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Thread: Shoot an animal only once mentality, why I don't like it:

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default Shoot an animal only once mentality, why I don't like it:

    When that hunting rifle bounced miles down the trail in a koplin gun boot......

    When that hunting rifle bounced round miles in a scabbard while horesback.....

    When that hunting rifle was dropped when yah took a spill.....

    When that hunting rifle bounced round while things were brittle during a cold winter hunt......

    When that hunting rifle wore a Leopold scope.... (nah just kidding)

    In my case, when the rifle rattled round while I bounced of rocks in a canoe, got dropped, fell in water, oftentimes vibrated to the bottom of the boat, and the finish of both the scope caps and the rifle stock was worn off smooth in some places.......I take a second shot when the animal doesn't immediately drop. If the second don't work and I have time (never happened yet), I'd drop the scope for open sights with the quick release scope rings.

    Just thinkin ouhlowd. What yah's think of the "shoot only once mentality"? Sure do like dead moosey right beside the creek instead of 30 yds in thick alders/willows even though the shot was opined to be "perfect"

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    I think the African PHs call it "admiring the shot." The story is that too many American clients take the shot and then wait for a reaction instead of immediately chambering a new round and pumping another into the animal if it doesn't drop. I think you're right on.

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    I'd call it smart shootin'.

    Good plan unless that darn first shot drops'm directly into that waist high grass (creek side) in which situation its really hard to find fur in the crosshairs for shot 2. ;-)

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Yip, you n the boy have been blessed with those shots where one bullet meets bone that holds a spinal cord. Lucky fellas.......critters disappeared before the recoil has even settled down for a view through the sights. Faster n a shuck of a lever or the pull of a bolt.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I think we've been so entrained to think about the "one shot kill" people will often wait and see if one will do it.

    I've been pretty fortunate that the first shot the last few years has taken my critter off it's feet or stunned it so obviously that nothing more was required.

    This year however the first had no apparent effect although a lethal hit. So I hit it again. I ended up giving it a coup de grace despite two fatal hits- sometimes these critters are more tenacious than we believe they can be.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    As my brother used to tell me when he was helping me learn to hunt: "More lead, more dead."

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    because when you belong to a team... you get more points for one shot kills... even if it takes 400 yards and leaving it there over night.. but then such is the sport of hunting...


    but Michael... i fully agree with you, shoot it till it falls down if you have too.. screw the points
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    My boss in the Army always said "shoot until it changes form", I guess old habits are hard to break. I shoot until they stop moving, you can't eat what you can't find.

    Some say it waste meat, I would rather kill as quickly as possible and not have to look for a wounded suffering animal.
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Anchor the beastie. Who's counting anyway?
    I have seen people shoot at, and myself have shot animals that had a strong will to live and needed to the be administered the coup degras after what should have been killing shots to the vitals. I recall one caribou up on the Nushagak which just would not die...

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    My boss in the Army always said "shoot until it changes form", I guess old habits are hard to break. I shoot until they stop moving, you can't eat what you can't find.

    Some say it waste meat, I would rather kill as quickly as possible and not have to look for a wounded suffering animal.
    Especially in the case of a bear...just keep shooting till it doesn't move. Seconds after the first shot is fired, there will be another round chambered and ready to shoot, like Steve said, matter of habit.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    I believe that the 'One shot, one kill' ethos was ingrained into American culture due to straight economics. Other hunting cultures don't seem to be stuck on this.
    I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

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    Traditional black powder shooters are taught, after shooting, to reload now. Don't advance, don't stalk up, don't even go inspect the obviously successful results of a first obviously-perfect shot. No. You reload right then.

    Stid, I couldn't help noticing that your reasons for taking a second shot are the same as some profess to be reasons why its important to make one shot kills when you can. I'm betting you're a fan of getting as close as you're able to before taking that first shot.

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    Default Shoot an animal only once mentality, why I don't like it:

    I know personally, I will never let another animal get the chance to take a run. Recently I knocked a nice buck dead and my hunting partner knocked down the doe that was just below him, I had it in my crosshairs, but he hit it so hard I thought it was dead, knocked smooth over. We stand up and have our obligatory "nice shot" back and forth and just as we were admiring our proficiency, the doe jumps up and bounds off. Three hours of tracking later we lost the trail and never did find her. Such a waste and a major disappointment.
    Never again.
    More lead-more dead. I like that.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post

    Stid, I couldn't help noticing that your reasons for taking a second shot are the same as some profess to be reasons why its important to make one shot kills when you can. I'm betting you're a fan of getting as close as you're able to before taking that first shot.
    You would be correct, when I decide to take a life, I feel it is my responsibility to do so as quickly and as efficiently as possible. This way of thinking has come from many years of experience, and also from some hard earned lessons.

    I will admit that I have wounded animals and either have not been able to find them or found them after they were no longer edible. Every one of those haunt me to this day and helped changed the way I hunt. I could make a variety of excuses, but it really boils down to being unwilling to wait for the best shot, or being afraid that the animal may get away. I instantly regretted taking those shoots and each time I searched for those animals until I was exhausted and unable to continue.

    I can not just live with it and have the mentality that the predators have to eat to and continue to hunt for another animal. Those lost animals haunt me, and I have vowed to honor them by not repeating the same mistakes.

    I'm now totally happy to come home with no meat as opposed to wounding an animal and not being able to kill it quickly. The mental anguish is simply too great for me.

    I pride myself in being a proficient hunter and to me that means knowing my limits and the limits of my equipment. I was taught that if you are going to do something, do it the best you can.
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    I shoot to it is down. Wether it's one shot or three. I have been lucky where most of the time one shot works.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Other than birds on the wing one shot has been what I've needed That said I chamber a new round right away but when its already down dead I've saved the bullet.I have no problem popping a second third or fourth if needed.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member wolfkiller's Avatar
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    Default Shoot an animal only once mentality, why I don't like it:

    I always kill with one shot......
    The last one.
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    I'm not sure I understand the question.


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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    You would be correct, when I decide to take a life, I feel it is my responsibility to do so as quickly and as efficiently as possible. This way of thinking has come from many years of experience, and also from some hard earned lessons.

    I will admit that I have wounded animals and either have not been able to find them or found them after they were no longer edible. Every one of those haunt me to this day and helped changed the way I hunt. I could make a variety of excuses, but it really boils down to being unwilling to wait for the best shot, or being afraid that the animal may get away. I instantly regretted taking those shoots and each time I searched for those animals until I was exhausted and unable to continue.

    I can not just live with it and have the mentality that the predators have to eat to and continue to hunt for another animal. Those lost animals haunt me, and I have vowed to honor them by not repeating the same mistakes.

    I'm now totally happy to come home with no meat as opposed to wounding an animal and not being able to kill it quickly. The mental anguish is simply too great for me.

    I pride myself in being a proficient hunter and to me that means knowing my limits and the limits of my equipment. I was taught that if you are going to do something, do it the best you can.
    I hear ya, same here! I like hunting, I like eating game, I donít like the killing part much but killing and not making use of the critter feels very wrong and disrespectful. I flat out wonít hunt those tough little quail down in Arizona without a dog, they hit the ground running and brush up to die where you canít find them leaving me very upset that I killed something for nothing.

    I shoot till itís down just like Grandpa and Dad learned me too. More lead may not be more dead in worst case (though I like that saying) but at least itís going to be more sign to trail and hopefully not as far to go.

    I also donít do any celebrating till my hands are bloody from opening the neck, until then I donít know for positive sure that the deed is done. Leaned the hard way from hunting stink pigs in Arizona that taking your eyes off game when ya ďthinkĒ they are dead can make the job a lot harder and longer. If Iím with others after the shooting someone will stay put with eyes on the critter (or where we think it is) while the shooter moves to there, itís too easy to loose game ya just thought was dead. And even if it is dead you can walk to where you thought it was but everything looks so different from the new vantage that you can get all turned around and end up looking all over for it anyway. Ya it seems silly but if ya hunted much at all I know you been there just like me, beating the bushes where you thought you put a dead critter but itĎs really 50 foot over to ta other side of that tree that looks like this tree! A dedicated spotter stops all that mess.
    Andy
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    The part I like about the shoot once mentality.......

    It means I really really really plan on making that one shot count. Good angles, decent range, good rest, excellent chance of retrieval where it is.

    I always have a second or third ready, but I do everything I can to know that first one is gonna make it dead, and the others may just be to plant them (moose get one low in the chest, and one at the base of the hump if they are still standing). I have hunted with guys that really believe in throwing lead til it goes click, reloading and continuing to shoot....have also seen them not settle in on the first shot making all the others a necessity....or a long empty-ended blood trail....I don't like that and would hunt with a one shot hunter anyday over a cowboy.

    My first experiences and the majority of my kills are still bowkills so I don't expect them to flop over and that one shot is all I get. I keep this mentality with a rifle in my hands but do appreciate the ability to reach out and finish things if I can.

    And, I don't think there's a greater thrill when you pull of what you know is a good shot, and you are standing on the blood trail knowing it's just a matter of good woodsmanship and you will take your quarry home. Lots of folks don't know how to track and therefore end up throwing lots of lead hoping for that gratifacation of the animal dropping in sight.

    That said, I've messed up, spent days looking for animals I didn't get to eat, but rarely would a second shot have been there....I just choked the first one.

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