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Thread: Your favorite Lingcod recipes?

  1. #1
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    Default Your favorite Lingcod recipes?

    What's your favorite Lingcod recipe?

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    Supporting Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Broil it with lemon butter
    Alaskan Bowhunters Association
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    Anchorage, AK 99502

  3. #3

    Default Lings

    Maybe we did something wrong, but we got lingcod on a charter out of Seward a couple of years ago (about 50 or so miles out, BTW) and when we thawed it for dinner about a month later, it was not good. We took good care of the fish, vacuum sealed it, etc. (no skin) but it tasted pretty fishy; we prepared halibut at the same time at a party, but everybody went for the halibut and thumbs down to the lingcod. Can't remember how we fixed it; I hear people rant & rave about lings, but what's up? Obviously something's fishy, pun intended! The charter did not bleed the fish, but seems like most charter outfits don't do it anyways. I would like to catch them again, but I'm a little leary about the effort & expense and being disappointed with the taste.
    Jim

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    Default On the deck...

    That fish (like so many others) should be bled, gutted and immediately iced.
    Summer in AK is getting noticiably warmer, and heaven help any catch that is not immdiately attended.

    I give the lingcod a #1 rating for superior taste. Perhaps you should try it again if you are fortunate enough to bring it on board...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Unfortunately most charters simply drop the catch in an uncooled hold, and don't bleed/gut the fish immediately. Hence the taste of the fish isn't nearly as good as if the catch had been properly handled.

    I've poached, broiled and bear batter fried ling cod, all very good stuff!

    One last point, lings are a delicate fish and shouldn't be kept in the freezer too long.

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    Default Lingcod is A+++

    Just bleed them and they are great.

    Blackend or beer batter.
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    beer batter
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    **Triple-dipped breading and deep-fried (obviously it's rarely a cardiologist's favorite choice..) (This is the same sort of thing we do for deep-fried halibut as well)..
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Take fillets, and cut into deep-frying size pieces, whether they be 'fingers,' or fillets large enough to cover a kaiser roll for a good fish sandwich.

    Pat the fillets dry with a paper towell, or just let drain on a tray while you cut the rest of your fillets and mix other ingredients.

    (*note, we've not written this down, really, and I often cook by sight, so this is mostly approximations).

    (*Also, this recipe is most easily put together by a team of three family members or guests, using forks for each stage; otherwise fingers &/or forks will likely grow in size each time a piece of fish is handled.)

    1.) In first bowl of three, mix approx. 1 cup flour and 1 cup parmesan cheese with black pepper & salt to desired taste. You can add a bit of onion powder to this bowl if desired as well; perhaps 2-3 tsp.

    2.) In 2nd bowl of 3, mix 4-5 beaten eggs, several TBSP. of lemon juice or ime juice. Salt and pepper to taste.

    3.) In 3rd bowl, place combination of crumbs; I prefer corn flakes, perhaps just a touch of fine corn meal and whole wheat flour, some saltines or ritz, and/or perhaps some potatoe chip crumbs either form left-over chips, or a freshly-'destroyed' bag of crushed chips.(*Salt if deemed necessary or desireable; usually the contents of this bowl don't require any add'l salt, but that's a matter of what combination of crumbs were used, and, again, personal taste preferences.)

    (It's a matter of adjusting for personal preference and taste throughout this recipe, btw.)

    *Have an extra plate handy to arrange the fish pieces on while the deep-fryer heats up.
    -------------------------------------------------------
    Dip the BONELESS pieces of fish into the bowl of flour and parmesan cheese, and, with a fork, toss 'til well-coated.

    Pass the piece(s) to the 2nd bowl, containing the egg and lemon or lime juice, dropping into the egg liquid (without touching the 1st bowl's fork to the egg..... consider it a 'Monk-like' thing. ;^>) )

    Use 2nd fork to thoroughly coat the piece with the egg mix, and, if desired, you can repeat the flour and egg dipping another time or so. *Repeating the first two steps results in a somewhat thicker breading..

    After the final egg-mix dipping, pass the pieces with fork from 2nd bowl to bowl of crumbs, where a third fork is used to toss crumbs onto the recently-'egged' piece of fish.

    Gently lay pieces of properly and thoroughly-breaded fish in loose single layer onto plate and, when deep-frying grease is hot, place proper number of pieces (for your specific deep-fryer) into 375 degree f.+ deep-fat-frying grease until cooked, crispy, light brown, but not over-done or rubbery. (**Too many pieces at once will often lower temp of grease to point of 'sogging' the breading, so take your time.)
    -----------------------------------------------------
    We make a home-made tartar sauce sauce with mayonaise (perhaps a cup or so, depending on desired amount), sweet pickle relish (1/4 to 1/3, roughly, whatever volume of mayo was used), a touch of ketchup (perhaops roughly a TBSP), a slight amount of -prepared- yellow mustard such as French's (maybe a tsp), some creamed horse radish (I use about 2-3 TBSP, but that's me; be careful with the horse radish as not everyone's a fan), sometimes a dash of hot sauce (several drops of tobasco or similar works good), some soy sauce (perhaps a TBSP +/-) and some worchestershire sauce (couple of brief 'glugs,' or perhaps a TBSP or slightly less of this as well), some lemon or lime juice (in slight amount such as TBSP +/-), either freshly fine-grated or food-processed sweet onion, and freshly pressed garlic or granulated garlic, and some dill.

    *I imagine that by now some are likely thinking that this sounds like a 'kitchen-sink' tartar sauce recipe (as in, 'everything, including the .....', but my family finds this tasty when completed.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    Either dip freshly-deep-fried fish directly into small bowls of the tartar sauce, or spread onto kaisers for cod fillet sandwiches.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    O.k., now I'm hungry and it's snack time...
    ---------------------------------------------------

    ruffle

  9. #9

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    Geez, I'm drooling!
    When's fishing time?

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    >>>Geez, I'm drooling!
    When's fishing time?<<<

    Hopefully around Summer Solstice if all of my various projects don't flat-out break the piggy bank, and we can arrange the time with everyone interested. ;^>)

    We went the 3rd week of May last year, and it was -way- too early. Got some serious quantities of various rock fish (china rocks, yellow eyes, and black sea bass; especially the black sea bass), and a limited amount of halibut. I broke some brand new 150 lb. test line on a fish that I got greedy with, and tried to horse up; he was going down, while I was going up, sitting right next to Seal Rocks, and a bit to the S.W. Beautiful near-flat calm.... AND I LET MY GIANT 'BUT GET AWAY!!!!

    The sound of the line snapping was like a .22 rifle. I thought for sure that I'd shattered my rod.. Nope...

    <ruffle still kicks self -hard- in posterior when telling of that moment of short-lived bragging, reminding self for future purposes of the unlikelihood of out-wrestling what was likely a 300+ lb fish, freshly hooked, not yet tired, and now probably wearing one heck of a nose ring...>

    But one of our partners caught a quite memorable ling cod that day; worth a bragging picture.. He's a strong healthy feller, and the ling was held over his shoulder, and was indeed of impressive size.

    Did I mention that I HATE losing large fish??!! Especially to my own ignorance, and most especially when said ignorance is demonstrated in front of others??!!

    "Lighten the drag, grasshopper. When you can sense the tireness of your fish and use it to your advantage, you may move forward.."

    ruffle
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 04-24-2007 at 22:04. Reason: Spelling

  11. #11
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    If ling cod is handled on the deck correctly it doesnt much matter how it's cooked, it's awesome! In fact with both lings and Halibut I like to get my first taste on the water sushi style yummy!

    Rick P

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    Default small pieces

    The only gripe I've ever had about lingcod is some folks cut HUGE pieces and cook them (I mean realy thick and say3 inches by 3 inches.. It is a personal thing, but I like smaller pieces when cooking.

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    >>>The only gripe I've ever had about lingcod is some folks cut HUGE pieces and cook them (I mean realy thick and say3 inches by 3 inches.. It is a personal thing, but I like smaller pieces when cooking.<<<

    When I'm deep-frying, I'll leave the fillet at full thickness if I'm slicing off narrow 'fingers' from the fillet.

    But if I'm doing larger fillets for a nice piece to fill up a kaiser roll, I cut the larger piece from the fillet, perhaps 4" x 4" or even 5" x 5", but then take the knife on a horizontal plane and bisect that piece, so that it gives you two pieces of the same area dimensions, but half the thickness. Or else, if the filllet is thick enough, take two thinner vertical slices from the end of it, the thickness you want your fillets in your sandwich, and pair them up on the straight (typically skin-side) edges. In -all- cases, however, the skin was previously removed...

    ruffle

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    Cut into chunks, beer battered with Old Bay seasoning mixed in, coated with panko breading and deep fried.
    Now what ?

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    i like fish that taste a bit like fish....therefore I give my halibut to fishing partners and I keep lingcod, yelloweyes and black rockfish.....I cut fillets into strips of less than 3/4" or thin fillets.....coat in olive oil and sprinkle with Citrus Grill [Sam's Club].....bake in oven or grill.....maybe some sun-dried tomatoes on top.....

  16. #16

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    I cut mine in thin strips, dredge in eggwash and seasoned flour and lightly sautee until done. Pretty simple but its what we like.

  17. #17

    Default Resurrection of an old thread. . .

    (Go ahead, if you must, with the 'thread dredge pic!)

    So here I am along the waters of Resurrection Bay, with my quota of freshly caught lingcod wondering how best to prepare it.
    I 'Googled' it (is that now a proper verb?) and it brought me to this thread!

    Ruffle - thank you for the attention to detail in your instructions... almost 'blonde-proof!'

    I am just curious, in the two years that have lapsed since this thread's inception -- any new combos or favorites amongst the members?

    Thanks in Advance!

    Happy 4th of July Weekend to All!
    Doc

  18. #18
    Member dandeo2003's Avatar
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    Default the recipe I like best

    Is where someone else cooks it! I don't care how it's cooked, lingcod is great. Although I think when it is cooked with little seasoning put on a stick and cooked over a campfire shortly after getting back to shore is the beat.
    Quote Originally Posted by Emu View Post
    What's your favorite Lingcod recipe?
    Learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.

  19. #19

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    Well, this one might be in here somewhere, and I'm sure it's in the halibut thread at least once, but this is what I use for all my deep fried fish these days.

    -fish
    -batter mix
    -additional seasonings
    -Panko

    Take any basic batter mix (I've used onion ring batter, beer batter, pancake mix [all that was available], etc.) and mix it thin...now, thin is relative, but you don't want it as thick as you'd use it if it were your sole coating.

    Then, season up that mix with your favorite fish seasoning - I like lemon pepper, though I'll sometimes mix it with any other blend of fish seasoning or just dump in some extra garlic powder and pepper. Taste the batter. It needs to be much saltier and seasoned than normal, since with the thinner batter there will be less on it, and the Panko is usually unseasoned.

    Fill a large shallow bowl with Panko or other Japanese breadcrumbs. Using one hand, dip a piece of fish in the batter, and lay it in the Panko. Using the other hand, cover the fish with Panko and roll it to completely coat it. Lay fish out on a pan/cookie sheet/etc. Repeat...

    When you have as much as you want to cook, fry away. I've found that the finger-type pieces up to 1"x1"x however long you like will cook in 2 minutes. Thinner pieces even less.

    What I really like about this, is that you can lay out literally 10 pounds of fish if you want, stacked up on a couple or three sheets. The bread crumbs eliminate the batter mess you often get with beer battering. I've even put a pan of coated fish in the fridge and pulled it out to cook a couple of days later.

    This gives an awesome crunchy final product. It may take a time or two for you to get down how much seasoning and how thin to make the batter, but it's not rocket science, and wide varieties work well.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  20. #20
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    RSKY BIZ,

    Since the hibernation of this thread, I've had to modify my diet for medical reasons.

    Problem is, I still like to eat what I like to eat, so I've had to change some of my preferred cooking style, and increase the use of spices some; not that spices weren't a star attraction in cooking before, but now they're a life saver of sorts.

    That said, in cooking some fat lake trout fillets from a LARGE laker that 'we' caught this past winter, I reverted back to basics, making sure that, 1.) either the fillets are thin enough to cook all the way through under the broiler, or, 2.) they finish cooking in the oven -after- the initial subtle 'crisping' of the fish under the broiler.

    We did the following:

    Lay out fillets on a greased broiler rack (using either canola oil, pam spray, olive oil spray, or olive oil on a paper towel to grease the broiler rack) Line the tray underneath the broiler rack with tin foil in order to make the clean-up later on a bit easier.

    Drizzle olive oil over the fillets, meat side up. Squirt trickles of either lime juice or lemon juice somewhat liberally over the meat side of the fillets. Sprinkle on dill and black pepper. If you like, you can add a touch of garlic or fresh grated onion, but be conservative with either one, as the taste of the fish is more delicate, and easily buried under too much spice.

    Some finely crushed or pulverized hot red pepper scattered to what ever degree is desired is also a good addition at this point..

    Place broiler tray with fillets meat-side-up under a hot broiler, and let cook until the edges of the meat and skin are turning crispy golden brown.

    If your fillets are too thick, and the flesh, when slightly opened with a fork, still has that raw translucent appearance, the turn off the broiler, and continue baking at 350 f. to 375 f. for just a bit more time. Adding a slight second glazing of olive oil before the final baking will help preserve the moisture that proper broiling would otherwise preserve.

    you can also top this fish, toward the end of the cooking, with a sprinkling of asiago, romano or parmesan cheese, to let just barely turn golden brown

    You can eat this as a main course with no sauce, or, if desired, use the home-made tartar sauce, or another sauce of your liking.

    Some salsas go quite well with this style fish too.

    Cheers!

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