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Thread: Basic rules and knowledge for dip netting

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    Member Kevin0718's Avatar
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    Default Basic rules and knowledge for dip netting

    Been living in Alaska for two years now and have not been dip netting. I hear i am really missing out. What are the basic rules and knowledge one needs to know to dip net next year. Thanks for the help

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin0718 View Post
    Been living in Alaska for two years now and have not been dip netting. I hear i am really missing out. What are the basic rules and knowledge one needs to know to dip net next year. Thanks for the help
    .

    Kevin the rules are pretty well spelled out in the Fishing Regs. The Knowledge can probably best be acquired by going with some one who has done it before.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin0718 View Post
    Been living in Alaska for two years now and have not been dip netting. I hear i am really missing out. What are the basic rules and knowledge one needs to know to dip net next year. Thanks for the help
    Rule #1: Water is always way more powerful and stubborn than it lets on; respect it, no matter where you are.

    Rule #2: Fish have a significantly greater weight-to-strength/strength-to-weight ratio than they often receive credit for. Be properly braced for lifting them from the water, making sure to consider Rule #1.

    Rule #3: Anything at the end of a 12'-20' pole has the advantage of 'leverage' as applied or discussed in most physics courses. Even a relatively small fish at the end of a pole of such length can SEEM fairly heavy, especially at the end of a long (12 hrs? 24 hrs?) dipping excursion. Keep your carb intake in order to stay strong, and keep hydrated too.

    Rule #4: While high-water mark, down to the water level itself, denotes publicly accessible land, the land between the trail and the high-water mark may not be open to the public. Respect private property, whether you agree with how it was acquired or not.

    Rule #5: While most of the land previously described between the water and high-water mark is open to public access, it's both polite, as well as an unwritten rule, to not encroach on others' space(s) when accessing the water. Combat fishing increases risks of ALL sorts.

    Rule #6: Try to maintain yourself, your camp, and your catch in such a manner as to 'survive' any impromptu visits from the Authorities (whom ever they may be). Murphy may be living with you without your knowledge, and money is harder to come by these days; no sense in giving it away, no matter what the fine is for.. And it could, in some cases, cost you the forfeiture of your fishing license in years to come.

    Rule #7: Maintain enough pressure on your net's handle to discern the sometimes-subtle impact of fish 'bumping it,' and practice your own preferred method for quickly and safely closing the pocket of the net.. They're feisty little fellers, and at the end of the day, likely much faster than we are..

    Rule #8: No matter how expensive fish becomes at the grocery store's meat counter, no salmon is worth dying for (*See rule #1, again...)

    Rule #9: While partying after the catch is fun, excess drinking or use of specific classes of drugs while actively dip-netting often leads to being wet, cold, or worse.. Again, see rule #1.

    Rule #10: Respect the fact that this is one of the few and rare places you can legally gather your winter's fish in this manner. Respecting the regulations and taking care of your catch will help to insure that we can do this for years to come.

    Rule #11: Carry adequate gear, to sometimes include harnesses, ropes for you and your net, as well as your fish, and any circumstances you think you may encounter.

    Rule #12: Don't turn a great dipping spot into a mini-landfill; clean up after yourself, both for your own reputation/karma, and for the enjoyment of those who will come to that spot after you...

    Rule #13: Try to have fun. You're likely to use muscles you haven't used adequately in years, if ever.

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    Thanks for the rules seem easy enough to live by when dip netting. I guess I did not ask the question in the right manner. I will read the reg book. Im just wounding where a good place to go, what kinda special permits do i need I will not be back to alaska till the end of october 2012 so im just trying to get ready this winter no a week before it starts I know i can get one of those huge nets at Costco. i have chest waiters and boots. Im just looking where to go the best time to go and some good pointers when getting there and when im in the water thanks for the help its really apprciated i did not see old threads that really help me.

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    I can pitch in maybe! I like the Costco nets, but the welder in Sterling near Kenai makes spectacular nets. I have found regardless of the type of frame I have that the newer the actual gillnet is the better. You need your get your regular papers, and you pick up the dipnet permit at Fred Myers or lots of other places.

    Timing is dependent on what river/area you want to dipnet. The copper river (chitna) is early, june through July. I am not familiar with that one as it's a longer drive, and is just harder to do from what I've heard and seen. It is also somewhat dangerous. The fish though are very large, and might be the best tasting.

    Kenai/Kasilof is later, think July, and you access both at the mouths of the rivers, and there are easy ways to find out the directions. Kenai is a circus with people everwhere, and imo it's pretty fun. The fish are bigger there too. I think it's to many people though, it's muddy, and people walk the banks. I like Kasilof as it's slighty less of a zoo, the south side has some sandy spots, people don't generally walk the banks. You just stand there with your net in the water. So out of all of em it's the easiest. However the fish are a lot smaller.

    Incoming tide is best imo, however I think time in the water is the best thing. Certain tides are better at certain times at various spots in the river, but in general you won't catch fish w/o your net in the water. I only don't dipnet when the water is rippping out, my net is going straight out and no fish is getting stuck in it anyway, and it's just to hard to hold the dipnet. However most people fish certain portions of the tides. I would say the night high tides are better as there is slightly less people, but the ones who are there might be drunker too. Not everyone is drunk/partying/driving four wheelers all over the place though. I would warn anyone who's never done it on the pennisula though, that you'll likely run into it. Almost everyone is awesome, keeps it clean, and picks up after themselves in my experience so it's still always fun. There are just sometimes folks a little out of control. (or so little/young they can't control an atv so out of control in a different way) Anyway keep asking questions. What else you curious about?

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    Default Basic rules and knowledge for dip netting

    Buy good nets the first go around. Not cheap ones they sell at Costco. Get the ones out of Serling. Second. Watch from the beach for a bit then jump in there and have fun.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

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    Akbrownsfan, thank you very much that was extremly helpful. When I do go I probably will go to the Kenai. I fly fish there and two summers ago i had no clue what dip netting was but i sure saw everyone driving south with huge nets tied to there cars it was funny a huge convoy of little compact cars with nets on the roofs. About how much further is the Kasilof from Kenai. Like i said i will probably go to the Kenai but might try the Kasilof. Like someone else said i might just stand back and watch others do it then try it. How is the parking? do you recommand a one day trip or a weekend trip. i know you need a big cooler for the fish. the net and chest waiters any other useful gear. Thanks again for the post you have cleared alot of my questions already just dont wanna go there be un prepared, but im sure i will learn as i go just want to be ready for it

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    hey Kevin! sorry to take so long to get back to you. I always get a kick out of the caravan of nets going south/north on the hwy too each year. The Kasilof is about an hour past the Kenai. Both rivers have a more devolped main beach on one side (parking/camping/outhouses), and another side that is more 4X4 type areas. Still have parking/camping outhouse, but should really have 4x4 to drive out on the beach. On the kenai I believe parking was $50 a night last summer. (Anyone? Is that right?) and it pays for the outhouses, trash pickup, general stuff. The Kasilof is free on the south beach (and that is where I go always). It has some outhouses, and thanks to the dipnet association and others has a great fence to protect dunes and other improvements. There is usually lots of parking at both rivers on both banks, but they both fill up really fast when word gets out that the fish are in.
    I usually want to dipnet an entire weekend if I can. I follow the numbers on the internet as far as how many fish are coming in-river, and when it gets to look good (10,000 per day min at kasilof and 30,000 a day on the Kenai if I dip there at all). I try to get there. I like the whole weekend as the drive down costs money. I want to get fish when I go, so making sure I get more tide cycles is important. I have driven down for the day though many times as well. I also like staying the whole weekend as I get a kick out of the whole experience. It is what it is, and I like it. Kind of like an Alaskan burning man festival.......but with salmon.

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    Ok great thanks for the reply no worries on it taking so long i have plenty of time till the dipnetting starts back up next season i really appreciate the tips it will help out alot for next year when I do dipnetting for the first time

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    I've thought about tips on gear and came up with one essential thing............a table and/or a really good cutting board. I recently used a construction type table/sawhorse that had a board fixed to the middle of it at waist ht, and a nail in the board near the front if it to jam the fishes head on. I liked it as it all folded up, and was pretty cheap. I used to use my truck tailgate, cooler lids, and cutting boards on the ground..........but man o man the table makes life easy. I take it down to the water line and take care of my fish after every tide. That way I take better care of my fish, and it doesn't make the end of the day a humungous pain.

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    here is a great link if you haven't already found it.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...naiSalmon.regs

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    had a dipnet red salmon last nite. all the work and planning is worth it. that is the best fish on the grill.

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    I really like that cutting board idea that you came up with very cheap and smart (high five). Thank you for the website I will be looking into that

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    Timing is crucial. Check out the links below for planning the timing of your trip.

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    For the first time I noticed a statement in the fish subsistence regulations that says, no non-resident can possess any subsistence caught salmon.
    Is this new? I am aware of the participating restrictions for non-residents.

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    Another thing to keep in mind is when people are doing the Kenai shuffle, which is they walk down the beach with their nets in the water; Go with the flow. Don't stand still and make people go around you. There are idiots out there every year that do it. South side of the Kenai, you will need a wheeler or 4 wheel drive. The north side is drop off only at the beach so a car would work there.
    It doesn't take long till you get the hang of it. Bring plenty of ice too
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by otternorth View Post
    For the first time I noticed a statement in the fish subsistence regulations that says, no non-resident can possess any subsistence caught salmon.
    Is this new? I am aware of the participating restrictions for non-residents.
    Since Dipnetting is considered "Personal Use" and not "Subsistence" I don't see why this is in the dipnetting forum.
    There is a big difference between the two though many people get them mixed up.
    As far as subsistence goes I can see this regulation being important. Subsistence is supposed to be for peoples subsistence not to feed all their friends and relatives from outside Alaska. I actually preffered the way dipnetting was written before they changed it. I don't see where non-residents need to be able to recieve dipnet caught fish.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    I would add a rule that we remind ourselves every year for the past decade or more and that's don't let your eye get bigger than your freezer. Also when its hot fishing, our rule is every hour on the water is at least 2 hours of work after the water in terms of cleaning everything. Don't dipnet your whole allocated "free time" to netting the fish, that's just the beginning...for proper care.

    When you are slamming fish, its very hard to stop. Not only do you not want to go over your limit, but you definitely do not want to be throwing out good fish "that have been in the freezer too long" next year. I think out of the 35 or so I kept last year, I have two left in the freezer. C'mon Salmon season!!!!

    #1 rule: Be safe!
    #2 rule: Be respectful
    #3 rule: Have fun!

    lol. like anyone needs to be told that...

    Edit:

    I'll add its much easier from a boat!

    2012 dipnetting


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    2011 dipnetting


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    Quote Originally Posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
    I would add a rule that we remind ourselves every year for the past decade or more and that's don't let your eye get bigger than your freezer. Also when its hot fishing, our rule is every hour on the water is at least 2 hours of work after the water in terms of cleaning everything. Don't dipnet your whole allocated "free time" to netting the fish, that's just the beginning...for proper care.

    When you are slamming fish, its very hard to stop. Not only do you not want to go over your limit, but you definitely do not want to be throwing out good fish "that have been in the freezer too long" next year. I think out of the 35 or so I kept last year, I have two left in the freezer. C'mon Salmon season!!!!

    #1 rule: Be safe!
    #2 rule: Be respectful
    #3 rule: Have fun!

    lol. like anyone needs to be told that...

    Edit:

    I'll add its much easier from a boat!
    Very good advice thanks for posting that. It is very easy to get greedy and harvest more than you can use.
    We always set a limit before we get out in the boat and we always stick to it. Our limit is not what we can catch but what we can and/or will use.
    I will only dip from a boat anymore. The crowds and hassle of the beach is not for me.
    We always take the fish home and clean them there. No sense putting all that fish waste directly onto the crowded beach.
    It is disgusting enough already during dipnet season.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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