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Thread: The best tomato in the world

  1. #1
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    Default The best tomato in the world

    What are some great tomato varieties that other folks have liked? As a kid growing up in the Midwest, in the 70's, my dad grew the old fashioned beefsteaks, ohhh my what flavor they had. Here in Alaska I have grown tomatoes for 20 years, and have found that very few varieties of tomatos are worth eating, even the old beefsteak seemed to have changed.
    Currently, I still grow Early Girl, Celebrity, a few Big Beef and Lemon Boys, all not bad at all, not the best but worthy. What varieties have you tried that are much better than the common supermarket tomato?
    I do not like 90 percent of the Alaska outdoor varieties, minus Polar Beauty or Stupice, which are pretty good, the others are not what I'm looking for.
    In the green house I do not like Better boys, Big Boys, Fantastic, or Super Fantastic, yuck, nice cosmetics but blaaaaaand.
    Since there are so many types thought I would ask and narrow down the possibilities. No offense if your variety hit the yuck list.
    What is the best tomato in the world? (lol)

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    "Mrs. Benson" is the best tasting tomato I have ever eaten. Have grown them successfully in an interior greenhouse. Am also very fond of the black cherry tomatoes.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    We had good luck and great taste with Bulls Heart !!!!

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    Thanks . . will pass those recommendations on to my wife to try next year . .

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    This is only my 2nd year with a little green house to grow tomatoes in, but so far I'm in agreement with you on the Stupice.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    I've tired so many. like you few have good flavor.
    Early girl are my staple tomatoes. Grow well & good flavor.
    I like the sun gold for cherry tomatoes.
    4th of july for early ripening & taste similar to the early girl.

    My best experiment for a new GH tomato was this year I grew some Brandy boy from Burpee.
    Great flavor & size. a do over IMO. Was the best tasting tomato in my GH
    A little late for ripening but worth the wait.

    I grow 1 heirloom, I call it "Mom's yellow" but I think it's more common name is "Hillbilly"
    A yellow with red/orange rainbow colored meat. Good size & flavor,
    Not a high producer. I grow 1 every year & get 10 toms or so from it.

    +1, no flavor:
    "I do not like Better boys, Big Boys, Fantastic, or Super Fantastic,"

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    All of these are good for greenhouse. I don't bother with outside. I had great success with silvery fir tree (first pic). Fruit set was pretty good - the plants were fairly loaded with tasty medium sized red tomatoes with good flavor, not mealy or soft. They have pretty foliage that really stands out. I also love Black Krim (2nd pic) - on my 3rd generation. Big huge tomatoes that need staking, even the tomato stem in some cases. They are kind of soft, but taste tangy and like a real tomato out of hand or with a little salt. Make wonderful soup. Golden Nugget grows the most delicious little yellow tomatoes in big bunches without having to start your plants mid winter. Last are currant tomatoes. I picked about a gallon of these tiny tomatoes before freezup - not including the ones I ate before that. Plants are a bit huge but worth it once the prolific bunches of tiny tomatoes start to ripen.

    DSCN0065.jpgDSCN0097.jpg

  8. #8

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    I've grown mostly heirlooms in Michigan and Brandywine was my favorite. Never OVER produced...therefore I don't think it would be an acceptable variety for AK...I will be trying it in the next couple of years. To sweet to be a good canning tomato but great for BLT's and sliced side dish.

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    Default Outdoor

    For those of you who do not have a greenhouse, you can still get good tomatoes from the Stupice, or Polar Beauty. I prefer Stupice butthey are slightly tougher to grow too. However, during one of our hotter summers several years ago I got about 40 tomatoes off of one, and the taste is better than most supermarket tomatoes. All others for ouside in AK I have tried are bland. Black plastic over the ground with wire hoops for cover over plants should really increase the yields too.
    Thanks for all the info on the greenhouse favs, I am going to try 4 or 5 heirlooms this year, plus several newbies, with temp control, but keep Early Girl as main season crop. I love a good tomato, maybe I will find one again... lol

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    As of now I am going to go with Gary Ibsen. I could not believe how many varieties are offered and each one has a very detailed description, flavor, texture, etc,etc,etc. They offer a huge selection of Russian Heirlooms which stand a better chance of performing in AK than many other Heirlooms. I definately got the impression that they know a tomato, and therefore, when they say good, it's probably "the bomb." Most noteable was the selection of what they called cool climate varieties, meaning in Wisconson, Michigan, etc, but our greenhouses should make up for how far we are north. They have quit a few 55 day, or so, varieties, and a huge selection of exotic beefsteak varieties, hmmmmm mmmm made my mouth water. I picked out 15 varieties, from a wide mix, so if anyone wants to swap a few seeds let me know.

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    Default 55 dayers

    Beaverlodge Slicer, Bloody Butcher, Heirloom taste is the claim, Northern Lights- yellow orange Beefsteak, intense flavor is the claim, a market favorite at their tomatofest. There are so many others to look through it's just madness, but these are some earlies I'm trying for sure.

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    wish i liked people as much as i liked tomatoes.
    Semper Fi!

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    I am growing Red Robin (18"-24"), Tiny Tim (12"), and Micro Tom (8"-12") varieties indoors under grow lights.


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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    show me your indoor setup i might be in terested in doing this
    Semper Fi!

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    My reliable tomato which ripens outdoors is Imur Prior Beta. We got ripe tomatoes from growboxes on the deck last summer, which was very cool here in SE. In the greenhouse I've grown Stupice, Oregon Spring, Sun Sugar, with varying success. I shop for tomatoes through several catalogs; check out Tatiana's Tomato Base for a huge variety.

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    My tomato flowers are dying. I know its different down here but was wondering if you have experienced
    this and if so what is causing it. The plant is in a Topsy/Turvy upsidedown planter. It was planted about
    6 weeks ago and is healthy, lots of flowers but the oldest flowers are suddenly dying. I think
    I attached a picture
    If we all agreed....this would be no fun

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    Quote Originally Posted by tabmarine View Post
    My tomato flowers are dying. I know its different down here but was wondering if you have experienced this and if so what is causing it. The plant is in a Topsy/Turvy upsidedown planter. It was planted about
    6 weeks ago and is healthy, lots of flowers but the oldest flowers are suddenly dying.

    My wife thinks your flowers may not be pollinating and suggests you check your local greenhouse/garden supply for some pollinating spray. Also, type "tomato pollination" into Google.


    Good luck . .

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    If there are no insects for pollinating, you can use a very small paintbrush, and go from flower to flower just like a bee would do. All depending on the number of plants you have of course...wouldn't want to do this if you have a large greenhouse full of them.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Default flowers

    Marcus may be correct. You can simply walk between the rows and gently brush along the plants, and I assume you have a fan gently circulating air in your GH. This should work if thats the problem, brushing will certainly work, but I have never had to go to such extents.
    You know you have to send us up your local seeds, from your favorite variety, for this wonderful advice. Lol good luck, thats almost as bad as a sick kid, and tomatoes don't whine either.

  20. #20
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    My Son "massages" his indoor tomatoe blossoms with his electric tooth brush. I just gently shake the stalks with lots of blossoms on it that are ready to be pollinated. Both methods work quite well for us.

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