Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 32

Thread: Wounded Moose Archery Question

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    141

    Default Wounded Moose Archery Question

    If a moose is wounded by an arrow and all possible resources are used to verify it's survival, ie: blood tracking dogs, does it void your harvest/draw tag? General question, lets say unit 14. I will add a little more information on the surrounding circumstances following a few responses.
    Missing the greatest state in the Union!

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    No. Regulation booklet, page 16.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  3. #3
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Ak.
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    The only way to "void" your tag is to notch it after a successful harvest. Or to have the season end.
    If you notch your tag, i.e. a successful harvest, then you are subject to the salvage requirements.
    If you wound an animal and are unable to recover it, your tag is still good, at least in most areas. Your choice as to whether or not continue hunting tho.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    Wasn't this the proverbial Ted Nugent question in court, not too long ago? Didn't the court rule against Ted?..

  5. #5
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    The answer for Ted is also on Page 16 under the exception for bear in specific GMU's where a wounding is a punched tag. That rule does not apply to moose.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    141

    Default

    So here's the rest of the info... moose was 17 yards, quartering toward me and I thought I sunk the arrow just in the sweet spot just behind/below the shoulder, had ok penetration and about 7" break off inside the moose, recovered the rest of the arrow, revealing a total of 18" penetration....after tracking a blood trail for two days, without a lot of blood, and then getting the blood tracking dog invlolved (thanks Roger Hull from AK Game Trackers...you and your dog are amazing!!) we determined the arrow must have caught the edge of the shoulder and missed the vitals. The bull was probably 45-55", he had 3 BT on his left side and came in hot and heavy!!!!! An amazing experience for my hunting partner and I, wish the big boy was down but am relieved to know that he surely survived the arrow and is probably chasing the next cow already! I intend to hunt the tag (Ft Richardson acrchery draw) until filled....lost a good bit of sleep over this bull moose, but feel that since the shot was 100% ethical, just an unfortanate "miss", the tag will be filled in the coming weeks (hopefully).
    Missing the greatest state in the Union!

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    You would be better off with a direct broadside shot or quartering away slightly. Place your hand in front of you with your fingers about 1/4" apart. Straight on you have gaps. As you rotate your hand farther the gaps close up and no voids are apparent. The entire front section with the rotated hand shows how shielded the vitals become as ribs overlap. Hitting vitals on big game animals, you have to imagine 'where" the arrow is going to travel THROUGH and not so much as hitting the rings as placed on 3-D targets. The broader the animal the more critical this becomes. These might help you with your next shot.

    Sorry you lost the moose. I know how loosing an animal feels.

    http://www.aaaalaskanoutfitters.com/...lacement_3.jpg
    http://forums.bowsite.com/TF/pics/00small54876693.JPG
    http://www.aaaalaskanoutfitters.com/...oose_chart.jpg

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  8. #8
    Member .300wby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Valley
    Posts
    236

    Default

    Doesn't sound like an unfortunate "miss" to me.

  9. #9
    Member wykee5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Sodak
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Quartering towards shots are a terrible, terrible thing to take with archery tackle. In order to get the arrow behind the shoulder, you are generally limiting yourself to part of a single lung shot, which is often not fatal, or at least right away. After passing quartering towards shots, you will sometimes be amazed at the number of shot opportunities that come at better angles, after what you thought was your best shot. Then other times, you never get anything other than the quartering towards shot, the animal busts you, and you end up with no shot at all---which is absolutely fine, as the animal doesn't leave with an arrow in it. A good thing to do is look at an animal after it has been skinned, and picture what an arrow has to go throuh to reach vitals from various angles.
    In all reality, you probably did hit the sweet spot, right where you were aiming, but the angle was off. I trailed a doe my buddy shot once for well over a mile, and he swore he hit her right behind the shoulder. We ended up finding her dead about 8 hours after the shot, hit right behind the shoulder where he was aiming, but he had only taken out part of one lung, as the angle was more quartering towards than what he though. I don't think there is any way to say that the bull "survived" at this point, but I commend you in your recovery efforts. The key here is not being tempted the next time the poor percentage shot is presented.

  10. #10
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    You would be better off with a direct broadside shot or quartering away slightly. Place your hand in front of you with your fingers about 1/4" apart. Straight on you have gaps. As you rotate your hand farther the gaps close up and no voids are apparent. The entire front section with the rotated hand shows how shielded the vitals become as ribs overlap. Hitting vitals on big game animals, you have to imagine 'where" the arrow is going to travel THROUGH and not so much as hitting the rings as placed on 3-D targets. The broader the animal the more critical this becomes. These might help you with your next shot.

    Sorry you lost the moose. I know how loosing an animal feels.

    http://www.aaaalaskanoutfitters.com/...lacement_3.jpg
    http://forums.bowsite.com/TF/pics/00small54876693.JPG
    http://www.aaaalaskanoutfitters.com/...oose_chart.jpg
    Thanks for the lesson on archery shot placement Dave! I have never archery hunted and am way used to rifles and pistols so taking an quartering towards me shot and it being deflected by the ribs would not have gone through my head at the time. I will be sure to store that tid bit away for future use if I get into archery.

  11. #11
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default Wounded Moose Archery Question

    Not sure where you are located but if at all possible take at membership at a range with 3D.

    Practice and kill shot placement will increase drastically compared to paper.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  12. #12
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    As an archery instructor I have 2 models, one deer and one bear. As the class looks at the models there is a pin that you can place above the model to see where the students have to aim, in order to achieve a successful shot. It is enlingtening as angles increase, or below or above shots, where one has to aim for the best percentage shot.

    I hope HILL knows we are only trying to help and not criticize.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    634

    Default

    Losing a animal is a horrid feeling but it could happen to anyone using either rifle or archery, Kudo's to you for continuing to look for the animal and bringing it up in public forum.
    On a huge animal like a moose I would only take broadside shots for a possible complete pass through. In my experiences quartering shots leave less blood trail because of the wound angle

  14. #14
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    I have a friend who was asking the same question just a few days ago. He shot a bull that was standing broadside, but just as he released the arrow, the animal took a quick step forward and the arrow ended up in the hindquarter, possibly penetrating into the second quarter. He tracked it for a couple of days, with the help of an experienced blood tracker, but they lost the animal. Then the weather went down and they lost the blood. His question had two parts to it: 1) his legal responsibility and 2) his ethical responsibility. The first answer can be found in the regulation booklet, but the second can only be found inside the hunter himself.

    In the end, an animal wanders off with a very sharp stick moving around inside his body that was put there by a human. What that particular human does in response to that is perhaps the most important question.

    Just my opinion.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  15. #15
    Member .300wby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Valley
    Posts
    236

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    In the end, an animal wanders off with a very sharp stick moving around inside his body that was put there by a human. What that particular human does in response to that is perhaps the most important question.

    Just my opinion.

    -Mike
    Very well stated. This is the bottom line.

  16. #16

    Default

    I would have to agree wtih Strahan on this. Personally, I couldn't go after another animal knowing that I had made a solid hit on an animal and just couldn't recover it. The only way I would continue hunting after taking a shot would be if I could determine with almost 100% certainty that I had not hit the animal or that the shot was along the lines of knicking and antler or cutting a tuft of fur off the back.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Two thoughts come to my mind.

    First, why on earth would somebody take a quartering to shot on a heavy boned animal such as a moose, youíre just asking for a lost animal. I am not judging or going to get in a discussion about ethics but if I was you I wouldn't use the 100% number.

    The other thought is from Michael's post.

    If I had some one tell me that they shot at a perfectly broad side moose and it took one step forward and they hit in the ham I would have to tell them they need to get closer before the shot. People are trying to expand the range on a piece of equipment that was meant to be a short range piece of equipment. If I remember right, correct me if Iím wrong but the NBEF teaches 40 yards in the open and 30 in brush.

  18. #18
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    I have never heard of the NBEF information posted. Thirty yards in brush. Sorry but I don't think anyone could state that. One twig can deflect an arrow or bullet. The effective range of each person has to be the responsibility of the individuals own abilities.

    In harvesting of my Alaska animals, only on one occasion have I not gotten a complete pass though; that on a bear. Two caribou at 50 broadside and a moose at 26 broadside, completely blew through. On the moose it blew completely through and 20 yards beyond. Missed the ribs going in but cut one in half on the way out. Double lunged and dead in 30 feet.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  19. #19
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Default

    Not really gonna step in to this too much, but my first thought is that somebody needs to read Ashby's studies on broadheads and switch to cut-on-contact single-beveled points. The info available is incontrovertible. Look on Tradgang.com and search "ashby".
    7" of penetration?
    Pathetic.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  20. #20
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Anchorville
    Posts
    597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Thanks for the lesson on archery shot placement Dave! I have never archery hunted and am way used to rifles and pistols so taking an quartering towards me shot and it being deflected by the ribs would not have gone through my head at the time. I will be sure to store that tid bit away for future use if I get into archery.
    I will say that this piece of information is included in the Archery Hunting Safety Course (you have to take if you want to hunt in an archery-only area). Hunter education may be a lot of pretty basic info or stuff you already know, but it is a good idea.
    My signature is awesome.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •