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Thread: Yelloweye

  1. #1
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    Default Yelloweye

    What constitutes a "yelloweye" according to Alaska DFG?

    I had naively assumed that yellow/orange rockfish with yellow eye and a light horizontal stripe was a yelloweye. But I recently was on a tuna charter boat in San Diego and it had a rockfish poster on a wall. I was astonished to see at least 6-7 rockfish that looked exactly like a yelloweye were in fact a different species. That got me thinking, when DFG says 1 yelloweye per year, is it generic any orange rockfish with yellow eye and horizontal stripe or is it truly specific to "yelloweye" and other similar looking species do not count?

    Is this why these anglers are able to keep more than 1 per day?
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    The regs are specific to yelloweye, Sebastes ruberrimus. There are several other species that look very similar, but if you know what to look for you can tell them apart. I fish quite a bit around San Francisco, where canary and vermillion rockfish are two common species that can look a lot like a yelloweye. Many people get fined every year because they can't tell the difference. I have some friends that release everything orange to avoid any issues. In southern California the cowcod is similar. In Alaska you can catch shortraker rockfish which also look a lot like yelloweye. Know your regs and know how to ID the fish you catch. www.afsc.noaa.gov/race/media/publications/.../techmemo117.pdf does a pretty good job of pointing out the differences and has decent color pictures too.

    Big_E

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by torpedo View Post
    What constitutes a "yelloweye" according to Alaska DFG?

    I had naively assumed that yellow/orange rockfish with yellow eye and a light horizontal stripe was a yelloweye. But I recently was on a tuna charter boat in San Diego and it had a rockfish poster on a wall. I was astonished to see at least 6-7 rockfish that looked exactly like a yelloweye were in fact a different species. That got me thinking, when DFG says 1 yelloweye per year, is it generic any orange rockfish with yellow eye and horizontal stripe or is it truly specific to "yelloweye" and other similar looking species do not count?

    Is this why these anglers are able to keep more than 1 per day?
    Yeah, vaaler is right on about the ID thing and especially the "know your regs" thing because the number you're allowed to keep/possess depends on where you're fishing. Two per person like your photo shows would be legal in some parts of the state, but not in others. Not sure where in the state you're only allowed "1 yelloweye per year" like you said. Around here (Homer area) it's 1 per day and 2 in possession, but not 1 per year. Maybe you're reading the "entire year" thing in the regs as meaning just 1 per year, but the "entire year" thing means the season for them is the entire year as opposed to a seasonal thing.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    Yeah, vaaler is right on about the ID thing and especially the "know your regs" thing because the number you're allowed to keep/possess depends on where you're fishing. Two per person like your photo shows would be legal in some parts of the state, but not in others. Not sure where in the state you're only allowed "1 yelloweye per year" like you said. Around here (Homer area) it's 1 per day and 2 in possession, but not 1 per year. Maybe you're reading the "entire year" thing in the regs as meaning just 1 per year, but the "entire year" thing means the season for them is the entire year as opposed to a seasonal thing.
    Since I only get to come up to Alaska once a year, I guess in my mind 1 per possession equals 1 per year but you are right it is 1 per possession for non resident. When you look at a yelloweye, what are fool proof characteristics? horizontal light stripe? rough head? I caught several that look just like those in the picture which I released because I already had 1 in possession. In SE alaska where I fished and these photos were taken this year, only 1 per day which makes me think these are not yelloweyes in the picture.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by torpedo View Post
    Since I only get to come up to Alaska once a year, I guess in my mind 1 per possession equals 1 per year but you are right it is 1 per possession for non resident. When you look at a yelloweye, what are fool proof characteristics? horizontal light stripe? rough head? I caught several that look just like those in the picture which I released because I already had 1 in possession. In SE alaska where I fished and these photos were taken this year, only 1 per day which makes me think these are not yelloweyes in the picture.
    To answer your questions I would HIGHLY suggest you actually talk to someone from ADF&G. I'm not trying to evade your questions, but all too often you'll find people that will answer your question and you have NO idea whether they know what they are talking about or not. There are a LOT of well intentioned people here and you'll probably get all sorts of answers, but just think about standing in front of a judge trying to explain away the ticket you got because the "shortraker" rockfish you caught were actually "yelloweye" and you say to the judge, "Well this guy that I have never met and I don't know at all on a public forum I participate on told me how to ID a yelloweye and from his description I didn't think they were actually yelloweye." I know what I'd feel like and I'd hate for someone else to feel that way. Especially if I was the one that gave someone misinformation.

    That being said, I'd take a look at the site vaaler posted, though if you click on his link it doesn't seem to work. Try this one: http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/groundfish/...ockfishtoc.htm. It gives very good descriptions of all the different rockfish.

    And to answer your question about the fish in that picture you could very well be correct. As vaaler has already said the shortraker looks incredibly similar as do a number of other rockfish. I know I couldn't offhand just tell you how to tell the difference and in a picture like the one you posted they could very well be shortrakers. Take a look at the shortraker rockfish at the NOAA site and you'll see what I mean.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

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    Torpedo,

    For those of us nonresidents, the limit in the SE is one fish per year from the "outside waters", or two from "inside waters". The think the fish in the pictures (from Tanaku dge?) are shortrakers from the Pumpkin Patch, which have a limit of two per day for non-residents. The shortrakers come from deep water, typically 500' - 900', and are more pumpkin colored than orange. If you are fishing west of Elfin Cove in water less than 300' deep I think it is pretty certain that any orange fish you catch is a yelloweye - I have never caught a vermillion or a canary rockfish up there. There is still quite a bit of variability in coloration; smaller ones (<5 lb) tend to be a light orange and have a very distinct pale line. The first picture is a classic good sized sized yelloweye; very orange, with no distinct ligher color along the lateral line. Big fish from shallow water, ~60', can be very dark orange, example in the second picture (along with a small, light colored one)

    Attachment 64080 Attachment 64081

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    Quote Originally Posted by vaaler View Post
    Torpedo,

    For those of us nonresidents, the limit in the SE is one fish per year from the "outside waters", or two from "inside waters". The think the fish in the pictures (from Tanaku dge?) are shortrakers from the Pumpkin Patch, which have a limit of two per day for non-residents. The shortrakers come from deep water, typically 500' - 900', and are more pumpkin colored than orange. If you are fishing west of Elfin Cove in water less than 300' deep I think it is pretty certain that any orange fish you catch is a yelloweye - I have never caught a vermillion or a canary rockfish up there. There is still quite a bit of variability in coloration; smaller ones (<5 lb) tend to be a light orange and have a very distinct pale line. The first picture is a classic good sized sized yelloweye; very orange, with no distinct ligher color along the lateral line. Big fish from shallow water, ~60', can be very dark orange, example in the second picture (along with a small, light colored one)

    Attachment 64080 Attachment 64081
    Thank you Muttley for your practicality and Vaaler for your amazing knowledge of what I consider to be a very confusing topic. I guess the safe thing to do is to move on once you catch an orange fish.

  8. #8
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    This link should work: http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/race/media/...echmemo117.pdf

    Quote Originally Posted by vaaler View Post
    The regs are specific to yelloweye, Sebastes ruberrimus. There are several other species that look very similar, but if you know what to look for you can tell them apart. I fish quite a bit around San Francisco, where canary and vermillion rockfish are two common species that can look a lot like a yelloweye. Many people get fined every year because they can't tell the difference. I have some friends that release everything orange to avoid any issues. In southern California the cowcod is similar. In Alaska you can catch shortraker rockfish which also look a lot like yelloweye. Know your regs and know how to ID the fish you catch. www.afsc.noaa.gov/race/media/publications/.../techmemo117.pdf does a pretty good job of pointing out the differences and has decent color pictures too.

    Big_E

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by vaaler View Post
    THAT one works!!! And you're welcome torpedo!
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

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