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Thread: 4Wheeler Mattracks or Equivalent?

  1. #1
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    Default 4Wheeler Mattracks or Equivalent?

    I just did a quick search of the site seeking this info, but came up with nothing obvious in the first page of results. Perhaps I should've looked further, but figured I'd inquire via a thread.

    I'm contemplating a project that I would hope to finish putting together by next Fall, if finances permitted it.

    Anyway, I'm considering acquiring an older (perhaps later 90's to early 2000 series) Honda Foreman, etc., and some good used tracks to switch out the wheels/tiresd for something like Mattracks.

    If I can pull that off successfully, then I'd like to come up with a suitable meat wagon (possibly double-axle) with a cover, tie-downs for the top, and removable drains in the body.

    All of this would primarily be for a specific area I access on a fairly regular basis.

    Has anybody played with these things? Pros? Cons? Pulling a beefy meat wagon (no pun intended) with one of these things in fairly rugged terrain? More hype than functionality? Use in muskeg and notably wet areas such as moss over wet and permafrosted tundra that turns to quagmire all too quickly?

    If functional, what might a decent used set of tracks run that would give sufficient (improved) ground-clearance and consistent performance for the 4-wheeler referenced?

    Also, is there anything in particular that a person should look for, either in a new -or- used set of these type tracks, that would indicate whether or not they're in disrepair or have been abused?

    Thanks.

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    I re-entered my search query, limiting the tems to only 'Mattracks,' and came up with a number of threads that were pertinent to my inquiry.

    That said, I'd still be interested in any further input.

    My primary use would be mud and soft/wet terrain, rivers, creeks, etc., as we have a number of decent snowmachines, so snow travel isn't a primary focus for this project..

    Having viewed the Mattracks and Camoplast pages for a very general sense of pricing, I'm more confident that I'd be looking for good used/refurbished versions.

    Thanks.

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    I've got a set of Tatous 4s on a Grizzly 700. A buddy has a set of Mattracks on a Grizzly 700. Also 3 friends have Tatous 4s UTV models on the following machines, John Deere SxS (new Machine), Kawsaki SxS, and A suzki samari.
    We use them mostly in snow, but have a little experience in soft ground.

    First off in rocks or hard packed road with some rock sticking out, very hard on the tracks.

    Amazing flotation in very soft ground. But when you're stuck it can take awhile to get out.

    If there are any logs under the muck, they can get between the front and rear tracks and not be able to climb over the log. The track tend to dive under the log.

    Your fuel mileage will be between 4-8 mpg. Cruising speed 10 or so mph.

    Over all I'm very happy with the tracks.
    There is a set of Tatous 4s like new in a local paper here. They are asking $2800.

    Camoplast has a couple pictures of my machine in their brochure.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

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    Thanks.

    The trail I would primarily use this on is mostly either hard-pack dirt, muck, quagmire, etc. Very limited distance of any real gravel, other than for a few crossings.

    I'm curious about how they might do pulling a heavy meat trailer (double-axle, loaded with moose, camp, supplies, limited fuel, etc.) up moderately steep grades, or through quagmire/soft tundra-turned-to muck, as well as side-to-side shifts on the hard-pack soil?

    My research thus far indicates winches, come-alongs, and chainsaws should come as part of a standard tool kit with them. ;^>)

    But if they'll pull the previously mentioned load across that sort of terrain/soup, then that's what I'm looking for.

    I saw last night (though initially listed about a month-and-a-half ago) a 2000 Bombardier Traxter with Mattrack Litefoots and a dump-style meat trailer of the sort I've seen around town, for $4,900.00, with reportedly only 425 miles on the 4-wheeler, and original factory wheels and tires included in the deal. It was in anchorage. I'm not readily in Anchorage, and won't be for a bit..

    Yes, I was drooling, and kicking stuff....

    Thanks kindly for your in-put.

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    My tracks going across muddy clay will pull way more than my tires.
    I think the trick in pulling your meat wagon would be getting the most flotation as possible with the trailer.
    Another thing, speed doesn't always help with tracks. Most of the time when I start to lose traction, backing off on the throttle will get the tracks hooked up again.
    And don't break thru the root mat, if there is one.

    The tracks are geared down lower than tires. My top speed on hard packed snow is 39 mph in high range. I have plenty of power for pulling trailers. Your speed will just be slower.

    Also the side hill stability is very good with the tracks. I have to be careful when I go back to tires.

    Check out this site, probably the most active track site that I'm aware of.
    http://www.trackshare.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=103
    I go by the same user name on that site.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by travelers View Post
    My tracks going across muddy clay will pull way more than my tires.
    I think the trick in pulling your meat wagon would be getting the most flotation as possible with the trailer.
    Another thing, speed doesn't always help with tracks. Most of the time when I start to lose traction, backing off on the throttle will get the tracks hooked up again.
    And don't break thru the root mat, if there is one.

    The tracks are geared down lower than tires. My top speed on hard packed snow is 39 mph in high range. I have plenty of power for pulling trailers. Your speed will just be slower.

    Also the side hill stability is very good with the tracks. I have to be careful when I go back to tires.

    Check out this site, probably the most active track site that I'm aware of.
    http://www.trackshare.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=103
    I go by the same user name on that site.
    Thanks for your help.

    I wondered about using some of the track applications made for passive wheels/axles, such as on a double-axle meat trailer, but I specifically questioned whether the resistance from the passive tracks on a 2-axle meat trailer would be notably counter-productive/too much 'drag' to the machine's efforts. It sounds like you're implying that putting passive tracks on the meat trailer, giving it more floatation, would be preferred; yes?

    Thanks again.

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    Yes, I think flotation on the trailer will be the key. But I would try it with the tires on the trailer first, just to see.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  8. #8

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    Just as a heads up, if you run tracks out of snow it will be hard on your axles (specifically your CV's) so be careful about not hittin the power too fast and turns....blew both front on my 12 ranger going 3 MPH about 7deg uphill....that was about 4 miles of no snow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimunist View Post
    Just as a heads up, if you run tracks out of snow it will be hard on your axles (specifically your CV's) so be careful about not hittin the power too fast and turns....blew both front on my 12 ranger going 3 MPH about 7deg uphill....that was about 4 miles of no snow.
    Huh.. I know tracks require more power to revolve than tires do, I heard a recent report about a power-steering box going out as a result of steering (I assume from a stopped position) with tracks, and I've read about heavy wear/damage to rubber tracks from rocky or other coarse surfaces, as well as some other cautions, but I hadn't yet heard of folks blowing out CVs.

    I'll try to research that, especially as I get closer to putting this project together (assuming I get that far, though I intend to try..)

    Thanks for the report. I'll keep it in mind.

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    Something else to be aware of. If going down a steep hill and you hit the bottom with the tracks turned, the impact of hitting the bottom will force the front tracks to turn more than designed. This will cause the broken CV joints mentioned above.
    The tracks stick out an extra foot to the front, that's a lot of leverage if you hit something hard with the tracks turned.
    I have cable steering stops on my Yamaha (they came with the tracks). That prevents the problem, but I still avoid the situation.
    A friend went down a steep cut bank and tried to turn a 90 at the bottom (the back tracks still on the hill), broke a few things when the tracks where forced to turn sharper than designed.
    Here are some pictures of the cable stops.
    http://www.trackshare.com/forum/show...t=45974&page=2
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by travelers View Post
    Something else to be aware of. If going down a steep hill and you hit the bottom with the tracks turned, the impact of hitting the bottom will force the front tracks to turn more than designed. This will cause the broken CV joints mentioned above.
    The tracks stick out an extra foot to the front, that's a lot of leverage if you hit something hard with the tracks turned.
    I have cable steering stops on my Yamaha (they came with the tracks). That prevents the problem, but I still avoid the situation.
    A friend went down a steep cut bank and tried to turn a 90 at the bottom (the back tracks still on the hill), broke a few things when the tracks where forced to turn sharper than designed.
    Here are some pictures of the cable stops.
    http://www.trackshare.com/forum/show...t=45974&page=2
    I wonder how many of these instances involving broken gear are the result of persons not using the steering cables? Do the cables come with ALL of the kits?

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