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Thread: Spey rod question

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    Member kantill's Avatar
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    Default Spey rod question

    I have thinking of getting a spey rod for my 9 to 10 weight setup and have one question. Can you use the as a normal fly rod as well as a spey rod? I.E. can you cast them with the normal back cast and side cast as you would with a normal fly rod? Sorry if this seems like a dumb question but I can't seem to find the answer on the web.

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    depends on the rod you get, there are a lot of switch rods out there now that allow that, but my 2 14' rods and 13'6 do not allow for regular casting.

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    Ya if your wanting to go both ways I'd get a switch rod. Most spey rods are BIG rods.

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    Member kantill's Avatar
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    Thanks guys

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    Switch rod for sure. You get a lot of versatility with a switch set up. Do you plan to swing or dead drift with it? You will more than likely find that you will need 2 spools of 2 different lines to accommodate doing both. I have a 7wt 11ft Z Axis Switch thats become my all around go too stick!
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    Quote Originally Posted by Franken Fish View Post
    Switch rod for sure. You get a lot of versatility with a switch set up. Do you plan to swing or dead drift with it? You will more than likely find that you will need 2 spools of 2 different lines to accommodate doing both. I have a 7wt 11ft Z Axis Switch thats become my all around go too stick!
    To be honest I don't know, I am still a noob when it comes to fly fishing in general. But I hope to target some slivers and kings one of these days and don't think my rod that I have is the best option for them. I have been watching some fly fishing videos and they keep talking about spey rods and I was thinking maybe I could get something that could do both.

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    Member DannerAK's Avatar
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    You can overhead cast a Spey rod, but they are heavy and long so fatigue will set in. Dead drifting is possible with a change to a floating tip but a Spey setup favors swinging heavy flys on sink tips with the ability to cast long distances with no back cast. I started using one this season and love it.

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    Member kantill's Avatar
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    Yeah I am now thinking that it's not a good idea, thanks guys.

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    I would love to get into a switch rod this fall. I fly fish as exclusivley as I can but can't seem to cast any farther than 30ft with any accuracy, so a switch rod seems to be the ticket. any good resources for learning the technique? (other than youtube) I have been told you can't learn to cast it on the lawn because you need the resistance of the water, also i have noticed a lot of guys have 3 different colors of line, after your backing do you run a proline floating line then your sink tip fly line? I've been eyeing the temple forks at sportsmans, but have never owned a temple fork rod, any thoughts?

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    Member DannerAK's Avatar
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    Can't say for certain about switch line setups, but on my spey setup there is backing, running line, skagit shooting head, and then the MOW tip of choice. That means 4 or 5 colors on the reel.

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    My switch is set up the same way. As for temple fork rods I think they are ok for the money, but would stay away from the new BVK ones. Heard of a bunch of them breaking this summer than even my brother broke his.

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    If you are wanting to practice in the lawn, use some heavy mono and tie about a 9-10 foot leader of blood knots leaving about 1 inch of tag on both sides about 2 inches between each knot. No it is not the same as on the water, but you can get some real good basics down and a great start before hitting the water. How these long rods load is real hard for some to understand, a grass leader will give good info without the pressure of fishing.

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    Skagit setups are the main way to go around here with the short, heavy heads meant for swinging heavy streamers on heavy sinktips. This setup doesn't allow for overhead casting, it's very useful for when you have little to no clear space behind you and alot of river in front of you.

    I'm still a beginner, but I do know that people use spey rods overhead when surf casting them. You can't use the skagit heads since they are too heavy and short.

    You also have longer, lighter Scandi style lines that use less anchor and more line in the air. They are designed to throw lighter flies and require alot more room behind you to execute. It's more like an overhead cast.

    I have a 14' spey and an 10'6" switch. I find the switch a bit harder to use when casting skagit style, but I can chuck n duck with it. Like I said, I'm still a noob at two handers, but I do like the speys with a skagit line.

  14. #14
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VXP6129 View Post
    Casting a Switch rod is the same as a full Spey with the exception that you need to tighten up your movements since you don't have as long of a head/leader as a full blown Spey.
    Depends entirely upon the line chosen.

    With all things being equal, switch rods ARE slightly more difficult for the beginner to cast, but for the simple reason that with a shorter rod, the movement and timing must be more precise - longer rod = more forgiving.

    If you search "switchrod" and/or "speyrod" on this forum, or bop on over to www.speypages.com, there is a good chance that you will answer all of your questions

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