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Thread: Sometimes 1 boat is not enough

  1. #1
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Default Sometimes 1 boat is not enough

    Nothing like having options when moose hunting.
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I agree with that.



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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Sometimes 1 boat is not enough

    Yukoner, I was just contemplating that type of set up. A couple years ago I picked up a 1971 9.8hp merc for $75 and just started tearing into it this week. I have never works on an outboard so figure this on will be the best bet to learn. Once I get her running then I figure she will serve nicely as a kicker and canoe motor. I suspect that the 9.8 would push a canoe all day long on what my Wooly uses in an hour.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Nice combo! Now you need a roof rack to store it when running your Wooly.

  5. #5

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    You're right! You got me thinking about how many boats i have access to if i include a couple of close friends....looks like 14...and still wanting. What an illness!


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    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Yet another project, I need to build a roof rack! Having the canoe insoed worked pretty well, except I had to take out all the seats (save mine!) and let my buddy sit on a cooler Herc strapped it to the rails, and it was solid. Used it to line up a small river into what we hoped would be Moose Valhalla. I'm sure it would have been but we were shut down by a serious rapid with vertical side walls, no way around it.
    Stid, you have THE set up man. The old AKII looks loaded down eh?
    Do any of you gents who have roof racks find it affects your fuel consumption?
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    Yet another project, I need to build a roof rack! Having the canoe insoed worked pretty well, except I had to take out all the seats (save mine!) and let my buddy sit on a cooler Herc strapped it to the rails, and it was solid. Used it to line up a small river into what we hoped would be Moose Valhalla. I'm sure it would have been but we were shut down by a serious rapid with vertical side walls, no way around it.
    Stid, you have THE set up man. The old AKII looks loaded down eh?
    Do any of you gents who have roof racks find it affects your fuel consumption?
    Yukoner,, We were loaded heavy. We did the Bridge to Koyukuk trip 1023 miles burnt 234.4 gallons of fuel.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Yukoner,, We were loaded heavy. We did the Bridge to Koyukuk trip 1023 miles burnt 234.4 gallons of fuel.

    WOW, was that with the prop? How heavy are you calling heavy, any WAG's on weight?
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    WOW, was that with the prop? How heavy are you calling heavy, any WAG's on weight?
    With the extra boat, camp and 120 gallons of gas we were around 2500lbs and I was running a 17 pitch 3 bladed prop. I still had power to step more and had a 15 pitch 4 blade if I got real heavy.
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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    With the extra boat, camp and 120 gallons of gas we were around 2500lbs and I was running a 17 pitch 3 bladed prop. I still had power to step more and had a 15 pitch 4 blade if I got real heavy.
    Seems lika lot of fuel for a prop, you must have had the "hammer down" to keep on step?
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  11. #11
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Seems lika lot of fuel for a prop, you must have had the "hammer down" to keep on step?

    We ran @4300 rpm and averaged 33 mph down river and 28 mph or so up river. Got 4 to 5 mpg burning 6 to 7 gph, so I was quite happy. The Extreme Shallow we took 2 years ago burnt 600 gallons plus 11 gallons of oil, so 234 gallons was cheap to me after that trip.
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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    We ran @4300 rpm and averaged 33 mph down river and 28 mph or so up river. Got 4 to 5 mpg burning 6 to 7 gph, so I was quite happy. The Extreme Shallow we took 2 years ago burnt 600 gallons plus 11 gallons of oil, so 234 gallons was cheap to me after that trip.
    Oh, thats much better than what I thought I saw on the screen shot......or at least how it appeared, It looked like 2.19 nautical miles per gallon? 4-5MPG is excellent........
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
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  13. #13
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Oh, thats much better than what I thought I saw on the screen shot......or at least how it appeared, It looked like 2.19 nautical miles per gallon? 4-5MPG is excellent........
    Those numbers were when I had came off step right at the boat ramp as they change as fuel flow changes. I was just wanting to get a photo of the total fuel used.
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    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    600 USG! Like 2300 Liters. Yee Gawds man. No wonder a prop makes sense.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
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  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    We ran @4300 rpm and averaged 33 mph down river and 28 mph or so up river. Got 4 to 5 mpg burning 6 to 7 gph, so I was quite happy. The Extreme Shallow we took 2 years ago burnt 600 gallons plus 11 gallons of oil, so 234 gallons was cheap to me after that trip.
    Okay, I cannot wrap my head around the logistics of 600 gallons of fuel, gear, people, extreme shallow. Obviously you didn't carry all of that fuel at one time, but how did you do this? (Just curious really, I am sure there is something to learn here for me).

    thanks

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjjeeper View Post
    Okay, I cannot wrap my head around the logistics of 600 gallons of fuel, gear, people, extreme shallow. Obviously you didn't carry all of that fuel at one time, but how did you do this? (Just curious really, I am sure there is something to learn here for me).

    thanks
    The most fuel we had on board at any one time was 195 US Gallons, we had 10 each 15 gallon cans and would cache one on shore for everyone we would burn, so that on the way home we could pick up our fuel as we worked our way back.

    This is a video of that trip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BQtl2DVxKI
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  17. #17
    Member f0zzy2's Avatar
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    Default You dont need no stinking rack....

    Great video Steve, makes me wanna head down the Yukon. To bad my sport jet is just not cost effective enough.

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  18. #18
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    Two boats worked good for us, with the high water it was nice to run around in the little jon, it made less noise crashing through the alders to get to the bank. It was the first time we did this trip so it was all new to us.Attachment 64111Attachment 64112
    Hi all, Erik & Jodi

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