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Thread: Out of the Lake

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default Out of the Lake

    I pulled out of the lake early this year due to the weather down here in Homer. Good thing....

    I did not pump the floats before I taxiied the Cub over to the ramp. I waited until I was over inside a hangar so I could measure how much water was in the floats after a 15 days of rain, wind and waves.
    Vacumed out 8 gallons of water with my shop vac. This was from little EDO 1400s. It does not look like much when you look inside every compartment and see an inch here and there.... But it all adds up....
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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  2. #2

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    Summer must really be over...
    14 Days to Alaska
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  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Yes and it is always a very depressing time of year for me....
    I only had 17 customers this summer. I lost two more when my plane was down with a cracked cylinder and oil sump for a 10-12 day period. (she was hot-rodded during a check-ride) ....
    Now the lake is freezing and I have about 4 inches of snow up at my house.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I pulled out of the lake early this year due to the weather down here in Homer. Good thing....

    I did not pump the floats before I taxiied the Cub over to the ramp. I waited until I was over inside a hangar so I could measure how much water was in the floats after a 15 days of rain, wind and waves.
    Vacumed out 8 gallons of water with my shop vac. This was from little EDO 1400s. It does not look like much when you look inside every compartment and see an inch here and there.... But it all adds up....
    It does - - - - - and I hope there are lots of pilots who pay attention to this reminder . . .

  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Basically 66.4 pounds of water.
    And these are pretty tight floats. But water can come in around the hatches from wind and rain. Plus I did not pump them out after the last flight of the season which was a BFR with lots of plow and step taxi work...
    In a larger set of floats, you could easily exceed 100 pounds of water....

    Not to mention the damage that freezing water can do inside your floats. While in the hangar this winter I have the compartment hatches open so there will not be any condensation....
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Basically 66.4 pounds of water.
    And these are pretty tight floats. But water can come in around the hatches from wind and rain. Plus I did not pump them out after the last flight of the season which was a BFR with lots of plow and step taxi work...
    In a larger set of floats, you could easily exceed 100 pounds of water....

    Not to mention the damage that freezing water can do inside your floats. While in the hangar this winter I have the compartment hatches open so there will not be any condensation....
    Question for you: do you use Peral-Ketone inside your floats? I've always sprayed mine inside, and then brushed on more at the seams. Keeps 'em pretty dry, but I still pump them out before every flight.

  7. #7
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    For the last few years I have been using Gluvit, which is made for boats. It is basically a two part expoxy that is thin for the first hour or two. My wife and I brushed it on and then pressured the leaky compartment with a reverse shop vac for a few minutes to get it into any bad rivet holes. The down side is that it is a big pain in the butt to remove.
    I only have it in a couple bad compartments.

    Back when I painted the floats I used two part epoxy boat bottom paint and had a suction in the compartmemts to suck-in any paint that was over a bad rivet. It has held pretty good for a few years.

    For the bolt holes around the bumpers, and around the spreader bars,,, I used 5200 Marine calk and adhesive, which I cut (thinned) with laquer thinner. It was easy to blow or suck into holes and once the thinner evaporates it dries pretty nicely.

    My original float bumpers had a plywood base that would rot. I made new bases from the black nylon cutting board type material. I counter sunk the bolts and epoxied them in place..
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    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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