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Thread: Too Early to Call Coyotes?

  1. #1
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    Default Too Early to Call Coyotes?

    Is it too early to start calling coyotes if I want to keep the hides?

    I actually SAW one last weekend, he ran out in the road in front of me and then trotting along, turning back to smile at me...

    With the snow were getting, i'm guessing bear hunting is over and i'm itching to try my new FoxPro Wildfire!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I'm not so sure that bear hunting is over, but...

    Coyote hides should be getting decent by this time, and will only get better over the next month or two. I took a really nice one in mid-November a couple years ago, and that's really not so far off. That being said, using a predator call right now carries with it the very real possibility of calling in a bear - possibly a brown one that you're not legally allowed to shoot. On the Kenai, I'd personally wait a couple of weeks before breaking out the call.

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    Thanks Brian, I was planning on making one more bear trip this weekend either way, but I thought about bringing the call along in case I get chased out of the mountains by snow again.

    Made a climb for a bear last weekend only to have snow move in on us and totally ruin visibility after about 2 hours of hiking/climbing!

    i'll be sure and have a well armed partner along if we decide to call!

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    I was driving back from valdez a couple weeks ago and saw a coyote walking on the other side of a lake abot a mile off the road.. I pulled over, got the call and seen if he would respond.. took a bit, but about 30 minutes later he was sitting 130 yards broadside... My daughter missed and he hauled butt.. His fur seemed to be pretty nice...

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    I haven't shot a coyote this early in the season, but have seen them around the Delta area in the past. Their fur appeared to be in pretty good shape, but it's a tough call from a distance. By mid November, they should be prime. I've shot a couple fox this early in the season and they were in good shape, so if that's any indication of coyote fur, you could probably start shooting them. Good luck.

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    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    I will be up on the Denali sat waiting for caribou to open Sunday so my kids can try and fill the tags they drew, fox are going to die sat. .

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    Sure appreciate all the input, I was going to give it a whirl close to town tonight but mother nature insisted I put my snow tires on and tomorrow is the Seahawk game so it'll be this weekend before I try.

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    Its never too early to shoot coyotes.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bsj425 View Post
    Its never too early to shoot coyotes.

    keep the hide, or don't.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I shot one with my bow in late October a couple of years ago. The hide was way blue and the fur far from prime. Priming up has nothing to do with temps, it has to do with the length of daylight.

    That said, I agree with Bsj and taiga, never a bad time to take one. They will never be depleted and they displace fox, etc..

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    I shot a fox in late october in unit 13 before and he looked prime... but when we skinned him out, his hide was pretty blue. his fur was ready for winter, but not his skin it was my first fox so i had him tanned and now hes hanging on my wall. to my surprise, once tanned, i couldnt tell the diffrence between one i shot in december, and the one in october! theres an obvious point where there hides are not worth it, but its all about personal preference this time of year. good luck on the preds this winter guys!Click image for larger version. 

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    I wasn't exactly predator hunting, but I was blessed and shot these three wolves list past hunting season in September while I was moose hunting. My wife and I tanned them ourselves at home. I was real pleased with the results. The hides seemed like they were in good condition. I would imagine coyotes would be real similar.




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    Thats awesome Buschwack Jack! What tanning method did you guys use? I'm planning to tan my own coyotes when the time comes!

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    Quote Originally Posted by limon32 View Post
    Thats awesome Buschwack Jack! What tanning method did you guys use? I'm planning to tan my own coyotes when the time comes!
    Thanks. It was actually pretty painless. I bought a couple tanning kits at Sportsman's Warehouse. Basically you salt and stretch it first. Then you apply the tanning paste overnight. After that you scrape off the tanning paste and oil the hide and let it dry. Once it is dry you scrape it with a tool that comes with the kit and sand it down. The last step is to clean the fur with corn meal. The whole process takes about a week from start to finish. It's not that hard. Now if you are planning to sell the hide you might want to have it commercially tanned. But I just wanted to hang them up in my house. So it worked good enough for me.

    Oh yeah, I forgot to tell you. You have to brush the hide to get all the tangles out. I forgot that step because that was what my wife did. She did an excellent job I thought. She also sewed up a massive hole in one of the hides that I blasted with my 338. After the repair you can't even tell where the hole was. She sewed it up before we applied the tanning paste and oil. Dental floss works good to sew up the holes.

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    That is just too cool, Jack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Thanks. It was actually pretty painless. I bought a couple tanning kits at Sportsman's Warehouse. Basically you salt and stretch it first. Then you apply the tanning paste overnight. After that you scrape off the tanning paste and oil the hide and let it dry. Once it is dry you scrape it with a tool that comes with the kit and sand it down. The last step is to clean the fur with corn meal. The whole process takes about a week from start to finish. It's not that hard. Now if you are planning to sell the hide you might want to have it commercially tanned. But I just wanted to hang them up in my house. So it worked good enough for me.

    Oh yeah, I forgot to tell you. You have to brush the hide to get all the tangles out. I forgot that step because that was what my wife did. She did an excellent job I thought. She also sewed up a massive hole in one of the hides that I blasted with my 338. After the repair you can't even tell where the hole was. She sewed it up before we applied the tanning paste and oil. Dental floss works good to sew up the holes.
    I did a big batch of rabbits (20 maybe?) about 2 years ago with the ALUM recipe I found on Mother Earth News. They turned out good as far as preservation, but they are so thin they are hard to work soft. I tried saddle soap and oil, neither seemed to help much. Some day i'm going to sew them together for a wall hanger, maybe glue them to a felt backing or something.

    In any case its made me excited to try something bigger. I've been collecting squirrels and I plan to trap some ermine to try too. Thanks for the info on your experience!

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