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Thread: Barnes tsx and ttsx thoughts

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default Barnes tsx and ttsx thoughts

    Perhaps this belongs in the shooting forum, but the "what gear rocked" thread had an interesting discussion on the barnes bullets.

    I used the 180 grains barnes tsx with great success on my winny mag. Started using the 200 grain tsx on the 325 WSM. No issues for two straight moose hunts. Last year I drilled a bull through the heart, recovering the bullet in the front shoulder. Looked exactly as it should have. I did a follow up shot, even though the bull didn't need it. We recovered that bullet as well, but just under the hide on the rib cage. No expansion, just ran a foot under the hide.

    I loved the bullet for years, I have friends who have killed dang near everything in Alaska and Africa with it, and have had no problems. However confidence in your gear is a funny thing. I switched to Nosler Accubonds and my gun just absolutly loves them, I mean REALLY loves them.

    Any other barnes issues?
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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I would comment but all of mine and my friends have passed right through the animals and kept on going, end result the animals died right there so I say they work for me.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Thanks for moving this discussion.

    My thoughts are....
    Velocity upon impact and tissue density effect performace. I believe that a pure double lung hit doesn't expand tsx well because tissue density is low. That same concept applies in the body(guts ect..)So conceptually a bullet that impacts dense tissue/bone upon the first few inches of its trajectory will likely expand well and disperse quality hydrostatic force. A bullet that's able to travel a long distance within the animal before impacting dense tissue may have lost enough energy to reduce or eliminate petaling. So a quartering to shot that first impacts the chest cleanly may then move rearward and a hunter could find an intact bullet. In reverse a quartering away shot that accidentally impacts a leg would expand upon impact then cause carnage. Please keep in mind all this depends greatly on round selection, shot distance, and velocity. Throw in the variable of tissue thickness and density and you've got yourself a big ????

    Are they good rounds? Yes, I'll load up another batch for my two main rifles this weekend. I think I'll take a 300g tsx in my .416 after elk next week.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Bighorse I agree with your theory. I really think velocity plays a huge role in Barnes bullets properly expanding and I am sure tissue density plays a part as well.

  5. #5

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    Have recovered a "few bullets" from animals. When in Africa, it was the first time I used tsx in the .300wsm and we never recovered a bullet and that is including a kudu, 2 oryx, and a mountain zebra. I've recovered a few from moose after penetrating all the way through and bulging on the other side and all were perfect. I have seen a couple that did nothing like your picture shows. One thing that I am very careful of is getting the tip full of dirt, etc, or damaging the tips. I tend to think they perform like a solid rather than what they should. I might be way off target on that though. Recovered a tipped tsx this past week from a big bull moose and it was perfect. The bear shot couldn't "hold" the tsx in.

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    Member AK375HH's Avatar
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    Default Barnes tsx and ttsx thoughts

    I haven't recovered a tsx yet. I love them, they kill animals well lol. But I have recovered accubonds. I won't use them again. Shot a brown bear at 40 yards. -06. Went for the shoulder. I found 5 different bullet chunks in the shoulder. That bullet blew up within inches of entering the bear. I need one to hold together longer than that. The other two shots hit the neck and jaw and weren't recovered.
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    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK375HH View Post
    I haven't recovered a tsx yet. I love them, they kill animals well lol. But I have recovered accubonds. I won't use them again. Shot a brown bear at 40 yards. -06. Went for the shoulder. I found 5 different bullet chunks in the shoulder. That bullet blew up within inches of entering the bear. I need one to hold together longer than that. The other two shots hit the neck and jaw and weren't recovered.
    Seems like nearly all bullets work "most of the time" and all bullets do funny things on occasion. I have fired half a dozen Accubonds from my -06 into grizzlys at fairly short range. The only one I recovered was on a hard raking going away shot. Hit the right hip on entry and was pulled from under the skin on the left front shoulder. Perfectly mushroomed.

    My experience with Accubonds is that they will often lose some lead from the tip when they start to expand, but once the mushroom hits the thick part of the jacket, it stops and the bullet penetrates great. Obviously some people have different experiences, just like some people have variable experience with the TSX series.

    Yk

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    I shoot the 180g accubond's out of my 300wsm and they have worked great. velocity is right at 3050fps. This year i ended up hitting a caribou in the shoulder, not exactly where i wanted, but the front part of the bullet did what it should have, it blew a huge hole in the shoulder bone while the back half retained all of its weight,and i found it in the opposite shoulder. That was at 200 yards. fpr a while i was sold the berger vld's hunter because of how well they shot at long range, but if you want to see a bullet come apart and do nothing on bone give them a try.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    I would comment but all of mine and my friends have passed right through the animals and kept on going, end result the animals died right there so I say they work for me.
    This reflects my experience as well.
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    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I've been shooting a .300 win mag, a .325 wsm and now a .300 wsm for about 10 years now. 180gr and 200gr bullets. Never recovered one of them. Through and through every time. Never had an animal get further than about 20 yards and always with one shot.

    I'd sure like to find one of my bullets one of these days.

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    Shot my moose last week with 300WSM with Barnes TSX 180gr.

    First shot anchored him and was a pass through of vitals at 175 yards. Finishing shot was quartering away at 150 yards and broke rib on both sides before settling under skin.


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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I'll say outright that I think the Barnes TSX is a good bullet...but I think the on game performance is too variable for my taste. I've seen several photos and recovered bullets like the one below- no expansion and a few that could literally be reloaded and fired again.

    I think the Barnes depends heavily upon velocity and (as Bighorse pointed out) dense tissue to start upset and expansion. I think in the high speed cartridges like the Weatherby and so forth the Barnes is the bullet but in more moderate cartridges I prefer the Accubond for most all purposes. I do shoot 300gr TSX in my .375 Ruger because I carry it for grizzly and I want a lot of penetration on a near point blank shot.

    I think for hunting ungulates in cartridges under 3000fps the Barnes is generally more of a hindrance than a help and the TTSX is something of an improvement in that area.

    My $.02
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