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Thread: Son's first Goat

  1. #1
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    Default Son's first Goat

    Since the day my son was born 16 years ago I have wanted to take him hunting in the high country. For me there is nothing quite like mountain hunting. I put him in for sheep and goat tags that I thought we could do without missing too much school or costing an arm and a leg. When the draw results came out and he had a Kenai mountain goat tag we were excited. I used to call this the easiest goat hunt in Alaska until I helped a friend fill his goat tag in this area a few years before. After that hunt I now call this area the most accessible goat area in Alaska but certainly not the easiest.

    We hiked and climbed peaks this summer and glassed the goat area every trip we made to the Kenai. Some trips we only spotted one goat and I was a little concerned. The season opened in August but we had always planned to hunt after mid September so the goats would have a chance to get their hair back on. The weather in September was wet and windy. I was hoping for a few bluebird days but they didn't come at the times we could go. We debated if we should pack a camp up the mountain or just go light and hope we could do the hunt in one long day. Finally we decided to go light the last Saturday in September. Luckily for us three friends that are young and strong wanted to tag along, just to get out for the day.

    Unfortuneately cold weather and the first snow of the season came the morning we left Anchorage. I expected the snow to be part way down the mountain but not all the way to the highway and 29 degrees felt cold for this time of year. Here are a few pictures of the mountain from the bottom and part way up. The hike up was slick as everyone took turns slipping and falling down the mountain. More pictures and story to follow.
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    Default Son's first goat con't

    We spotted goats in the same general areas we had seen them 10 days earlier but they were much harder to spot in the snow and we didn't know if we could even climb the mountain. We eventually talked ourselves into the climb and after lots of face plants made it to the top of the brush line. A lone goat was above us in the rocks. I wanted to keep the shot to 200 yards or less and this goat looked a lot further. We ranged the goat at 250 yards at a very steep angle. I asked Logan if he wanted to shoot the goat and he said yes. We set up the shooting sticks and waited for the boom. I told him to take his time and not shoot unless he was completely steady. The gun went click. He had fired on a empty chamber. We hurried to load a shell and the goat was moving. I ranged the goat at 281 yards. I told him to hold a little higher on the chest. At the bang we all agreed he had hit the goat. The goat disappeared over the top. I was hoping not to have to climb the snow covered rocks chasing a wounded goat. We traversed across the mountain and tried to look up the drainage we thought a wounded goat might be in. No goat and the terrain look sketchy. We climbed straight up through the last alder patch and just as we finish with the alders we hear something above us. We all look up to see the now dead goat roll to a stop at the top of the waterfall directly above us. What incredible timing!

    The last pitch up to the goat was slick and steep. I was glad we had micro spikes on. Three of us were able to move th goat out of the little creek into the alders for a few pictures. The first picuture is looking across the highway to the scenic mountains. The next photo is of Logan with his first mountain goat.

    A few more photos to follow.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    After now spending four weekends trying to help my wife fill that same tag, I can attest to the fact that it is most certainly not the easiest goat hunt in Alaska - not by a long shot! Yep, the goats are visible from the road, but getting to them and recovering them is exceedingly difficult at times. Congratulations to your son for making a great shot, and congrats to you for helping him get it done.

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    Default Son's first goat Con't

    The 7mm-08 had done the job with one well place shot through the vitals. The boy made a great shot! Here are a couple of photos of Logan and me and a picture with Logan, Paul, and Dan. Paul and Dan are studs! We couldn't have done this hunt without their help and they kept thanking us for letting them tag along on Logan's hunt. The hike down was slick and took longer than I expected. I was wiped out tired when we got back to the truck at 6 P.M. We were home before dark and looking back everything seemed to go our was once we started up the mountain. The old saying the harder you hunt the luckier you get was certainly true for us on our one day goat hunt. What a great way to spend a day with my son and some good friends.
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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Right On,...
    Tough Climbing, Good Shootin', Friends with strong backs and High Endurance factor

    Fresh Snow on the ground for quick Meat Cooling,.... and (always good for a little extra humility, eg. faceplants)

    That's all how it's "Supposed to Go", in a best case scenario anyway

    Thanks for the story, and Congrats to all you guys on that one,
    I'm bettin' Logan'll never forget that day
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Congrats to you and Logan AKHUNTINFOOL! That is a fine goat and one heck of a hunt! Its good to see all the pre hunt prep paid off and you got to share the trip with a couple of good friends.

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    absolutely awesome!
    amazingly great story. which hunt was that?
    i hope to be able to go with my boy and watch him get a goat some day!!
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Talk about timing......I wondered who had shot "my" goat.....lol. Congrats to Logan for sure!!!

    I watched the whole thing unfold through the spotting scope from the truck sitting next to yours. That was me who left those gloves on your side view mirror thinking one of you had dropped them. I had been to the mountain every morning since Wednesday, and saw lots of goats in between rain and clouds, but it had been pretty difficult to judge due to the lousy weather. But when the weather broke on Friday I spotted that billy along with 2 others, and I had decided to make a stock on one of them if they were still there come Sat. morning. We got to the spot where you parked at daybreak. Glassed quite awhile but where unable to find the goats due to the new snow. We decided to head to another viewing spot down lower on the highway possibly to get a different angle. While we were glassing I spotted a nanny and kid that had just moved up from way down in the trees. Then I spotted a small billy farther south that was climbing up and away from a blackie, and they both ended up going up and over the top. At about that time the local US Forestry cop pulled in and started talking to us. He talked for quite some time being a goat hunter himself. The whole time in the back of my mind I was thinking I should be glassing instead of talking. Finally he had to go check a vehicle rollover so we headed back up to our original spot and found your truck parked there. I figured you had probably pulled in not long after we had left. You probably saw the old brown ford F-250 if any of you had looked back down. We saw that your tracks had gone across the road and figured you had probably seen a goat, or bear and were headed up after it. My buddy and I couldn't see any of you at the time so we just continued glassing. By then the snow had melted off considerably. Finally I spotted a goat with the glasses, and as I was putting the spotting scope on him my buddy said he saw a goat as well. At just the exact time I dialed in Logan's goat my buddy said he just heard a shot, and believe it or not I saw the goat get hit and jump down the mountain a ways. I could tell right away that he was hurt. I watched him lay down and get up about a half dozen times next to a leafless bush. I watched him lift, and lay his head back down for quite awhile. At about that time we saw the 5 of you appear on the mountain and head up his direction. The goat must have heard, and/or seen you all coming as he got up and lay back down a few times. Finally when you guys were about at the base of the rocks, he got up but started to fall. He caught himself pretty quick, but fell again. Still he managed to keep his legs under him. But this time he was very weak and now pretty wobbly. Finally as I watched, his legs buckled and as he started to fall again I tried to move my scope to keep site of him but lost him as he fell. And that was it, I couldn't see him anymore. I saw 4 of you go into that last alder bush next to the creek. I figured that's where the goat must have ended up. We wanted to wait for you all to come down off the mountain, but figured you were probably going to be quite awhile. So after glassing a little while longer and deciding that it was getting too late to attempt a stalk even if we had seen one, we decided to head home.

    So you see there was another goat there with Logans'. Having watched them the day before I know one was slightly bigger than the other, but I don't know which one Logan shot as I didn't want to take my scope off his to see the other one that my buddy had seen that climbed up and out of site after the shot. The third goat was the smaller of the three, and I believe he was the one that was moving up and away from the bear.

    Anyway, congrats to Logan again. I'm glad he was able to connect on a pretty long shot and get his billy. How long did his horns end up being? I hope to be heading back up in a few days, but it looks like the weather may be going to set in again.

    BTW....I did manage to kill a nice blackie up there on Thursday in the rain.....

    All the Best...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Thanks for all the comments!

    Brian I got your PM but the system won't let me respond for whatever reason. I would be glad to discuss the area with you.

    4merguide we wondered who was watching us for such a long time. Congratulations on the blackie. It is interesting to hear the story from your vantage point. We could see 4 goats from where we took the shot. A nanny and kid and two single goats. The two single goats were in rifle range and we took the one that presented itself. The goat Logan killed is a nanny with the longest horn measuring 9.5 inches. This nanny has the most billy looking horns I have ever seen. The real give away is the lack of mass. We really were trying for a billy and the shape of the horns and the goat being alone convinced me it was a billy. Logan will be out of the goat drawing in units 7 & 15 for the next 5 years for taking a nanny.

  10. #10
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    The PM was mostly to congratulate your son and to commiserate on how difficult that hunt is. I'd take any words of advice you may have, but having been on that mountain three of the past four weeks we've figured a few things out. Like I mentioned before, we took my wife's bear directly above where you got that goat.

    Hopefully we'll have a similar story to share in the next two weeks. If not, it sure won't be for a lack of trying.

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKHUNTINFOOL View Post
    The goat Logan killed is a nanny with the longest horn measuring 9.5 inches. This nanny has the most billy looking horns I have ever seen. The real give away is the lack of mass. We really were trying for a billy and the shape of the horns and the goat being alone convinced me it was a billy. Logan will be out of the goat drawing in units 7 & 15 for the next 5 years for taking a nanny.
    A NANNY...???!!! Well I'll be...!!! Now that you mention it I see the lack of mass per length of horn. But until right now, and you saying that, I would have never guessed that it was a nanny. And like you, sure would have gone up after it. Looking at your pics, if not for that last barely noticeable little quick curve a few inches from the tips it would be very hard to tell at a distance, because of the overall gradual curvature of the horns. Sorry to hear that, but at 9.5" that is definitely no slouch of a nanny. Like you said, the shape of the horns is so much like a billy it's hard to believe. That really makes me believe I have to look them over even harder now. I guess it's a good thing I never guided for goats...!!!...lol Still, that being said, other than not being able to hunt the area again for awhile, it's still is a great trophy for Logan. She is a real nice nanny.

    Brian, I got some good info from the Forestry cop I talked to. I can't stay on the puter long now, but will pm you when I return home today. This buying a house is really putting a cramp in my hunting. I should be up there right now, but don't really want to go alone either. My buddy had to go back to work and my son has to work as well. The guy that might be able to go is still not for sure. Were you planning to go up again this week end again? PM me with your plans and I'll get back with you later.

    Talk to you soon....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  12. #12
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKHUNTINFOOL View Post
    The 7mm-08 had done the job with one well place shot through the vitals. The boy made a great shot! Here are a couple of photos of Logan and me and a picture with Logan, Paul, and Dan. Paul and Dan are studs! We couldn't have done this hunt without their help and they kept thanking us for letting them tag along on Logan's hunt. The hike down was slick and took longer than I expected. I was wiped out tired when we got back to the truck at 6 P.M. We were home before dark and looking back everything seemed to go our was once we started up the mountain. The old saying the harder you hunt the luckier you get was certainly true for us on our one day goat hunt. What a great way to spend a day with my son and some good friends.
    very nice job Logan and crew. Some serious steep stuff that's goat hunting for you. Took me a few try;s before I got one. Said some prayers getting down and vowed that was it for me.

  13. #13
    Member bigdog's Avatar
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    Nice Job guys congrads a real trophy to be proud of... The more I hear stories like this with a 7mm-08 the more I am pushed to keep carrying my .308 instead of that beast of a .338 I thought I needed when I was younger and tougher...lol

  14. #14
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Congrats to a great father/son team! Well done for sure...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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