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Thread: Why do you choose...

  1. #1
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    Default Why do you choose...

    Why do you choose the area that you hunt?

    Familiarity (hunted the same area year after year)? Established camp? Success in the Past? New Frontiers? Tip from a friend? Forum reports? Etc...

    If it is the same area year after year, what keeps you going back? If new frontiers, why?

  2. #2
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    I know my "country" and where to be and when to be there, as well as my alternatives, if all else fails. I get info from others and go new places still, sometimes just to go.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    In any given year I hunt at least 8-10 different areas. If you take small game and predator hunting out of the equation, it's still generally 5 or 6. Since August this year I've been fortunate enough to chase big game in four different areas. I primarily choose my areas based on time constraints, targeted species, familiarity with the area, and access. I love exploring new areas, but there is also a time and place for simply filling the freezer in a known area that is known to produce. I generally try to hunt at least one new area each fall and try to explore as many new areas as possible during the off-season as time allows. I love the sense of exploration that comes with a new area and the potential for finding a nugget of gold in a heap of rubble - you just never know what's over that next ridge, and that potential is endlessly exciting to me. Still, there's something wonderful about being in a valley where you've taken multiple animals and each roll in the terrain seems like an old friend as you wander paths trodden before.

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    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    guess you opened a big can of what if and what fors here.

    My main hunt each year is researched online, onfoot, by vehicle, by word of word, and any other methods I can use.
    I also look at (recently) high percentage draw hunts and those areas. Even if yuo don't get drawn... those high %'s means more meat available.
    But some of my yearly hunts I go to the very same place, the very same "stands", and sometimes see the same animals as the year before.
    Example would be my Texas hunt- the stands have names, memories, and the people I visit are like family, or maybe even better (if you know hunting friends and some family members)
    I still like to see what's over the horizon sometimes though. just throw your backpack on and have a plan on when you need to get back before they come looking for you carcuss.

    Same as using the same rifle, sometimes I really like to use the same proven 300 WSM, sometimes (with a tear in hte corner of my eye) I will use my Pappy's rifle. Sometimes, a new harvesting tool and new methods or skills to learn.

    This help answer your question?

    Chris

  5. #5
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    I enjoyed the area I hunt so much that I purchased property there, after several years. Also, tradition and nostalgia, as my dad started hunting the area in 1961. I like the familiarity I have with each turn in the game trails. The area I hunt is probably a 30 mile circle from my place, so there are many places I only get to once every couple of years.

    I also like the idea that no one showed me the area, no one showed my dad. Just happened to stumble upon in. It would be doubtful that I will ever hunt moose or caribou or trap in any other area for the rest of my life.

    Claude
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by denalihunter View Post
    I enjoyed the area I hunt so much that I purchased property there, after several years. Also, tradition and nostalgia, as my dad started hunting the area in 1961. I like the familiarity I have with each turn in the game trails. The area I hunt is probably a 30 mile circle from my place, so there are many places I only get to once every couple of years.

    I also like the idea that no one showed me the area, no one showed my dad. Just happened to stumble upon in. It would be doubtful that I will ever hunt moose or caribou or trap in any other area for the rest of my life.

    Claude
    To end up owning land that your Dad hunted way back when has to surely be a dream come true......I know it would be for me. Congrats...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    based on access and proximity to home. i've only hunted in one unit since i've lived here but i hope to try a goat hunt on kodiak someday. its been my expierence that even though this area is huge animals are concentrated in certain spots and in really low densities in the rest of the area. i try to go where the animals are and try not to waste too much time where they aren't.

  8. #8
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    For myself, I'd have to agree with "cjustinm".........proximity to home makes it real nice to me. For a number of years I hunted moose only a couple miles from my house. Up until then I never killed one, but was always seeing cows and calves. Figuring if I put the time in I'd eventually find a bull as something had to keep siring all those calves. Finally I did kill a big bull, and for a number of years I killed one year after year. Of course moose hunting on the Kenai, and my spot as well, isn't what it used to be, but it sure was nice having a little hot spot that I could literally walk to from the house and kill a moose.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  9. #9
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Default Why do you choose...

    I like the adventure, solitude and exploring new places. Float huntin just does it for me.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  10. #10
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    Great insights.

    I hunted the same area on the Kenai Peninsula for nearly 20 years, taking 17 moose and several (not enough) black bears. I knew how the place worked. I knew when and from where the moose would show! While the nearly sure thing was great to put meat in the freezer, I often wondered about other areas.

    Well, in 2005, a small spark from a shovel changed all of that, burning my little bit of paradise to the ground (certainly making moose food in the future!), and then the drastic decline of the moose population caused me to really look at other areas around the state.

    Now, as the years are ticking away, I am thrilled to take up float hunting, and the prospect of exploring new (to me) frontiers is a bit refreshing. I do miss the familiarity of the old stomping grounds, but the adventure of the unkown is beginning pique the curiosity.

  11. #11

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    My primary hunt area is really based on how much we like the area. Despite the fact that we have gone a number of years without seeing ANY moose, much less a cow or two or sub-legal bulls, we still love the area and will go in there just looking for moose if we don't happen to get our hands on one or two caribou permits. The thought that goes through our minds if/when we draw a caribou permit is that the trip will be even better now that we can also look for caribou while in there. I have been going into this area since I was 2 years old (my parents never really slowed down with young kids, I can't imagine how they did it).

    I like to explore new areas as well, but those trips/hunts only happen if I draw a permit for the area.

  12. #12
    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I like to hunt in a different area each year. I use hunting as an excuse to see the state. There's only one place I've been to twice, but that will probably change someday.

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