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Thread: .300WM Bullet for minimal meat loss?

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    Default .300WM Bullet for minimal meat loss?

    Right now I am shooting 180gr XP3s. The bullet does a good job but seams to do too good of a job on smaller animals (deer and small caribou). ie. it leaves a big hole and damages a lot of meat even with a good shot placement. If I want to minimize meat loss (assuming proper shot placement). What is a good factory round to use for a .300WM? Should I go down in grain or just try a different bullet in the 180 grain?

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    The 300WM can be pretty hard on meat. Much of your damage is done by trauma due to high velocity impact. I'd go with a larger bullet (200-220gr.) of stout construction. This will slow the bullet down and by using a bullet that holds together you won't get damage from bullet fragments. This is why you always hear people say they could eat right up to the hole when referring to a 30-30 or another low velocity round.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    For 20 years I shot nothing but my winny mag. BUT This exact problem is why I love the bigger pills. Have shot several moose, caribou and a musk ox with my .375h&h and you can literally eat to the bullet hole.

    I don't know that a different bullet is going to make that much of a difference with that hot winny mag. But then again, I'm not all that smart when it comes to bullets. Don't get me wrong, I think the win mag is the perfect weapon for Alaska. Deer to brown bear in one nice package.
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    If I went to a 200 or 220gr would I compromise accuracy much? I guess I am hoping for the best of both worlds here (which is probably unrealistic). Keeping accuracy out to, say 300 yds, with a heavier bullet to minimize meat damage?

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    300 Win Mag shooting 200 grain Accubond - choose your load: 71.0 H4831 is "my" choice - 2900 fps at the muzzle and calculate what it does to 500 yards - VERY stable bullet in flight and will stay together when it hits - with a B.C. of .588 and S.D. of .301, at 2900 from a 7 lb rifle it doesn't rattle the shooter - WHAT more can a hunter ask for ?? At 50 yards it will stop a P.O.'d Griz, at 300 yds it will penetrate an elk anywhere you want it to and at 500 yds it will knock a ram flat .......

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    Well heaver bullet will help some, shooting at longer range will help some, tough bullets or solids will help some. Rolling your own (or buying custom ammo) so that you can tailor your lode to the hunting your doing would help a whole bunch . . . then you can turn your 300WM into a 30-30 or 06 whenever ya want.
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    I load the 200 grain Partition most of the time. At the 2700-2800fps level it generates, performance is excellent while meat loss is cut down. That's in the realm velocity-wise of an 06 with 180 partitions, and it's no more destructive.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    .300s are hard on meat. I use 180s and shoot behind the shoulder. I do lose a little rib meat- an amount I consider acceptable. If you shoot through the shoulders you will ruin a lot of meat. 200s and 220s will slow the bullet down and with good construction that could minimize meat loss somewhat.

    Stay clear of the 150s- most become virtual bombs at the speeds a .300 is capable of.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Quote Originally Posted by Here's to Life! View Post
    seams to do too good of a job on smaller animals (deer and small caribou). ie. it leaves a big hole and damages a lot of meat even with a good shot placement.
    With a 300WM on "smaller" animals you should be shooting through the ribs and getting a double lung hit with little meat loss. You are loosing a few pounds or less of sausage meat at the most. If you are shooting through the shoulder for "good shot placement" then you are going to blow up a lot of meat. Physics are what they are.

    This year with my 300SAUM I used 180g partitions. Caribou was at 105 yards and I double lunged him. However, due to his lack of reaction I thought I must have missed. He was the only animal in the herd that was not caught up in the caribou pandamonium and running all over. He was just standing there, dying, so I hit him again and was just a touch too far forward and hit the humorous bone. It shattered both front legs and I lost about 3 to 4 pounds of meat. If I just would have waited another 10 seconds he would have tipped over with the first good hit. The first shot did not damage much meat on the far ribs. I might have lost a half pound at most. The second shot messed things up. Both hits were lethal.

    As for accuracy with the 180g partitions the 300SAUM is sighted in at 300 yards and I get 1.5 to 2 inch groups from a bench rest. At 100 yards I get one ragged whole. At 200 yards the point of impact is exactly 4 inches high. At 100 yards point of impact is point of aim, same for 300 yards from the bench.

    Factory rounds that you are asking about for a 300WM are looking for velocity to get the down range performance out of the round. No matter what box of factory ammo you buy you are going to loose meat if you shoot through the shoulder. Shoot through the ribs behind the front elbow and you will loose less meat, but still kill the critter.

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Velocity is what causes a lot of blood shot meat. Remington makes some reduced recoil loads that slow the velocity way down. If you aren't shooting further than a couple hundred yards, they are probably the answer to less meat damage.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Thanks for all the replies! Great information here. Just what I was looking for.

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    I saw two caribou shot with 300 magnums this season. One wasn't even hit in the gut, but the insides of the little fella were hyrdrostatically exploded. Big mess o green stuff coming out his mouth, the bullet hole, and the rear end. The other one faired better as he was a bit bigger bodied. With that insane amount of velocity, going to a larger bullet don't hurt a dang thing. If I owned a magnum rifle shooting 30 cal, I'd probably opt for a 200 grainer or larger. 220 grainer sure isn't out of the question either.

    The better solution is to send your rifle to JES and have it made to rebored to perfection for a very cheap price.......ahem......358 norma magnum.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    scrape the blood off and grind it up with the rest of it... youll never notice
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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Here's to Life! View Post
    If I went to a 200 or 220gr would I compromise accuracy much? I guess I am hoping for the best of both worlds here (which is probably unrealistic). Keeping accuracy out to, say 300 yds, with a heavier bullet to minimize meat damage?
    I just attended a two long range shooting school down here in Arizona. The current Army Sniper that demoed the shots at the beginning of the class was shooting hand loaded 208gr Hornady A-Max bullets from a 1:10 twist 300WM. He was hitting every thing he aimed at out to 1400 yards. I have to assume accuracy isn't compromised with the heavier bullets.

    The A-Max is a target round but the length in the 208gr bullet shows that a 300WM can stabilize a long heavy bullet and retain it's accuracy if the reloader / shooter does his job correctly.

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    I've killed several caribou, a bear and a goat with a 300wm shooting 180 Barnes triple-shocks with average range around 200 yards. As long you make a clean behind the shoulder shot without hitting the shoulder bone I haven't experienced much meat loss. Now if you hit the shoulder bone it's a different story.

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    Change your shot placement on those smaller animals.

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    use a bullet that won't grenade. The partition, barnes and A-frames come to mind in factory ammo. They should plenty accurate to 300 yards. After that, it is hard to find factory ammo that is up to snuff.

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