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Thread: Your most memorable hunt...?

  1. #1

    Default Your most memorable hunt...?

    Hey guys,
    I know right now is the time where new memories are being made but I thought it would be cool for us to share our most memorable hunt so far. Please share. I'll start...

    It was October 2000. I hadn't hunted much that fall and as the marsh was starting to freeze I wanted to give it a go one last time. My buddy suggested we try Maude Rd. I had never been there.
    We got there at O-Dark-Thirty and there was a little snow cover and the marsh was frozen. All we had was my Coleman Scanoe and little 3 HP motor. Luckily a party with a big mud boat launched and plowed through the ice to points unknown. My little 3 horse would have nothing to do with all those ice chunks but we tried to follow the big boats trail anyway. We didn't get far. It was way to hard going and my little motor was taking a beating.
    I think we ended up about 200 yards or so from the ramp and the sun was starting to come up. I didn't realize we had been trying to get through the ice for so long. So I remembered reading in a mag somewhere about busting open a hole in the ice and shoving the sheet of ice under the main ice to get it out of the way. We walked in a big circle and broke open a hole about 10 yards wide and shoved the ice out of the way.
    I tossed a handful of mallard dekes in the hole, a few Canada shells on the edge of the ice and a Baby Mojo.
    Then the magic began! Holy cow!
    I swear every duck within 10 miles dropped into that little hole in the ice. We had flocks of 15-20 Mallards dropping in. We had whistlers, bluebills, bufflehead. I couldn't believe it!
    We both had our limit in less than an hour. Unbelievable!
    Now here's a funny part to the story, sort of. My poor wife woke up sick as hell that morning, she had the flu something fierce, fever, vomit, the works. Plus we had a 2 year old at home she had to take care of. So she was calling me every 10-15 minutes with the "are you coming home yet?", "I'm dying!"...
    Well like I said, we limited fast so we packed up and got out of there.
    I get home and my wife is dying from the flu, the kid needs to be looked after so I just leave my limit of fat greenheads on the front porch to be dealt with the next morning.
    Here's another "funny" part. I go out the next morning to retrieve my ducky feast and they're all gone!!
    There is nothing but a couple feathers and a blood spot. I look around a little and see there is a fox trail in the snow from my porch to the woods across the street. That little bugger took my ducks, one bye one, and toted them off to his/her den!
    Man! What and end to the best hunt I have ever had.

    JM

  2. #2
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    good thread and good story..to think that fox got to feed his family..nice

    got way to many first...going to have to give this some thought before I write one up...got two that come to mind...
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    Gen.1:26
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    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Like DH01, I would have a hard time zeroing down on one most memorable hunt, although specifically with waterfowl, I will say that I grew up hunting with my father and my two older brothers. We are a pretty close group, despite the fact that we're scattered out all over the US, nobody living within a few hours of another. We had some good successes through the years, and PLENTY of strike-outs, but it was always awesome hunting with the bros.

    When we hunted with my dad in the duck marsh, it always seemed like my dad brought several of his buddies, so we always split up. We knew the ins and outs of the marsh, so one of us would have to take some buddies to one blind, so on and so forth. The last autumn I spent in NY before moving to AK that January, I said that for the first time, I wanted to hunt with my two brothers in one blind and let my dad and his buddies populate our other two blinds.

    The ducks showed up that morning, and so did my bros and I. We got our limit early and spent the rest of the time trash-talking the other guys over the walkie talkies. Here's a pic:

    (I was fatter then and no beard, before being "Alaskanized" ) I do miss wood ducks, and I sure miss hunting with my brothers.

    Two years ago, the three of us drove up the Haul Road on a week-long caribou hunt, which was also definitely one of the most special and memorable hunts of my life. But, of course, that belongs in a different sub-forum, hehe. -Gr
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    We woke up at 3:30 AM on Christmas morning. My older brother Billy, my nephew Trenton, my Dad, and I. We didn't even look at presents under the tree, or any of the food left over in the fridge from the feast the night before. We went straight to our waders and parkas. Dad had us load the decoys, life jackets, and camo netting in the boat. After we had grabbed the guns, ammo and dog, we hitched the boat to Dad's old 59 Willys Station Wagon and took off.

    It was a cold morning, and the windshield started to fog up. The defroster in that car only defrosted a spot about the size of a dinner plate. So Dad looked kinda funny looking through the small hole that he could see out of. He even stuck his head out the window a few times to see the corners coming up. After about 35 minutes we arrived at the small lake we planned on hunting.

    After the boat was launched, we had a 5 minute boat ride out to the point we were going to hunt. We dropped off the dog, camo net, all the gear, and my nephew. Dad had me and Billy putting out decoys. Dad would always start getting a little grouchy if we took too long to get them into a spot he designated as a place a decoy was going to sit so we learned to get them unwrapped really quick. We used a really big spread for that lake, usually around 130 decoys, so it took us a about an hour or so to put them all out. After we had finished, Dad dropped me and Billy off and he took off around the corner to hide the boat in the brush. Me and Billy got started on building a blind and putting out goose shells.

    Now some people think building a blind just means taking some brush and piling it in front of you. That was not the case with us. We built intricate forts everytime we went out. We had to get out really early to beat the other guys to our spots so we had about an hour and a half before shooting light therefore, we had plenty of time to build a good one. We usually stuck four poles in the ground and two or 3 smaller ones in front of the four. We ran camo netting around the four poles, then ran another sheet on the top, and one along the front along the three smaller ones. Then we would gather all the grass, and sticks and branches we could find and pile it on. It made a box, with a sheet up to our chests in front. You couldn't even see the blind from the other side of the pond. By the time we had finished building the blind we had about 20 minutes until we were legal to shoot.

    The funniest thing was watching Jake, our yellow lab. He was in what we called his hunting mode. He didn't want to be petted, didn't want to fetch, or even talked to. If you tried to pet him, he would grunt, then get up and walk down the bank and sit about 20 feet from you. All he wanted to do was sit there and watch the decoys to make sure no ducks landed in there. If one did come in, it was really hard to contain his excitement. He would sit there shaking and whining because he wanted to get it so bad. This particular morning we had 3 teal land in the decoys and Jake was going nuts. They eventually took off after a few minutes, and we managed to get Jake in the blind, along with my Dad, Brother, and Nephew.

    Shooting time came, and we had a flock of about 30 bluebills come in. We all fired and had 4 sitting on the water, Dad was famous for getting doubles on those birds you had to watch what species they were really early in the morning. The limit on Bluebills those days was 4 per day, so Dad had to be careful from that point on. Luckily the next group that came in was a flock of about 150 mallards! They cupped and swooped over the decoys. We opened up and more birds on the water. The funny thing was, out of all those mallards, I had managed to shoot the only spoony in the entire flock (I was and still am famous for that)! About 10 minutes later we had a flock of 20 widgeon come in. We opened up and more birds on the water. By this time Dad only had 2 birds to go before he was limited out, I had 4 to go, and Billy had 4 as well. We then had a short lull in birds coming in.

    My nephew Trenton was starting to get a little bored in the 30 minutes we had between flocks. My brother had given him a Red Rider BB gun the night before, and he was excited to try and shoot a bird with it. He saw a Swallow land on a branch about 50 yards behind the blind and desperately wanted to go get it. My brother got tired of hearing him beg so he told him "fine, go get it!". It was very funny to see a 8 year old boy stalking up on a swallow with his gun at the ready and a yellow lab right behind him ready to fetch up whatever he was about to go shoot. I really wish I had a camera for that, because it is one of the most memorable images I have ever seen. One rookie hunter and one veteran stalking that bird. Trenton got about 10 feet away when the bird flushed. He raised up and shot and missed it by about a mile. We were all laughing as he came back to the blind but he had gotten his first taste of hunting birds.

    A few minutes later we started hearing some distant honking! GEESE!!! Coming low, We had about 60 goose shells set up behind us so we had a chance of getting them in. Dad got to work on his goose call (the greatest goose caller I know) and soon had the geese turned and headed our way. As they got closer, we all emptied our guns of our duck loads, and loaded up our 3" BBBs. They were coming closer and closer, about 300 yards to go now. We all started holding our breath, butterflies started flying around in my stomach. 100 yards out, starting to get more excited. Suddenly they flare! Then fly off to the left and out over the freeway. We all look at each other like, What the heck just happened. We look back at the dog, and there he is standing with his white tail wagging back and fourth. We think the geese saw his tail wagging and flared off. It's happened more than once. Oh well we said, back to duck hunting, swich out our loads back to 2 3/4 #2s.

    About 10 minutes later another flock of mallards come in. We open up and Dad gets one more, I miss, and Billy knocks another down. As Jake is out retrieving we see a pair come in. Me and Dad open up and we both get one. Me and him were sitting there asking each other what those birds were. I thought they were bluebills, Dad thought they may have been Canvasbacks. Jake had finished up on the mallards, and we set him out on those mystery ducks. As he grabbed the drake, and got closer I saw a chestnut colored head and a long sloping bill. It was a canvasback! A very rare bird in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Dad had shot the drake and I had shot the hen. It was my first canvasback, and other than my first duck it was the most memorable bird I have shot. As the morning progressed I had shot another bluebill, and two more mallards. It was the first limit I had ever shot. My brother Billy finished up his limit with 2 widgeon, and a teal. It was the best shoot we had that year, and one of the rare times we got 3 limits in the valley.

    As we picked up the decoys and tore down the blind me and Dad talked about getting the pair of canvasbacks mounted. But he didn't have the extra money, so we ended up breasting them out. We got home and my Sister was going crazy. My Stepmom would not let her open presents until we got home, so she had to just sit there and look at them all morning. When we got all of our hunting clothes off, Dad handed me a long thin box and said Merry Christmas boy. I opened it up to find a brand new H&R Single shot 12 gauge. Dad had loaned me his 870 for my first year of hunting but wanted me to shoot the single so I would learn to take time with my shots. It was the first and only gun he has ever bought me. I still cherish that gun to this day. It was the perfect end to the best hunt I have ever had.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  5. #5
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Thats a good one brother..brings back some great memories. Thanks for sharing
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    My lab is almost 12. My last hunt with him is most memorable, until the next one, because I never know which will truly be his last one.
    His first one was pretty good too.
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

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    From Alaska, I have two that rank up there with the most memorable.

    One was with another forum member three years ago on DL. I hunted ice in Kansas for years, and love hunting it. He had mentioned that when the ice hits DL that the season is over..I explained to him how great it can be and how the birds for miles around will lock up and come right in. It can be an awesome site to witness. After some coaxing.. I got him to drag his 12ft aluminum boat and 6hpmm to RS. We loaded up and broke thin ice to the lake. Upon arrival..he walked over to DL and while walking on the ice almost decided it was too thick and might damage the boat getting us to where we needed to go.. I continued to coax him into the idea that the shallower the water was the thicker the ice would be..once we got out onto the main lake that the wind and temps would keep the ice thin. We took off busting our way through the ice slowly but surely we moved forward..he would holler at me to look up front and check to see if it was bending the boat..or if water was coming in on the bottom as he focused on the path he had memorized and had traveled so many times in the dark..once convinced the thinner ice was not damaging the boat he pushed the throttle and we continued to manage our way through the ice...the noise was horrible and extremely loud for 430 in the morning.

    Once we got the spot..he explained to me that he had limited experience in hunting the ice.. I took lead and busted a hole while he set up the boat blind and got some things organized in the boat. I walked a circle and cleared out about a 25yard diameter hole..dropped about 40 decoys in it and worked my way back to the boat. Even 30 mins before shooting time we had ducks in the spread, when trigger time came it was game on! I think we limited out on Greenheads, pintails, BH, Scaup, Widgeon in about 30 mins...he could not get over how fast that had happened and how perfect of a hunt it had been..even while we were picking up decoys..birds will still trying to land on us..was crazy..but a very memorable hunt here in AK. We still reminisce this day as one of our best together out on the marsh. We have had some great shoots since then..but that one sticks in my mind and will for a long time...we took allot of pictures that day of the spider web shattered ice where the birds had hit...along with the long trails we had broke in the ice walking to get those that hit the ice at 30mph and slid 50 yards....great times indeed.


    The second one in AK would be when I introduced two fellow workers and good friends to the waterfowling sport. One had been with me many times and had already dropped close to 2K on gear, guns etc since the start of the season..(yes, he has a wonderful wife that continues to support his obsessions surrounding his hunting) The other friend was a single guy and he of course had no better half to ponder this over..and pretty sure after boring my gear for the first hunt would have not had a say anyway..lol He did the same and everything from the Benelli to shells...bought the best and most expensive gear to last. I almost felt obligated at this point to take him on every outing after that..just to ensure he got his money worth..lol

    This was a full weekend hunt and if anyone read my story earlier on the wind..this was the weekend it happened..crazy wind 60mph plus and blew all the water out of DL. All three of us limited out on birds for two days..I think it was Nina's third to last hunt and one of the best when it came to hunting with new waterfowlers and the dog...I will add..it was very difficult for me trying to explain everything that surrounds waterfowling from decoys, calls, why the dog does this and that..too why we are set up the way we are with wind etc..to identifying birds for them to shoot. Even had to call one of them off of that SWAN that he swore up and down was a snow goose....

    Will add one later on when I was guiding in Kansas..(Waterfowlers Paradise) outside of Nebraska or Canada

    Looking forward to making more..every time I go.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Picture of those two days
    Alaska Duck Hunt.jpg
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
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    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  9. #9

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    Mine is a hunt that was done over ice as well... This was probably back in 2004 or 2005 in late october or early november. I woke up WAY too early for the mornings hunt, which later winds up being a good thing. I had an old beat up 2wd ford ranger and an inflatable boat with a 5hp mercury outboard. On my way to jim creek, a trooper pulled me over because part of my inflatable inside of my mini pickup bed was covering a tail light. Moved along from that and eventually made it out to the creek... launched the boat, inflated it, put the decoys inside of it, loaded up the shotgun, looked for my shells... wait a minute, where are my shells?! I left my shells at home. STUPID. Okay, so 45 min drive home, 45 min drive back out... same thing, I inflated the boat, strapped on the motor, loaded all my gear, shotgun and SHELLS. It was still plenty dark out side (maybe 0700 hours, shooting light was around 0800 if I estimate correctly). I made it up to the leaf/swan lake area where both lakes start flowing into the creek. The lakes were frozen solid and the only thing open was some open water at the mouths of the lakes. I heard one guy breaking ice on the leaf lake side so I decided to set up on the swan lake side. I didn't break much ice and set up at the end of the flowing water where the ice started. I set some decoys on the far edge of the channel and set about a dozen additional decoys on the ice. I pulled the boat out of the water and dragged it about 100 yards away and covered it with a dirty white sheet (I forgot to mention it snowed about 3 inches the night prior). I'm set up and hiding under a white sheet right off the edge of the ice with less than 5 minutes to go before shooting time.. the birds out numbered my decoys while I was dragging the inflatable off into the brush. As soon as shooting light came, a large flock of big ol jumbo mallards flys over and circles about half a dozen times.. when they finally commit, I opened up on them at about 15 yards with a cylinder choke and a 3" load of #2 steel. 3 big greenheads down. All the birds sitting in the decoys flushed, consisting of mostly goldeneyes. I waited a few minutes to see how many mallards were flying and didnt see any other groups in the immediate area, so I started hammering the goldeneyes. I chose to only shoot the goldeneyes that presented the most challenging shots, low, fast, crossing shots where the birds werent really committed to the decoys. I wasn't nearly as experienced of a shotgunner then as I am now so a LOT of steel shot is flying through the air. I'm literally shooting as fast as I can reload. It wasn't long before 5 goldeneyes lay dead on the ice and water nearby me. Anything that hit the ice was the coolest thing as far as a downed bird goes... made a nice commanding THUD! I picked up my birds, decoys and got my boat ready for the trip out... only one problem, I had all day to be out there and it isn't even 0900 yet. So whats a guy to do.... Go rabbit hunting of course!! So I motored down stream a ways to some spots where I have shot some rabbits before. I haven't shot a rabbit with a duck load yet at this point but was curious as to see what it would do. No sooner than I pop into the bushes, I see a rabbit... luck huh? Well each spot I went to for the next 3 spots was the same way. So 4 rabbits down, and in the process of looking for the rabbits I came across 2 ruffed grouse. So, I've got a limit of ducks, a limit of ruffed grouse, and 4 rabbits down. I decided to let the last rabbit go (even though I saw a 5th one) because I was going to be up all afternoon cleaning animals. I had about 5 shells leftover out of 3 boxes!!! Ever since then, I always strive to top that morning. I dont think I ever will, not even after putting 4 of us on a limit of birds on the hayflats this year. It's going to take something pretty ridiculous to top that morning. By the way, it was also my first limit of ducks I ever shot as well. Wish I had a buddy I could have convinced to come along with me that morning.. all I had was a pile of critters to show them when I got back!

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Well you got a buddy that you can convince now!
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

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    Only the serious waterfowlers will endure what the ice throws at cha.. I dont care. I have seen so many fold or find it to hard to leave that bed at 3am to get out there and chase em...not sure, something about it..

    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    Well you got a buddy that you can convince now!
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    One of my most memorable hunts was in the ice as well. It was the first and only time I have shot a goose up here in AK. I will go until there is nothing flying but ravens!
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  13. #13

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    Great story! Reminds me of hunting whit my dad and my two brothers except that we never got that many birds, but did manage to learn how to freeze our butts off and love it!

  14. #14

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    My greatest hunt was a Moose hunt last year, probably not the right forum for that, but if you want to hear it I will post it.
    Jesse

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    Last year, on what proved to be the most extreme weather I hunted in that season, we kept seeing large groups settle into some flooded timber about 400 yds off. The birds were not interested in our decoys and it was apparent that they wanted that very spot. We fought our way over closer to where the birds were, jumped out about 75 fatty, full colored mallards, and snugged up next to the trees and waited for them to return... They came back and we both had fat straps in minutes. The curious thing was that the birds didn't seem to mind their buddies being shot and they would circle and try to light in the same exact spot. Another curious thing was that it wasn't a pond they were trying to land on but rather a bare spot of muck which had been worn by the birds using it. The best I could figure was ther there was some choice food there or some sort of mineral or something that was attracting them to that 6 x 10 spot in the marsh... You can bet I'll be keeping a close eye on that honey hole...

    dodger
    “The perils of duck hunting are great - especially for the duck.” Walter Cronkite

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    Ok so my story started in 1995 when I was still spending part of the winters in the east coast. My dad was working for a guy who owned a farm and they had many a goose issue, so they left it up to the workers who hunted to thin out the geese.. Having the privilege of hunting the Dupont estate on the eastern shore I met an old chesapeake who was one of the toughest looking retrievers i ever seen...needless to say I was hooked on the breed. So when I started hunting this farm it was only natural to get a chessie.... That winter I got "Bear". I was very fortunite with time and being able to utilize the farm I trained Bear myself for the next 9 or so months,reading every book,keeping it simple,mock hunts the whole nine yards.. So now he ready(or so I thought).. excitement was building.. Opening day approached I got in early with Bear who really was still just a pup so I just wanted him to have a good day. The only thing I didnt want was to just wing a 12 pound goose and have it beat the heck out of my pup and shy him away from hunting... Well guess what the first flight flew over the very first shot I winged a goose...thought no big deal Bear wont break...yeah right..Bear took off across the stream grabbed that goose and got his but kicked by that bird but he finally managed to get a good mouth on the bird but the problem was the gooses wing was covering Bears face and eyes,but he wouldnt drop it.. I had to keep calling him in as he ran into the fence,creek and every thing else... It was the funniest thing I ever seen and I will never forget that moment when a goose dog was born... Bear went on to retrieve a bunch of geese that season and many more through out his 14 years...I miss that dog ..what a good hunting partner and family he was..

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    good one Bear, reminds me when Nina grabbed a goose by side and the wing ws covering her eyes..she kept swimming in circles about 75 yards out and no mater ho many times I told her to drop..she wouldn't let go. finally had to go get her with the boat..some great times for sure are spent with them. I just don't understand how waterfowlers can hunt without one. they complete the hunt in so many ways

    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Ok so my story started in 1995 when I was still spending part of the winters in the east coast. My dad was working for a guy who owned a farm and they had many a goose issue, so they left it up to the workers who hunted to thin out the geese.. Having the privilege of hunting the Dupont estate on the eastern shore I met an old chesapeake who was one of the toughest looking retrievers i ever seen...needless to say I was hooked on the breed. So when I started hunting this farm it was only natural to get a chessie.... That winter I got "Bear". I was very fortunite with time and being able to utilize the farm I trained Bear myself for the next 9 or so months,reading every book,keeping it simple,mock hunts the whole nine yards.. So now he ready(or so I thought).. excitement was building.. Opening day approached I got in early with Bear who really was still just a pup so I just wanted him to have a good day. The only thing I didnt want was to just wing a 12 pound goose and have it beat the heck out of my pup and shy him away from hunting... Well guess what the first flight flew over the very first shot I winged a goose...thought no big deal Bear wont break...yeah right..Bear took off across the stream grabbed that goose and got his but kicked by that bird but he finally managed to get a good mouth on the bird but the problem was the gooses wing was covering Bears face and eyes,but he wouldnt drop it.. I had to keep calling him in as he ran into the fence,creek and every thing else... It was the funniest thing I ever seen and I will never forget that moment when a goose dog was born... Bear went on to retrieve a bunch of geese that season and many more through out his 14 years...I miss that dog ..what a good hunting partner and family he was..
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    My most memorable of many hunts was 9 years ago in Northern California with my 1 year old Labrador on her first real duck hunt after attending duck dog bootcamp. We had kayaked into a small pond surrounded by thick riparian habitat and then 1000's of acres of rice. The place was wood duck heaven. Minutes before shoot time we had woddies swimming through the decoys while I was softly quacking to a few mallards overhead. I had one hand on the call and the other petting my dog trying to calm her nerves. She could barely contain her enthusiasm (nor could I). Shoot time finally arrived and chaos erupted. She was treated to a mixed bag of woodies and mallards on her first day in the duck marsh.

    This week has about killed me. My hunting buddy of the past 9 seasons is sidelined with an injured tendon and my younger dog has been getting all of the work in the marsh. The look on her face just about brings tears to my eyes as I force her to stay in the house as the other dog and I leave in the morning.

  19. #19
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    My lab is almost 12. My last hunt with him is most memorable, until the next one, because I never know which will truly be his last one.
    His first one was pretty good too.
    Today was the day for my most memorable hunt.
    Last trip for my old friend as he is officially retiring to the couch after 12 seasons.

    2 birds is enough. Its been a long time since I've hunted for "me".
    ... and a photo from when they were both young.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

  20. #20
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Milo,

    looks like that belongs in a 8x10 frame on the wall...nice pictures.


    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    Today was the day for my most memorable hunt.
    Last trip for my old friend as he is officially retiring to the couch after 12 seasons.

    2 birds is enough. Its been a long time since I've hunted for "me".
    ... and a photo from when they were both young.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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