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Thread: what works best for coyotes?

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default what works best for coyotes?

    okay.. havent REALLY trapped in years.. but we are being over run by yotes in the anderson clear areas...

    kids want to run a line again this year... and target yotes...

    trying to gather things for a bait pile or two...

    made 60+ snares.. and have several #4.. and some 330 coni's...

    recomendations?
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    Member trapperbob's Avatar
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    Snares set away from the bait pile on their pre-established trails, preferably leaving the bait. I have foot held one but snares stay working and will even get older smarter coyotes.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    thanks Trapperbob... any suggestions on setting up the bait pile? does it need to be good size? wait till things actually freeze up? snow?

    on the edge of a brush line or deep in it... never really targeted yotes before, aside from the calling. i know a lot of people dont as they are not worth much, and ours tend to be rather lice ridden up here.

    neighbors are loosing pets to them though, and we have the time to do it...
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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I agree with Trapperbob. Snares are much easier to keep working and I have had much more success with snares than traps. I have caught two coyotes in 330 conibears, but that is a total fluke. They were wolverine sets that were encountered by incredibly dumb coyotes so I wouldnt recommend coni's.

    I have used both the thompson locks and berkshires, and I would like to try the mini locks, maybe this year. Personally I would recommend using snares larger than 1/16", but I know plenty of guys who use them because they will usually break at the ferrel if you leg snare a moose. You will occasionally loose a coyote using wire that small though. Entanglement is the key. If using small wire, make sure they tangle up good so they dont get much room to lunge.

    I try to put my bait piles in brushy (alder preferably to avoid the moosey areas) areas so there are lots of openings to snare and plenty of places to anchor. Usually I try to keep the bait within say 20 yards of my trail at the edge of the brush. That way I can see all the snares and the bait right from the machine with out having to get off unless I see a snare that needs fixing or need to add bait or whatever. I try to stay away from the snares as much as possible and I kill the snowmachine when I stop to avoid leaving an exhaust melt at the snare site.

    Good luck catching them, I figure they displace the native fox so I try to catch them whenever I have time...

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    snares and baitpiles can be your best friend on a trapline! I use smaller snares than most guys (1/16 cable) and I buy my snares from the snareshop pre loaded and died white. 90% of my sets are in the snow and they become part of the background.

    Besides backing away from the baitpile at least 50 yds I like to find areas that the animals are going up and down a hill. If you think about it when you walkk up a hill or go down a hill you tend to push a little harder. Catches the animals off guard a little more.

    Chin lifters are great if your in an area that doesn't have tons of people that trap but I've found that I actually do better without one, opening my snare up just a little more and making it completely blind to the animal.

    When you are creating your sets do your best to make it so you don't have to physically walk over to them to check them. This is one of the reason snares can be a better set than steel traps. My actual traps I break out of the snow every check to make sure they are not froze in. You don't have to do that with snares.

    Good luck!!!

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    Sounds like some fast action predator calling is in order! Be warned you get one charging in to the call and you WILL be addicted.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bsj425 View Post
    Sounds like some fast action predator calling is in order! Be warned you get one charging in to the call and you WILL be addicted.
    lol already am... but i dont the the time to call them all in... your more then welcome to come down Brian... ill give ya directions soon as things get cold... already snow on the ground.. and Ferry is full of them also, they yowled up by the sheep all season
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    If you have a snowmachine/4-wheeler just make trail sets and you can't miss. Plus you'll catch everything else in the area.

    Simple and one of my most productive sets. If you haven't done very much snaring before a bait pile will just frustrate you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lbtrapper View Post
    If you have a snowmachine/4-wheeler just make trail sets and you can't miss. Plus you'll catch everything else in the area.

    Simple and one of my most productive sets. If you haven't done very much snaring before a bait pile will just frustrate you.

    very good advice, I tend to forget my first seasons on a bait pile. IB is spot on with the trail sets. His go to trap on these sets besides snares is a #5 AK Bridger, monster traps, huge pans, money!

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    Hey, the bigger the better!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    i can do that on my own land... but the rest of the trails are frequented by locals, mushers, and pets...
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    For what it's worth we have lots of yotes around here and 330's just dont do the trick. Snares and leg holds are the way to go.

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    Member nooksack's Avatar
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    Not a master coyote snarer by any means but have caught a few. This is just my opinion so take it for what it's worth...

    Coyote snaring is a blast. They are smart wiley critters and a good challenge to get more than just a few out of an area. They are not the top predator so therefore are more alert than say a wolf who really only has to be on the lookout for humans and other wolves.

    Coyotes are creatures of opportunity so they are always on the look out for and easy meal. I have used this to my advantage by snaring the edges of openings where they are hunting\scavenging especially rivers or streams. When they are on the edge they are checking out the entire area for food or danger. Once they get back in the brush all they have to concentrate on is the path they are on. Making it more important to keep your snares subtle. Put them on bends in the trail or in pinch points. Coyotes will crawl under very low obstacles and these are great places to snare. Areas where they go up on to a bank or around a any obstacle are good spots. Paths between open areas are good. They tend to use the same trails over and over set several snares in good looking spots so you don't have to go back in and rehang after a snare catches.

    Keep your snares clean and the gear you hang them with clean as well. This may not be necessary to some but you will catch more by keeping your scent to a minimum.
    Coyotes are chewers and entanglement is preferred. Give a coyote some time and he will chew out if not choked out. Be careful using smaller than 5/64 for this reason.
    Make as little disturbance as possible and don't step on the path you are snaring. Be as quick as you can when hanging your snares. Look a a location from a distance get your snare out and ready and go in hang it get back out. Try not to get to close to your snares when you check them. Some coyotes my follow your foot/snogo trail some will never set foot on it.

    Baits for coyotes can be very successful or very frustrating. Pay attention to the tracks and snare them up. It does not matter if you get them coming or going as they are not a pack animal and do not teach the whole group. They are more along the lines of sneak in and get some before its gone. They will circle and may not come in, snare the paths they make.
    Big baits frozen or anchored onto lakes are good set ups. Once they start working the bait drive the edge of the lake on your snogo and look for their entry and exit tracks. Set these up. The longer you let them work it the better the main trails will show up. They won't always take them and will make new ones if they are suspicious or smell you.

    Footholds are good once you educate them with snares and for places with no cover to snare, but for the most part you can hang a couple snares for the time it takes to maintain a foothold and they are always working for the most part.
    If you trap coyotes that have been trapped before there a good chance you will run into old smart ones that can be a real challenge they can be tough to fool but that is what makes snaring coyotes fun.


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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    thanks Nook!, thats a good write up.. I havent really ever tried for them... and have high hopes this year...

    i was given some bait for the pile last week, and hauled it down to my place in clear on Sat... stacked it up in the snow-go sled, and came home... i was back sunday less then 12 hours later.. and they had already been into it and torn all the bags open, and a set of Martin tracks in the snow around it also...

    i had to wrap it all up, and cover it with plywood till season opens... but i dont think ill have to haul it too far. it would be nice to set the pile now... but AWT calls prebaiting ... Feeding wildlife... so.. its a no go
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Kiddo and i got our traps dipped and dyed today... should be able to run a few miles around the place..

    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    Most was already covered, Ill add though that if you have any beaver lodges, or muskrat houses in your area.. dont neglect those.. Coyotes, and fox will ALWAYS go form house to house.. getting up on top of them to look around.. you can make a blind set, snare their trail going to or from the lodge in the brush or use some baver castor gland.. Dont take much, anchor your trap to the top of the lodge, find a notch on the top of the house that naturally directs them to a certain spot.. drop the castor, set a #2, wax paper, sift snow.. etc.. sort of like a dirt hole on top of a beaver hut.. Of you can just make a couple blind sets.. eventually they will step on the pan.

    As for snaring, I snare on hills.. either up or down.. drop off, cut banks, etc.. Find a open area surrounded by thick brushy areas that create a funnel.. the tracks and trails will show you where they are.. I avoid setting on corners as fox and yotes slow down on curves to look around for danger.. then sprint the straight aways.. If you get em running on a straight away.. in a snare.. their toast..

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Unfortuantly.. most our area is pretty flat... and the hills out beyond already have established traplines on them and i dont plan on infringing on them Not a lot of bever or water in those flats either... Nenana river is a few miles away, so after freeze up we maybe able to run it and seek some.>


    I have picked up aobut 300 lbs of bait off Craigs list, this week... so the next question is, how far apart should the bait piles be in flat country? 1 mile? 2? 3? i have access to some of the lands many non locals wont have... as long as i only target yotes on there lands, as they want to keep fox and lynx around for their use and enjoyments on private prop... i can respect that easly enough.



    Quote Originally Posted by Hoytguy View Post
    Most was already covered, Ill add though that if you have any beaver lodges, or muskrat houses in your area.. dont neglect those.. Coyotes, and fox will ALWAYS go form house to house.. getting up on top of them to look around.. you can make a blind set, snare their trail going to or from the lodge in the brush or use some baver castor gland.. Dont take much, anchor your trap to the top of the lodge, find a notch on the top of the house that naturally directs them to a certain spot.. drop the castor, set a #2, wax paper, sift snow.. etc.. sort of like a dirt hole on top of a beaver hut.. Of you can just make a couple blind sets.. eventually they will step on the pan.

    As for snaring, I snare on hills.. either up or down.. drop off, cut banks, etc.. Find a open area surrounded by thick brushy areas that create a funnel.. the tracks and trails will show you where they are.. I avoid setting on corners as fox and yotes slow down on curves to look around for danger.. then sprint the straight aways.. If you get em running on a straight away.. in a snare.. their toast..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Oh.. and if i give you directions to go call and shoot them... Dont be like Labman... and MISS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    E... we'll have to do it this winter.. will give ya tour
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    I don't miss if your using snares, have to set on coyote trails, etc., not to say a lynx or fox won't step through the hoop., but it can and probably will happen.

    I just make 1 bait pile, once the birds find it, the predators will too, they will come from miles. Then snare 50-100 yards off it on trails leading to and from it. Animals are cautios going in, I try and set in the trails with tracks leaving., they grab a bite, haul ass and run right into your snare. Lights out

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    Oh.. and if i give you directions to go call and shoot them... Dont be like Labman... and MISS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    ou

    Jerk... I already told you, it was self defense! How accurate are you when have a yote charging down your throat!?

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