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Thread: Oh No! We have to MANAGE our wildlife!

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default Oh No! We have to MANAGE our wildlife!

    http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012...?lite=obinsite Oh, my, how the greenies must be squirming as they manage this outbreak!

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Oh No! We have to MANAGE our wildlife!

    The real problem is with the habituated mice....

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    When authorities first identified the Yosemite hantavirus outbreak, rangers balked at the idea of trying to exterminate the deer mice, arguing that the mice play an important role in the Yosemite ecosystem. But when they realized the deer mice population had swelled, they decided to thin it in an effort to rebalance the ecosystem, Buttke said.


    They weren't so concerned with the hantavirus outbreak, which features a >30% fatality rate among humans. They were concerned about balance in the ecosystem of an overcrowded park.

    It appears that what needs management isn't so much wildlife as environmental extremism.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    When they reintroduced the wolves, the wolves displaced the coyotes which eat lots and lots of mice.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    When they reintroduced the wolves, the wolves displaced the coyotes which eat lots and lots of mice.
    I must have missed where they reintroduced the wolves into Yosemite.
    http://www.yosemitepark.com/yosemite-wildlife.aspx

    In the movie "Never Cry Wolf", the wolves seemed to eat plenty of mice.

    Anyone with a South Park episode reference that might shed a better understanding of how this ecosystem stuff works?

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wet eNuf View Post
    I must have missed where they reintroduced the wolves into Yosemite.
    http://www.yosemitepark.com/yosemite-wildlife.aspx

    In the movie "Never Cry Wolf", the wolves seemed to eat plenty of mice.

    Anyone with a South Park episode reference that might shed a better understanding of how this ecosystem stuff works?
    Apples and oranges, habitat-wise. Never Cry Wolf was set in the Canadian arctic where big game is only seasonally abundant. Yellowstone has large, healthy herds of elk, mule deer, and bison.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    The diet ecology of canis lupis has been pretty well studied in north america and several other countries. While dietary variations occurr seasonally, and large ungulate or other large mammal species targeted varies by location, one constant is generally applicable everywhere; a significant percentage of a wolves diet is comprised of rodents.

    Studies specific to the Yellowstone ecosystem since wolf reintroduction indicate that due to ecosystem imballance, wolves in that area initially targeted a higher percentage of large ungulates (primarily Elk) in their diet than they normally would in a more ballanced system. Study authors are expecting to see a shift to a lower percentage of ungulate, and an increase in rodents, etc. in the diets of Yellowstone system wolves as time goes by and the system returns toward a more natural ballance.

    Wet eNuf's point is valid; as far as we know there are no wolves in Yosemite. No coyotes have been displaced there.
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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    My apologies--I didn't read closely enough and mentally substituted Yellowstone for Yosemite, though I imagine this mouse population explosion is somehow related to a lack of terrestrial predators. I don't know how well foxes and coyotes do in that part of California, but generally creatures like mice only boom when there aren't enough mouse eaters to keep them in check.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    My apologies--I didn't read closely enough and mentally substituted Yellowstone for Yosemite, though I imagine this mouse population explosion is somehow related to a lack of terrestrial predators. I don't know how well foxes and coyotes do in that part of California, but generally creatures like mice only boom when there aren't enough mouse eaters to keep them in check.
    Not to mention human activity which provides them with an unnatural abundance of nesting opportunity protected from predators, and in doing so concentrates them, and their associated waste which carries the virus, in close proximity to humans. Elimination of tourist tent-cabin villages and reintroduction of wolves would solve the problem.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I suspect that the 4 million visitors dropping peanut butter cracker and jelly sammich crumbs has the most to do with it... Rodent population explodes when large quantities of people are added to the mix. Without massive sanitation systems in place to support a large population then disease is going to become prevalent. It is strange how people will go out into the wilderness and trash it when they would not do the same in their own home. Most people regularly sweep their floor and put trash into a trash can then take it out to be picked up by the trash man, yet these same people seem less inclined to do those sorts of things in the forest. In a wilderness environment even those who won't leave paper/plastic trash laying around are still probably not going to pick up the sandwich or smore they dropped on the ground.

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    Yep! Them dang crumbs are a problem for that many mice that have no nachral fear of man 'cause they're be in fed by a bunch of chin dribblers eattin crackers n' peanut butter. Ware's Farley Mow-hat when we needs him to study them mice? I bet he'd put some fear back in sum 'o them my-crotis 'n such. He'd do a duck duck goose study for up to 6-months 'an have it ALL figured out. Yep! If we shipped in some pilot bread them Kie-Oats'd be able to eattem better. Or not.... Hear kitty, kitty, kitty...

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    I think the greenies should line up to volunteer to diaper the little mice.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Where is the outcry for sterilization programs? Or capture and relocate? After all, we cannot have a government bent on total eradication of a species simply because it is interfering with humans. After all, it is the humans who are intruding upon the mouse's habitat!

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