Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: ferry pilot through canada

  1. #1

    Default ferry pilot through canada

    Does anyone know if customs will have an issue with someone flying a plane not registered to them, how about if the registered owner meets them in northway? I may have a ferry pilot make the trip for me and I am looking at the route through canada.

    Also it appears that as long as jerry cans are carried, white horse can be by passed all together and haines junction is a 5000 ft strip, not my favorite idea to land it on gravel but my instructor said that as long as its rare and great care is taken it can work especailly with a strip that long. If he can fit 3 jerry cans with the back cusion taken out he could refuel in haines junction and perhaps in beaver creek, silver citys strip is a little short but burwash may work.

    Does anyone know if these strips are so rarely used that he could just pull off to the edge of the run way, quickly refuel and take right off again, the less taxi the less rocks are kicked up.

    Once he makes it to Northway we can meet them there and bring fuel and I could perhaps get in and finish up the trip from the front seat since tok and gulkana both have fuel

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    520

    Default

    I really doubt the ferry pilot will have an issue with the plane being registered to another. People ferry planes for others through Canada all the time and I haven't heard of any trouble over that.

    There wasn't a whole lot of traffic on the Alcan strips the couple of times I've flown through there, so I wouldn't anticipate any trouble with refueling on the side of the runway. I really don't think that slowly and carefully taxiing to the ramp is apt to increase the gravel damage, however. Touchdown is when most of the rocks are kicked up that can damage the plane.

    Nice Pitts, btw....Louis
    Louis Knapp

  3. #3

    Default

    I have flown the trip a few times in my planes and others. I would recommend landing in Whitehorse for fuel, then landing in Beaver Creek to refuel out of jugs. Avgas is readily available in Whitehorse and you have access to everything you need to clear customs. In Northway this spring Avgas was not available. You may want to call all anticipated fuel stops ahead of time, especially if auto gas is not available. Remember you now need to notify several agencies on both the American and Canadian side and they all have different prior reporting criteria before crossing the border. On the US side one of those notifications needs an internet connection and user ID set up in advance. You also need to keep to a tight schedule on when you are going to be where and some custom stations are only open certain hours during the day. On one of my trips we fueled jerry jugs in Whitehorse, then on to Beaver Creek to fill from the jugs and direct Fairbanks in a 172. This was because Northway customs would have been closed at our anticipated time of arrival and we really didn't want to stay the night in Whitehorse. Fairbanks Customs is 24 hrs available with prior notification.

    Make sure the pilot knows a flight plan is required for all flights in Canada. The Alaska Airmen's Association puts out a pilot logbook which is a great resource for pilots going through Canada. Money well spend on my first trip. I am not sure if it is updated with the current reporting requirements but you can get them from both the US and Canadian Customs. Make sure to get Canadian Maps and the Canadian Airport Directory, both are very helpful.

    What plane is being flown and what is the anticipated flight time/distance of each leg? It should be a blast, and the trips are always an adventure. If you need any more info, ask away or PM me. I am sure there are others on this forum with a lot of experience to share as well.

  4. #4

    Default

    No worries on who the plane is registered to in my experience. It would be nice if you wrote a letter as the registered owner, giving permission for the pilot to travel with the plane through Canada. I have traveled with and without the letter and never had to use it to prove it was ok for me to fly the plane.

  5. #5

    Default

    That is great information, right now it looks like we will get the weather up the coast on monday or tuesday so as long as nothing changes in the next few days I will be buying my instructor a ticket to sitka to pick the plane up along with the bladder cans. But if I get my permenant registration before he gets it out I will definitly revisit this thread. Thank you for the help.

  6. #6

    Default

    Was looking on the AOPA web site and I noticed that canada requires liability insurance (I already had to pay for ground coverage because of where my plane is currently hangared that I did not really want to pay for and I am basicly having the plane flown up and putting it in storage for the year so dont really want to drop another 1000$ for additional insurance for a one time flight). However the liability should cover me till next fall but my wife wants a new vehical so I cant keep accruing all these non trivial costs at the present time

    Also how hard is it to get a form 337 for storing fuel bladders in the front seat of the pitts? How hard is it to get a radio station licence?

    The big question is how much of a cost run up is all this bearucratic garbage going to cost, I know the form 337 is an FAA approval which means it likely involves an A&P/IA and is going to get expensive. What a head ach, looks like the coast is going to be the only option and if we cant make it out it has to stay there until spring, that way I have the entire winter to spend over 1000$ in additional fees and costs and paper work to make the canadian route doable.

  7. #7
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    Sitka to Gustvaus 85 NM
    Gustavus to Yakutat 140 NM
    Yakutat to Cordova 184 NM
    Cordova to Seward 134 NM

    OR Take off the wings, put in in a Conex and ship the thing with insurance.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  8. #8

    Default

    That is exactly correct. I bought 3 5.2 gal fuel bladders for my instructor in case he has to land at cape yakataga to refuel because that 185nm leg is the absolute max legal range of the pitts, any head wind will force a landing at yakataga. Also its only ~140nm up the copper to gulkana which does not involve flying over high mountians or open water. I should have the bladders wed and will get 5 gal of av gas on commercial drive and drive around with it in my truck to test it out, empty it out and pack them in a bag for my instructor. Instructor should be back on the 5th, have to see if there is a great chance he can make it and will have to buy his ticket the day before, I have to make sure that he can make it out because if we have to buy him a commercial flight back my wife will be an unhappy camper. Just looking at the general weather forcast I dont get that warm and fuzzy feeling, but we will see what flight services say the day before.

    If that were to happen the flight attempts would be over and we would crate it up in the spring and Uhaul it. Shipping containers have to be reinforced to a level that would be expensive and onurs to acomplish while we are on someone elses property. THough I am weary of taking the wings off becuase it is very difficult to get it back in rig and its easy to damage the wood if its not done exactly right.

    My instructor does not like the idea of training me in sitka so that I can fly it up myself but I am always in anchorage and can pick out an ideal weather day regardless of his schedule. The only reason it would be dangerous for me as a low time pilot is because of the leg between yakutat and cordova, if I am forced to land at yakataga that could be an issue if all we have to train on is pavement. Also it is extremely frustrating that an STC does not seem to exist for installing an inroute bladder tank with selector valve with an extra port on it and a fuel pump. This cant be the first time ever that someone has wanted to fly a pitts further than 230sm in one leg but I have had my mechanic do an STC search and he came back with nothing.

    If anyone finds an STC for installation of a soft bladder (most importantly how to tie it in to the regular fuel system) that would be great. If an STC lagitimatly does not exist, it may be an opprotunity for me to write the STC with the help of my mechanic and that way I could be the STC holder and make a few bucks on it, maybe even sell a kit that a mechanic can install.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    Was looking on the AOPA web site and I noticed that canada requires liability insurance (I already had to pay for ground coverage because of where my plane is currently hangared that I did not really want to pay for and I am basicly having the plane flown up and putting it in storage for the year so dont really want to drop another 1000$ for additional insurance for a one time flight). However the liability should cover me till next fall but my wife wants a new vehical so I cant keep accruing all these non trivial costs at the present time

    Also how hard is it to get a form 337 for storing fuel bladders in the front seat of the pitts? How hard is it to get a radio station licence?

    The big question is how much of a cost run up is all this bearucratic garbage going to cost, I know the form 337 is an FAA approval which means it likely involves an A&P/IA and is going to get expensive. What a head ach, looks like the coast is going to be the only option and if we cant make it out it has to stay there until spring, that way I have the entire winter to spend over 1000$ in additional fees and costs and paper work to make the canadian route doable.
    I think the radiotelephone license is still a freebie, and without the neccessity to learn codes. If I were you, I'd check the FARs to see what's the legal limit for avgas flown as a load, rather than in the tanks, though. I know that we all break the rules about that in Alaska when we fly canned avgas to the bush, but we don't all beak them when flying through Canada . . . . .

  10. #10

    Default

    What about that STC, is there a site where you can look up an exhaustive list of ALL STC's that exist for a given certified air frame?

  11. #11
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    I have been on the gravel at Cape Yakataga in Super Cubs, T-Craft, Citabrias, C-190s and a C-206... Even a Stinson...
    But I can't see it being all that wonderful for a Pitts with Wheel pants this time of year.
    Warm the engine first, then top off the fuel to max when the oil is hot and haul ***** straight out.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I have been on the gravel at Cape Yakataga in Super Cubs, T-Craft, Citabrias, C-190s and a C-206... Even a Stinson...
    But I can't see it being all that wonderful for a Pitts with Wheel pants this time of year.
    Warm the engine first, then top off the fuel to max when the oil is hot and haul ***** straight out.
    Am I guessing that the C-190 you mention is either a C-180 or a C-195 ???

    Aside from that, a good response with some pretty good advice !

  13. #13
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    Am I guessing that the C-190 you mention is either a C-180 or a C-195 ???
    Nope, it was a Cessna 190.... The 190 was the version with the smaller Continental R-670 (240 hp I think) engine. The bumps on the cowling looked a little different for some reason. The C-195s had the Jacobs motors on them.
    That one had been re-engined but the paperwork still said C190 since that was how it was born.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Nope, it was a Cessna 190.... The 190 was the version with the smaller Continental R-670 (240 hp I think) engine. The bumps on the cowling looked a little different for some reason. The C-195s had the Jacobs motors on them.
    That one had been re-engined but the paperwork still said C190 since that was how it was born.
    Thanks for that. I'm happy that, even at my age, I can still learn something every day !!!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •