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Thread: ? for you argo guys

  1. #1
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    Default ? for you argo guys

    for you guys with the 8 wheel argos, what type of terrain are the tracks best suited? i'm thinking about big tussocks, soggy muskeg type stuff with no real existing trail. wheels alone work ok or better to track up?

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    Travel across the tussucks is rough whether with or without tracks. I'd prefer the tracked ride across the tussocks, rocks, and roots. Another major benefit of tracks is that they help protect the rims and sidewalls from rock damage.

    As for the soft stuff.... that's where the tracks really shine. Tracked travel is faster and get stuck way less.

    Traveling without tracks would be best suited if you travel across wide stretches of deep open water (get a motor for that)... or the improved sections of roads/trails.

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Tracks are also a must have for snow travel.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    There are lots of benefits to the tracks that I didn't realize at the time I purchased them. The traction is much better. Can't count the number of hills where the tires would spin on the wet roots and mud when without tracks. But can get up them pretty easy now with the tracked machine.

    Other benefits of the tracks include:
    The wide tire footprint lets the machine glide over the top of those ATV ruts.
    The tracks also seem to provide more stability (wider footprint) against rolling.

    There are a lot of things I would give up before I would give up the tracks.

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    i hear a set of tracks calling my name...thanks guys !

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    From what I understand, not all tracks are equal. I run the rubber conveyor belt style tracks.

    I have no experience with nor heard any praises about the segmented plastic ones.

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Ran plastic tracks for 6 years on all my argos. Never had much of a problem except when the came loose. also get the "SUPER " tracks
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  8. #8

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    You'll love having tracks. These machines really shine in "sinky" terrain and the ability to trail break and mow over things. That is where you'll need the tracks. Mud tires are great until you get to bottomless terrain or are towing heavy. An amphib on snow-tracks is a ball to play around with too because you can just drive over downed trees and other rough/nasty terrain and keep right on going over super-deep snow, stay warm, and carry lots of stuff.
    Solid rubber belting tracks are great in the snow but can sometimes be stopped in the worst of mud.
    Open tracks..adair or escargo tracks (individual crossers where mud/slush/snow can fall right through) win in the bottomless terrain, especially mud and can more easily double as a winch.
    The adair tracks are light and seem to be transitioning into an all plastic-crosser "version" of the escargo. They are even starting to use rubber belting like the escargo too. Lots of guys seem to like them. You will need traction enhancers for winter use. They don't cost as much.
    The escargo steel crosser tracks (heavier but the most durable) have excellent traction (including ice), are easy to attach snow extensions to, can be easily modified to save weight. The escargo crosser is waay strong and would take a long, long time to try to make yourself. It really is an awesome design but man-hour intensive to make. However there are very few "parts" to the rest of the track...very basic especially in the bush.
    Any tracks will be better than not having them. If you're willing the spend the $$, I'd recommend the escargo for Alaska conditions, durability, and adjustability. I know they're made for 22/24/25" tires. I tried 4 other sets of tracks on different machines before getting the escargos I have now. They all worked but not as well. Sometimes you spend more money when you try to be cheap. Hope that helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sh View Post
    i hear a set of tracks calling my name...thanks guys !
    sh,,,,,I'm running two-[2] styles of Tracks, the new "Adair-HD" for mud and heavy rutted trails, and the Argo factory 18" wide rubber track for the snow. I don't run just tires at all any more, used too, but once you go "Tracked" you'll never go back. I'm also running Adair's Track Tuners, Two-[2] on each side, the Two-[2] middle tires/wheels on each side that is, makes a "BIG" improvement in performance with both Track styles, which also relates to better Gas mileage as well.
    The German ---2010 750-HDI-ADTranny

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    thanks buzz and german for your info.

    what are track tuners? i have never heard of them.

  11. #11

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    Take a look at adair argo's website. Looks like a simple hub/spindle that is designed around replacing an argo wheel spacers. Depending on the width of your tracks, different width wheel spacers are used to create more clearance to the plastic body. Track tuners take the place of these wheel spacers on the center two axles only. The existing wheel spacers remain on the front/rear axles. The track tuner looks like a spindle mounted to a round plate. This plate has holes drilled that match the lug studs on your machine. This plate/spindle has a hub mounted over it. This hub has lug studs which also match the lug pattern on your wheels. So in a sense it is a wheel spacer but the outer lug studs free-wheel from the inner mounting plate that bolts onto your existing hub, so it disconnects the wheel from the rotation of the axle. Now the center 2 axles are idlers and the front/rear (most important) remain driven by the chains inside the machine. All the axles in the machine are actually still moving with the chains, the center two just no longer turn the wheels. Since the tracks wrap the tires, and all tires are not exactly the same diameter (even identical factory tires) you can run into problems because of chain "wind-up". Since all the axles are connected with chain, but the tires are not perfectly equal, it is important to carefully measure the diameter of all tires before installing. Argo recommends a certain installation pattern as well as a specific air pressure requirement for certain tire positions front to rear. While this helps chain wind up and prevents some of the stress from being placed directly on chain tensioners, it still exists and is hard on bearings and sprockets. Track tuners help to stop most of this. This is mostly a problem on rubber tracks because of the high-friction between the rubber tires and rubber belting. Some people will recommend removing the rear chains, essentially turning the rear tires into idlers and providing relief from chain wind-up. The downside is your front three tires sometimes cannot provide enough power to turn the track without the back tire helping. I've had the front 3 tires spinning inside the track because of this. I wouldn't remove the rear chains because of this. A track-tuner seems like a better solution (if running rubber tracks) as it still allows the front/rear axles to remain driven, and they have the most contact surface with the track for transferring power. It would also allow you to pick the air pressure you want in the tires to customize your ride and ability to turn without suffering the chain wind-up problems of different tire diameters.

  12. #12
    Member The German's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    Take a look at adair argo's website. Looks like a simple hub/spindle that is designed around replacing an argo wheel spacers. Depending on the width of your tracks, different width wheel spacers are used to create more clearance to the plastic body. Track tuners take the place of these wheel spacers on the center two axles only. The existing wheel spacers remain on the front/rear axles. The track tuner looks like a spindle mounted to a round plate. This plate has holes drilled that match the lug studs on your machine. This plate/spindle has a hub mounted over it. This hub has lug studs which also match the lug pattern on your wheels. So in a sense it is a wheel spacer but the outer lug studs free-wheel from the inner mounting plate that bolts onto your existing hub, so it disconnects the wheel from the rotation of the axle. Now the center 2 axles are idlers and the front/rear (most important) remain driven by the chains inside the machine. All the axles in the machine are actually still moving with the chains, the center two just no longer turn the wheels. Since the tracks wrap the tires, and all tires are not exactly the same diameter (even identical factory tires) you can run into problems because of chain "wind-up". Since all the axles are connected with chain, but the tires are not perfectly equal, it is important to carefully measure the diameter of all tires before installing. Argo recommends a certain installation pattern as well as a specific air pressure requirement for certain tire positions front to rear. While this helps chain wind up and prevents some of the stress from being placed directly on chain tensioners, it still exists and is hard on bearings and sprockets. Track tuners help to stop most of this. This is mostly a problem on rubber tracks because of the high-friction between the rubber tires and rubber belting. Some people will recommend removing the rear chains, essentially turning the rear tires into idlers and providing relief from chain wind-up. The downside is your front three tires sometimes cannot provide enough power to turn the track without the back tire helping. I've had the front 3 tires spinning inside the track because of this. I wouldn't remove the rear chains because of this. A track-tuner seems like a better solution (if running rubber tracks) as it still allows the front/rear axles to remain driven, and they have the most contact surface with the track for transferring power. It would also allow you to pick the air pressure you want in the tires to customize your ride and ability to turn without suffering the chain wind-up problems of different tire diameters.
    sh,---Buzz has pretty well explained it all, i will tell you that i am also running Adair's "Steel" wheel spacers on my front and rear driving wheels, i was never a fan of the factory aluminum spacer with the Five-[5] one-piece "long" hex type mounting stud adapters, just a little to flimsy for my taste. Again as i said in my earlier post, once you go "TRACKED" you'll never go back.-
    The German

  13. #13
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    I ran without tracks all summer and fall. It was really frustrating to see where I wanted to go but just couldn't get there. I have since put a set of Argo Plastic Super Tracks on. And I truly believe there isn't to many places I couldn't go, wither it be the nastiest muskeg, marsh, snow whatever. My buddy is running a Mudd-Ox and the rubber argo tracks. He had his rig before me. We would get out to glass and sink to our knees in mud. However the machine was sitting on top. Ground pressure is between 1-2psi. Check craigslist there are a few sets on there from time to time.
    Feel free to PM me i can help out and point you toward info.

    Do a search on youtube there are tons of videos from "rockdoctor" showing off several different styles of tracks on different terrain

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