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Thread: Blued Rifles For AK....

  1. #1
    Member NDTerminator's Avatar
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    Default Blued Rifles For AK....

    Purely curious, being as I have a safe full of blued rifles but only four stainless steel (left handers Rem 700s in 270 and 7MM RUM, a LH Browning A Bolt 338 Mag, and a S&W Mountain Gun 44Mag).

    Do blued rifles hold up to regular use in Alaska?...

  2. #2
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    IMO, yes, as long as you take care of them. I know of a lot of blued rifle stored in outside caches in the villages that look like hell, but still function.
    The only areas where you may run into problems, is in the coastal areas where it rains and blows alot. And only if you don't take time to perform a little maintenance.
    Inland where it's drier, you won't have anymore issues than anywhere else.
    Now what ?

  3. #3
    Member smwwoody's Avatar
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    I live in SE Alaska on the coast. I don't think there could be a worse place to have a blued rifle. I use a blued model 70 winchester. It is in great shape. It is well waxed for extended outings and on day hunts it is protected with Break Free CLP.

    Woody

  4. #4
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default Wax on, wax off?

    I'd like to 2nd woodies assessment. Plenty of wax really helps in SE.

    kingfisherktn

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default Never again.

    No dis to any other opinions, but a blued gun in Alaska is just too much work and upkeep. Its wasted money imho.
    Same gun in desert Nevada, Arizona etc? Hey no problem.
    I know, I know, I can hear the dissenters already, hey its just one opinion.
    But Alaska is just too wet and extreme.
    I only use stainless/synthetic now and clean/oil after my trips--not all during them.

    I'm pretty picky about stink on my guns too. Less is always more with odor.

    Frank

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    Those firearms I most frequently carry in the woods, that were previously blued, have had a baked enamel finish applied by a gun smith. Other than for polishing the bolt, to return the action to original characteristics, it has worked well..

    Or, you could sell blued guns and buy stnls.

    I've had persons speak to dangers of rust or weakness to metal forming beneath the enamel, out of sight, but I've not experienced that.

    I still use Rem-oil on them, despite the baked enamel finish.

    The absence of blemishes and major maintenance from rain has been a major plus in my opinion.

    ruffle
    Last edited by ruffle; 04-21-2007 at 13:50.

  7. #7
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default Wax

    Fullkurl:

    I don't disagree with your opinion at all, in fact I agree with it. I haven't purchased a blued gun for over 20 years, maybe purchased 15-20 ss ones in that time frame and that's what I use 99.9% of the time.

    But, if I take a blued one into the field in SE it always has a coat of paste wax on it.

    kingfishektn

  8. #8
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    I do have a couple of blued guns too, Kingfish.
    What is the brand of wax you use? I'll get some. Does it have any odor?

  9. #9
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default johnson paste

    wax has been my favorite, slight odor when applying but not noticeable in the field.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    No dis to any other opinions, but a blued gun in Alaska is just too much work and upkeep. Its wasted money imho.
    Same gun in desert Nevada, Arizona etc? Hey no problem.
    I know, I know, I can hear the dissenters already, hey its just one opinion.
    But Alaska is just too wet and extreme.
    I only use stainless/synthetic now and clean/oil after my trips--not all during them......
    I agree 100%.

    If it's available, stainless is just less hassle. It's worth the upfront cost.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    Those firearms I most frequently carry in the woods, that were previously blued, have had a baked enamel finish applied by a gun smith. Other than for polishing the bolt, to return the action to original characteristics, it has worked well....
    With the firearms "I just had to have" which weren't available in stainless, that is what I did. I used Robar finishes.

    In my experience, these finishes work just as well as stainless.

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    >>>In my experience, these finishes work just as well as stainless.<<<

    It's my understanding that they amount, in essence, to a finer grade 'powder coating.'

    Have you heard -anything- about the alleged 'invisible rust' issues. I haven't witnessed it, as I said earlier, though some folks have been very confident stating that it occurs on motorcycle frames, and other metal frames, etc., with powder coating.

    But we're talking different grades/hardness of steel, and perhaps even potentially slightly different processes.

    I use my 'baked' finish .338 WM every moose season, as well as at the range, and it functions fine. I had some resistance to the bolt when it was first done, but other than that, and after polishing the bolt, no further issues.

    At the same time, I'd hate like anything to find out with a magnum load in there that there was hidden rust working away at it for 'x' years.

    (I've considered putting such a finish on my old S&W 29-2, just because it's such a slick action and gun, down-right silky, providing that the loads aren't too stout. But the action on that seems to have minimal room for too much finish, and I've worried that I'd have resistance in the paw and rotation of the cylinder. Even hot loads, in relatively rapid succession, used to stiffen it up in terms of smooth rotation 'til I learned to modify its diet.)

    ruffle

  13. #13
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I do have a few stainless guns. Plus a few with parkerized tyope finishes.

    The prettest blued firearm I have are a 7 x 57 Mauser with a douglas #5. It was triple blued back around 1974 by a master gunsmith named Foster Williams. I take care of it and it takes care of me. FOR 33 YEARS.
    Plus it is still the most accurate rifle I have ever shot.
    That rifle has been in a swamped skiff (salt water) during bear season, been rained on for days and had snow collect on the barrel.
    Here in Kachemak Bay, Kamashak Bay, Fort Yukon, Peterburg Ak, Washington State and even a few years on the east coast while I was doing my first active duty tour with the Navy.

    He also reblued a M-29 about a year later. It still looks like new.

    My CZ rifles have a nice blue job, but I have noticed blueing salts leaching from the barrel threads.

    Gee, I wonder why my 1892 Winchester (1st year production) looks pretty good after more than 114 years?
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    >>>In my experience, these finishes work just as well as stainless.<<<

    It's my understanding that they amount, in essence, to a finer grade 'powder coating.'

    Have you heard -anything- about the alleged 'invisible rust' issues.
    No, I haven't.

    It appears that with pretty basic maintenance, the coatings I've used hold up very well.

    I haven't witnessed it, as I said earlier, though some folks have been very confident stating that it occurs on motorcycle frames, and other metal frames, etc., with powder coating.
    Finishes subjected to the road get whupped pretty well. Even an abused rifle gets a good break in the safe for a while.

    (I've considered putting such a finish on my old S&W 29-2, just because it's such a slick action and gun, down-right silky, providing that the loads aren't too stout. But the action on that seems to have minimal room for too much finish, and I've worried that I'd have resistance in the paw and rotation of the cylinder. Even hot loads, in relatively rapid succession, used to stiffen it up in terms of smooth rotation 'til I learned to modify its diet.)
    I've felt the same with my handguns. I haven't used such finishes on them. I'm pretty much stainless in the sidearm department.

    But I've wanted to "blacken" a couple. I haven't done it yet, and I'm concerned about clearances and smoothness......

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    I think it should be pointed out that so-called stainless firearms will rust too, although they are more resistant to it.

    There are ways to keep a blued rifle from rusting, and a wood stock from warping, but no rifle comes through without some honorable scars, even the stainless/synthetic ones.
    Smitty of the North

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    I agree with the stainless is great line of thought. I have stainless rifles too. If I am buying new and I can get it in stainless that is the way I go, but if I all ready have it and it is blued it is still going hunting. I enjoy keeping a good relationship with my firearms. sometimes my wife thinks I like to spend more time with them than her.... so I don't mind the extra work to keep them up I call it fun. the blued ones work well you just have to keep up with them

    Woody

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    Member akndres's Avatar
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    I agree that the stainless gun is the way to go for hunting in Alaska...but it isn't a necessity, by far.

    On my extended/overnight trips with a blued rifle...all I take is a Hoppes Silicon Rag and a small 1oz (?) bottle of gun oil. This is the same maintenance kit I take with my stainless guns as well. It stays in a ziplock type bag. At night when I'm in the tent and the stories are being told... I just give it a quick wipe down and hit the action with a drop or two of oil, if need be. This has been all that was necessary on my interior/NS hunts. However, more maintenance would definitely be in order in a saltwater/air environment.

    What did the ol'timers do before stainless barrels....
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by smwwoody View Post
    ....I enjoy keeping a good relationship with my firearms. sometimes my wife thinks I like to spend more time with them than her....
    Blued firearms require almost as much love and attention as a wife.

    Stainless firearms allow one to devote more attention to the wife.

  19. #19
    Member NDTerminator's Avatar
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    Talking

    Appreciate all the opinions. The job I'm looking it is out of Fairbanks, and from what I have researched the weather is not a lot different than in ND, believe it or not.

    Blued stuff works fine here, but requires plenty of attention. Was told about some stuff called CorrosionX by an east coat duck hunter a couple years ago, and it's practically miraculous in preventing rust. Never seen anything like it...

    That being said, it's pretty clear that hunting the coastal regions present it's own unique conditions/obstacles. I rather suspected as much, and I don't intend to confine my hunting to the backyard.

    Looks like I may have to invest in a couple lefty Browning Stainless Stalkers. My LH SS Remington 700 in 7MM RUM is just begging to be re-barreled to 375 H&H..

    Geez, I just hate buying new rifles....

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