't sound like a bad option. I can think of alot worse ways to meet the requirements and brush up on my floats at the same time. I was going to put the floats on my Cub, but it's such a PITA to use em' around western WA where I live.

    Mike-

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