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Thread: Seven Mountain Ranges, Seven Rams, Two Legs

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    Default Seven Mountain Ranges, Seven Rams, Two Legs

    I killed my first ram in 1998 on my very first sheep hunt. Miraculously, I drew the premier tag in the entire state the first time I applied. Despite a paucity of Alaskan hunting experience and appropriate gear, I was successful. Honestly, I hadnít a clue what I was doing. Iíd never killed anything bigger than a spike buck up to that point. I know that ram was a gift from God that helped set me on a path I didnít know I needed to walk.

    My next serious attempt at sheep was in 2001. A couple more years of Alaskan wilderness experience and sheep knowledge gave me more confidence heading into the mountains, but I knew I was still a newbie. I managed to take my second ram and felt like I halfway knew what I was doing. Maybe I could be a sheep hunterÖ

    In 2002 I hunted the Kenai Mountains. I couldnít find a legal ram and the momentum from the year prior began to wane. Little did I know at the time the role the Kenai Mountains would play in my journey.

    2003 was the turning point of my hunting career and in some respects, my life. I received a sure-fire tip about a spot in the White Mountains that held legal rams. The kicker -- Iíd have to walk over 30 miles to get there. It would be a test. Did I have what it would take? If I could succeed on this hunt, I could truly place myself among the ranks of accomplished sheep hunters. The hunt for that ram was the toughest thing Iíd done to this point. I was now fully on this sheep hunting path, the wheels were in motion for an awesome friendship, and a unique sheep hunting goal was brewing.

    As I prepared for the 2004 season I began giving serious thought to my identity as a sheep hunter. I wanted to do something big. What could I do to become an elite sheep hunter? And how could I hunt in a way that I felt was respectful and honored this magnificent animal I had grown to appreciate and so identify with? I knew I didnít have the resources to target exceptionally large rams or go for the coveted ďGrand SlamĒ (the taking of all four species of North American sheep). Over time, an idea began to take shapeÖ

    Former Alaska Department of Fish and Game Dall sheep researcher Wayne Heimerís research played a prominent role as I built my knowledge of sheep biology. A paper Heimer wrote comparing horn growth between rams from Alaskaís seven major mountain ranges -- the Wrangells, Alaska, Brooks, Talkeetna, Kenai, Chugach and Tanana Hills/White Mountains -- stirred something inside me. I also thought about how so many sheep hunters are successful by going to the same place every year and by using ATVís, airplanes and boats to penetrate deep into sheep country and to separate themselves from the competition. Although I didnít necessarily have a problem with others using them, these motorized access tools were unavailable to me at the time. To date, all my rams had been from different places and taken by hiking in from the road. This realization and the seven mountain ranges concept coalesced into a supreme Dall sheep hunting challenge that, to my knowledge, had never been achieved. Could a hunter without aid of a motorized vehicle (besides a pick-up truck to get to a trailhead) and without scouting ahead with an airplane, kill a ram from all seven of these mountain ranges? Iíd already bagged a Tanana Hills/White Mountains ram, arguably the hardest range from which to take a walk-in ram. The challenge resonated with me. It would be the Alaska Slam. To prove that a hunter could, with enough dedication, kill a ram from anywhere in Alaska, and on the ramsí terms -- on foot. I decided then. The Quest was on.

    In 2004, I returned to the Kenai Mountains. Again, I could find no legal rams. I abandoned the hunt partway through. With only a couple days left to hunt, I needed to go somewhere else. So I headed back to the location of my 2001 ram in the Wrangell Mountains. That ram I call the 48-hour ram. Forty-eight hours from truck to truck with a full-curl. It felt like quite an accomplishment within the scope of the larger goal. Two mountain ranges down. But the Kenai Mountains continued to vex me.

    My future hunting partner Scott, on my tip, went to the White Mountains spot in 2004 and was also successful. After Scottís successful audition, we teamed up for the first time in 2005 for an attempt at the Brooks Range. We found only one legal ram. Iíd killed three, Scott only one. I wasnít able to check off the Brooks Range that year, but we solidified the kind of friendship that rarely comes along in a manís life.

    In 2006 my name came up again for the famed Tok Management Area, the only place in Alaska specifically managed for large-horned rams. Scott and I had put in on a party tag. By now Scott was on board with the mountain range goal. It was the first time we doubled up on rams. We now each had three ranges checked off. Me: White Mountains, Wrangells, Alaska Range. Scott: White Mountains, Brooks and Alaska Range.

    In 2007 my streak continued as I drew a very rare tag in the Hunter Creek drainage of Chugach State Park, outside of Anchorage. I hunted solo this time. I had thought my 2003 White Mountains hunt was hard. This was more survival than hunting. It took me five days to pack that ram out on bleeding feet, after enduring a storm that would have made CNN had it occurred anywhere in the Lower 48. Chugach range: check. Over halfway there.

    2008 found Scott and I back together north of the Arctic Circle attempting to secure a Brooks Range ram for me. I took my best ram ever, a 12-year old broomed monarch. Scott got a good one as well. Only the Kenai and Talkeetna Mountains remained to complete my goal. But a long, sweeping pair of horns that got away kept us dreaming of the Brooks all year long. We put the seven mountain ranges goal on hold in 2009 for a ďReturn to Ram NationĒ and an attempt at that haunting ram. It was a good decision, as Scott killed him and I killed another great broomed ram.

    For 2010 we were back on track for the goal. The Kenaiís had been my nemesis. Diligent summer scouting by Scott turned up several very promising rams, but the hunt proved otherwise. Several were oh-so-close to being full-curl, but we couldnít bring ourselves to pull the trigger on any of them. Itís the only time weíve gone home empty-handed, but we learned a lot about ourselves as hunters and our personal ethics. Scott did a late season run to the Wrangellís and bested my 48-hour ram by one hour.

    Fourth time was the charm in 2011 for the Kenai Range. Back to the same spot as last year, facing impossible odds, we finally doubled up on not just legal, but really nice Kenai rams. A walk-in/double on the Kenai rarely, if ever occurs. The Kenai Mountains had become such a burden. It was with light hearts only a heavy pack can bring that we hiked back to the truck that year.

    2012. Somewhere in the Talkeetna Mountains the ram that represented the culmination of my goal grazed unaware. It took 65 miles of hiking and 30,000 feet of climbing to find him. Scott, though it was his turn to have first shot, deferred to me (as I said before, a once-in-a-lifetime friend) in order to complete a goal ten years in the making: seven mountain ranges, seven rams, two legs.

    Scott still has the Talkeetna and Chugach Ranges left. Heíll have first shot until his goal is completed. There will be much celebration in the hills when that happens. Hopefully weíll be the first two sheep hunters to complete the seven mountain ranges goal. It would be fitting given our work together on this.

    The accomplishment of such a goal brings great satisfaction. But as I reflect on the past ten years I canít help but linger more on the path the pursuit has led me on. I have heard the voice of God and seen His nature revealed more clearly in the mountains than anywhere else. Iíve made life-long friends that I wouldnít have otherwise. Iíve been confronted with my biggest weaknesses and greatest strengths. Iíve learned lessons in handling conflict and adversity. Iíve learned when to sacrifice for others and when to stand up for myself. Iíve been given confirmation that things I hoped were in me, really were. The mountains have humbled me to my knees when I started to get too cocky and then blessed me with rewards I didnít deserve. Iíve had the privilege of witnessing othersí personal journeys as I helped them pursue their sheep goals. I know that the man I am is much different than the man I would be had I not taken up the pursuit of mountain sheep, and that is the real trophy value in every set of horns Iíve collected.
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  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Wow - that is just spectacular! Seriously, thank you for taking the time to share that with us.


    Quote Originally Posted by Fullcurl View Post
    I know that the man I am is much different than the man I would be had I not taken up the pursuit of mountain sheep, and that is the real trophy value in every set of horns Iíve collected.

    My very first ram came from a walk-in hunt in the Kenai Mountains. I was 20 years old and didn't have a clue as to what I was doing. That hunt stretched me in ways I had never been stretched before. What I got out of it is exactly what you describe above. Well put, sir.

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    That's called the "Alaska Slam." Congrats!

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    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    That last paragraph couldn't have been said any better. Simply awesome!

  5. #5

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    Nice work! I think we all remember hearing about a walk in double in the Kenai Range. You really have accomplished something amazing, and I applaud you. This is the most well written story I've read on this forum. I would love to see some photos of your previous rams....

  6. #6

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    Great post, and congratulations on your accomplishment!
    Jason
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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Amazing! I can't even come up with strong words for my awe. The journey must have been fantastic. I've been in the Brooks, Alaska, Talketnas, and Chugach now. To do it via foot is beautifully insane!

    Congrats on a fine signature accomplishment!!

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Default Seven Mountain Ranges, Seven Rams, Two Legs

    Quite possibly the best read through one hunters eyes.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  9. #9

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    Amazingly well written story of your sheep hunting life. Thank you for taking the time to write that, it's one of the best posts I've read on a forum. You're beyond hard-core, that's for sure. Congratulations on getting the Alaska Slam on your own two feet and muscle power.

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    Fullkurl, you're a testament to the 10% rule. Nice job, impressive accompolishment. Thanks for sharing the journey.
    Mike
    www.coffmancoveak.com
    Prince of Wales Island

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Fullcurl thats an amazing accounting o your sheep experiences! My hats off to you and your hunting partner and I hope the two of you have many more enjoyable hunts!

  12. #12

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    Thank you for sharing that inspiring story! That's quite an impressive accomplishment you've acheived and your parnter is right on your heels. Maybe sometime you could post the photos of your rams in chronological order and what range each came from. Again, very nice.

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    Default Seven Mountain Ranges, Seven Rams, Two Legs

    What an awesome accomplishment! Congrats & thanks for a great write up to go with

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    Very nicely done I hope to get my first Ram next season!

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    Awesome!!!! Your story is nothing less than inspiring. Thank you.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Well done and well told. Knowing you and Scott is something I have always considered a privilege. Thanks for giving all of us a peek into this, a significant part of your lives. I think all of us feel a sense of kinship with you. I hope you will share more of this amazing and truly remarkable journey with us!

    -Mike
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    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Awesome accomplishment sir, simply amazing story. thank you for sharing
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  18. #18

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    Great stuff. Congratulations and thanks for sharing the story. Could you post pictures of the rams with which range they came from? Thanks again!

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    You are to be congratulated for sure and I can't thank you enough for sharing your life time achievement with the rest of us. Hopefully it won't take you too long to help your friend accomplish the same feat. Yes, God has truly given you a gift in the journey, isn't it strange how he works sometimes? I love the fact that you have the wisdom to see that. I think that is where many of us fall short, myself included but I'm working on that. Your words share a wisdom that needs to be shared and you do that well, thanks again and I hope that someday I get the chance to meet you. I have 3 1/2 years before I can make my first attempt so I will continue to read your words of wisdom and hopefully a little will run off.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Ditto what tboehm said - its one thing to let us all look into your head as you travel, but you also let us into your heart - class act young man for sure!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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