Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Deer hunting stratigies

  1. #1
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    538

    Default Deer hunting stratigies

    Planning on hunting out of Whittier next weekend on a boat. Having no experience with black tail I was hoping to get some advice on hunting stratigies for this time of year. Should we cruze the shore, walk the shore? Climb high and glass? When do black tail move is it early and late like lots of game? Or is sitting a used trail a usefull tactic. Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,593

    Default

    Deer will still be high. It takes snow to put them on the beaches.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,396

    Default

    Yep, climb high and glass. Since you'll be able to hunt does as of Monday, hunting down low can be productive as well, but deer numbers and the ratio of bucks to does will be better with elevation. Keep your eyes peeled as you move slowly through the timber, though - those things are ghosts and will sometimes appear out of nowhere at very close range.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    Going against popular opinion, Down low is not always bad hunting this time of year, especially if you're meat hunting. For two reasons.

    First, the weather has been extra bad this year. that pushes deer down off the ridges into areas that create a lee or protection from the wind. The backside of ridges from the prevailing wind will have pockets of deer. In the Sound, the prevailing wind is usually East or Southeast so West or Northwest canyons can be good. If the weather improves the deer will eventually end up back on the ridges and mountain tops, some fairly quickly. Sitkas like to bed where they have a good view, so don't overlook the edge of cliffs and steep canyons when glassing.

    The other reason to look low is, this time of year, the older animals basically kick the younger animals out of their territory as part of the pre rut. It's not uncommon this time of year to see small herds of yearlings, spikes, small forkies and does wandering around like they are lost. You will often see them on the beaches and it has nothing to do with snow. Knowledgeable local hunters make meat hunts this time of year hoping to find yearlings on the beach or near it. I've seen this phenomena both on Kodiak and Afognak and in Prince William Sound. As always, low tide is the best time to cruise beaches, especially right at dawn or just before dusk.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    That being said, there may not be many yearlings this year. Last year's fawns were the most likely to die as a result of Snowpocalypse.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

  6. #6

    Default

    My experience with blacktails is very similar to Brian M's. When down low and in thick cover, they can and will hold tight and I've even seen them crawling on their bellies trying to sneak away undetected. If you're walking the deer trails through thick cover, go very quietly and watch for subtle movements out ahead and to the sides. They are fun to hunt.

  7. #7
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    538

    Default

    Thanks guys. I can't wait. I wonder if it showed down there last night. Hopefully the seas are nice next weekend anybody els have any tipsp

  8. #8
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,368

    Default

    I've done very well calling in does with a fawn bleat. Just make sure you've got your back very well covered... there's other predators around who love a tasty fawn snack.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    I've done very well calling in does with a fawn bleat. Just make sure you've got your back very well covered... there's other predators around who love a tasty fawn snack.
    This following story is from Nov of 1988. I was working in Hoonah on Chichigof Is. when this incident occurred. There was a lot more to the story of the recovery of the remains and the killing of the bear. The search party had found pieces of the remains and split up. The leaders kept on while the others remained behind. The leaders had moved to a small ridge next to the one that had those who stayed with the remains, when the bear suddenly charged the group at the remains. Panic broke out, but the second group managed to take the bear down before anyone else was hurt. The bear died very close to those he was charging. The original story as I remember it was that his partners heard him calling, then heard him scream. They ran back to find a blood trail leading from the beach area up the mountain and called for help.

    This is the most detailed account I could find online, but Outdoor life had an article call " Death Came Calling' in their Jan, 1991 issue.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This hunting horror story was reported by United Press International from Sitka, Alaska:

    A 700-pound grizzly bear that killed a hunter and devoured part of the body was felled the next day by the rifles of a search party, state officials said.

    The 6-man party from Sitka and Port Alexander found the mature bear with its partly devoured kill Saturday. The animal charged and was shot dead, said Rollin Young, an Alaska Fish and Wildlife Protection officer.

    "He was shot with six different rifles," Young said. "He was killed 15 feet from the group."

    Harley Sievenpiper Jr., 40, of Juneau, was attacked Friday after he split off from two hunting companions on Baranof Island in southeast Alaska. Young said Sievenpiper may have inadvertently attracted the bear by using a deer whistle.

    "It's a small whistle type thing that imitates a fawn in distress," Young said. "He did have one. Bears have been known to respond to that sound."

    The bear had dragged the body a mile, Young said.

    Young said Sievenpiper's rifle was found, still loaded, with the safety on.

    "He wasn't able to get a shot off," Young said.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

  10. #10
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    538

    Default

    I appreciate the info. Does anybody have any recent reports out of Pws for deer or bear

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by twodux View Post
    It's not uncommon this time of year to see small herds of yearlings, spikes, small forkies and does wandering around like they are lost. Knowledgeable local hunters make meat hunts this time of year hoping to find yearlings on the beach or near it. I've seen this phenomena both on Kodiak and Afognak and in Prince William Sound. As always, low tide is the best time to cruise beaches, especially right at dawn or just before dusk.
    Same phenom happens in SE too - the oldtimers say:
    "Last week of September and you wont see a thing, first week of October and the little ones run the beaches like clockwork"

    I'll be cruising the beaches for a few little forks when I get a chance, and will probably be helping some of the knowledgeable old timers pack theirs back home too. Morning is when I prefer because if you wind up getting one or two the boat ride is still in the light, not quite as safe driving around in the dark - especially in unfamiliar waters.

    Good luck!

  12. #12
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,690

    Default

    Good advice "hoon "

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,892

    Default Deer hunting stratigies

    Hunt high....... I wait till nov. then I fill me freezer from the beach.. Here a picture from last nov. ImageUploadedByTapatalk1349336769.965242.jpg
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

  14. #14
    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    1,272

    Default deer?

    I was out of valdez last weekend for goats, deer and or ducks.. and while climbing for goats I stumbled upon a doe at about 25 yards. she quietly sneaked through the thick spruce.. Couldnt shoot her anyway till Monday, But was encouraging to see her right at the edge of the snow line..

    Last year I kept my eye on the weather all of Oct and Nov to make a run out of whittier with the boat.. Neither month gave me the opportunity weather wise on the weekends when I had time to hunt.. first weekend of Dec proved to be nice, seas were realatively calm, and the snow was deep.. Deer reports were ok.. so I took a couple guys out for a 2 day trip.. I wrote a report last year on it.. in short, we found the deer on or near the beach.. in the same type of terrain in a half dozen different spots.. Im patiently waitng for the snow to fly and the seas to be calm and I'll be back out their again this winter.. they taste delicious, provide excellent table fare and are a pretty deer.. Here are a couple bucks from last years hunt, I caped both of these and plan to do a double floor pedestal mount of them..

    Hoytguy

    100_4830.jpg

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    266

    Default

    Have the does kicked out their fawns by now or do they keep them until next year's rut?

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    433

    Default

    My first time deer hunting everoutnin the sound this past weekend. Saw 5 deer and shot 3. Two bucks and a doe. Other two were does. The party saw around 10 total. Maybe 15 hours actually on the ground. Shot two near 500 ft and another just past the beach a couple hundred yards. Not sure how many are usually out there but.

    I shot one in and avalanche shoot and the other two in meadows as I was glassing or just watching.

    Very cool hunt. Very fun. Loved seeing that new terrain!!

  17. #17

    Default

    Pretty efficient hunting Plenty!

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak char View Post
    Have the does kicked out their fawns by now or do they keep them until next year's rut?
    I saw a few does last week that still had fawns with them, but once rut comes around the does that are ready to mate again might have their fawns chased off by prospective bucks. I've seen some does with fawns during the rut and after the rut, and some does with no fawns before and after- but who's to say they had a fawn to begin with? If you are serious about finding the answer give the bio a ring Phil Mooney does lots of deer stuff around SE. Otherwise only shoot the ones with horns and spend less time pondering doe/fawn

  19. #19
    Member alaska_pike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    big lake
    Posts
    321

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by twodux View Post
    This following story is from Nov of 1988. I was working in Hoonah on Chichigof Is. when this incident occurred. There was a lot more to the story of the recovery of the remains and the killing of the bear. The search party had found pieces of the remains and split up. The leaders kept on while the others remained behind. The leaders had moved to a small ridge next to the one that had those who stayed with the remains, when the bear suddenly charged the group at the remains. Panic broke out, but the second group managed to take the bear down before anyone else was hurt. The bear died very close to those he was charging. The original story as I remember it was that his partners heard him calling, then heard him scream. They ran back to find a blood trail leading from the beach area up the mountain and called for help.

    This is the most detailed account I could find online, but Outdoor life had an article call " Death Came Calling' in their Jan, 1991 issue.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This hunting horror story was reported by United Press International from Sitka, Alaska:

    A 700-pound grizzly bear that killed a hunter and devoured part of the body was felled the next day by the rifles of a search party, state officials said.

    The 6-man party from Sitka and Port Alexander found the mature bear with its partly devoured kill Saturday. The animal charged and was shot dead, said Rollin Young, an Alaska Fish and Wildlife Protection officer.

    "He was shot with six different rifles," Young said. "He was killed 15 feet from the group."

    Harley Sievenpiper Jr., 40, of Juneau, was attacked Friday after he split off from two hunting companions on Baranof Island in southeast Alaska. Young said Sievenpiper may have inadvertently attracted the bear by using a deer whistle.

    "It's a small whistle type thing that imitates a fawn in distress," Young said. "He did have one. Bears have been known to respond to that sound."

    The bear had dragged the body a mile, Young said.

    Young said Sievenpiper's rifle was found, still loaded, with the safety on.

    "He wasn't able to get a shot off," Young said.
    hoonah/chichagoff island has the highest concentration of brown bears per square mile than anywhere else in the world,..you shoot a deer or fire a weapon you best watch your back these bears come running as if a dinner bell has gone off

  20. #20
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    Here is my theory for really rainy conditions. Deer like steep hillsides with oldgrowth timber and blueberry browse. The steep hillsides run water off better than anywhere. The Blueberry creates a noise barrier for bedding zones. Nothing moves in on a blueberry thicket without creating a fuss. The browse from the berry bush is a great food source. The bucks will be finding the happy spots where the does like to hang out. Pinch points in geography also are good locations for Sitka hunting. Canyons, cliff bottoms, valleys, ridgelines ect....will funnel animal movement. Pay attentions to the sign. Some areas that had been productive will loose favor. Don't ignore the sign and move until you find it. Once you find it hunt with your eyes not with your boots. Camo helps. Get yourself concealed and work the wind. If you don't have the wind in your favor you don't stand much of a chance. Shoot strait and get to work. Happy Hunting!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •