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Thread: What gear and camo for goat hunt?

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    Default What gear and camo for goat hunt?

    Im going to be doing a goat hunt real soon and was what gear do you usually take and which camo works the best.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyakadayday View Post
    Im going to be doing a goat hunt real soon and was what gear do you usually take and which camo works the best.
    Camo is dealers choice,, I have had luck using over whites.

    Please, Please, Please, be careful. Couple guys died last year Goat hunting and one has already fell to his death this year. As someone who almost fell to my death Goat hunting, Crampons, and Ice/Axe trekking pole combo are required gear.

    Remember that it is much easier to climb up than it is to come down sometimes. Whenever possible come back down the same way you go up.

    Be safe and have a great hunt

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Member mtnclimber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyakadayday View Post
    Im going to be doing a goat hunt real soon and was what gear do you usually take and which camo works the best.
    Where are you going? Boat Based or Tent based? More specifics will help for getting gear recommendations

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default What gear and camo for goat hunt?

    With this short of time left it would seem a better angle for you to post up how you will be hunting and what you have now that you plan to take and ask for opinions based on that info.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Camo is largely unnecessary for goats. If possible, get above them and hunt down. Whites might be worth a shot, but eyesight isn't their primary means of defense - living in inaccessible terrain is.

    For general gear questions, take a look at the sheep gear lists thread in the gear forum. That should cover it pretty well other than the goat-specific stuff like crampons, climbing rope, and such that some goat hunters carry.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    How about a good partner that knows the ins and outs of goat identification. A partner that knows how to safely navigate alpine terrain. A partner with a good spotter too. Did I mention you should have a partner? Spot device, sat phone, quality shelter

    A big billy is too much for one man to handle in one load. Think full sized Caribou bull on your back navigating and climbing.

    Goats are more dangerous than bears and often the trouble sneeks up on ya and you don't know your in it until too late.

    Be safe and have fun!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Listen to Bighorse. If anyone knows goats, it's him, and that is some sage advice he laid out for you there. No doubt that a capable partner/guide should be at the top of your list.

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    Crampons/calked boots and trekking pole are invaluable. I thought it was overkill but found out different!!!

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Count me amongst the lucky ones who took a tumble on a goat hunt and didn't get hurt too bad. Stiff boots and crampons are a must. So are trekking poles or at least full size "walking" axe.

    Goats are fairly tolerant and you can generally get within a long-ish rifle shot (300-400 yds) without too much difficulty.

    The most important consideration when hunting goats is terrain. Where will he fall? Can you get there? And most importantly, Can you get back out with 65-130lbs on your back?

    Rule of thumb: If you can't get to where the goat will likely come to rest without using both hands...DON'T SHOOT.
    Be patient and wait for your billy to stop on a bench or a saddle. Shooting him off of a jagged cliff face is a disservice to the goat and put your in jeopardy on the meat recovery.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    I have a pretty good hunt partner going with me. We will be tent based hunting in 14C RG868. I was thinking of over whites too i do have a set. How has the hunts been in that area been for you all?

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyakadayday View Post
    I have a pretty good hunt partner going with me. We will be tent based hunting in 14C RG868. I was thinking of over whites too i do have a set. How has the hunts been in that area been for you all?
    868 is where I killed my goat. PM me.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    With the weather the way it's been lately it's going to be your biggest challenge. The worst beating I ever took in a tent was on this registration hunt. I had a pretty quality four season tent and the wind was blowing so hard it was pushing water through the fly. Spent the night waiting for the tent poles to snap, but luckily escaped with just a couple bent poles. Every once and a while it would let up just long enough for you to hear the next roar of wind coming over the mountain to flatten you.

    Bring a good four season tent! That wind can come from Prince William Sound over the mountains with a vengeance. Three season tent will not cut it.

    Also, I hope you like alders. What what was planned for a half day hike turned into a full day and part of the next and we still didn't make it to our original destination. Climbing over and pushing your way though takes a toll and will wear you out long before you thought you would be. So plan your travel time accordingly.

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    I am a little concerned about the weather especially atop a mountain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    868 is where I killed my goat. PM me.
    Wont let me pm

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyakadayday View Post
    I am a little concerned about the weather especially atop a mountain.
    As you should be, given the weather we've had of late. My wife and I are still hoping to hunt her goat tag, but we've been kept off the mountain more often than not. Call us fair-weather hunters, but if we can't see the cliffs and can't keep our feet from slipping, there are better ways to spend a day.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Great call Brian. That's a smart decision. Depth perception is way off in poor visibility. When judging an all white animal against a white background mistakes are made. A few of my nanny kills have been due to poor visibility. This year I passed on shooting a mature goat at about 30 yrds because I couldn't clearly identify sex in the poor vis. Of course clouds can help in stalking situations. A constant windy rainy pattern is just miserable.
    I know I'm preaching to the choir about this subject. Nobody likes being socked in, in the alpine.
    On many occasions I've climbed into the soup in hopes it would clear while on the ridge. Two years ago I waited three days for vis ability. The goat was dead within five hours of clearing. You also risk spooking all the goats via scent without even knowing it in poor vis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Camo is dealers choice,, I have had luck using over whites.

    Please, Please, Please, be careful. Couple guys died last year Goat hunting and one has already fell to his death this year. As someone who almost fell to my death Goat hunting, Crampons, and Ice/Axe trekking pole combo are required gear.

    Remember that it is much easier to climb up than it is to come down sometimes. Whenever possible come back down the same way you go up.

    Be safe and have a great hunt

    Steve
    I am going to hijack a little and chime in with Steve and say be careful also... I have fallen in the mountains from a bad grab on a rotten rock and got lucky as I only fell a short distance and didnt go off the cliff.. I walked away a little bloody and a little broken.. Also have a fellow guide and very good friend the reached for a goat or sheep(forget which) and went with it off a cliff and bounced his way down a lonnnng way and IIRC broke his back in a few places amoung other things... things can happen real fast out there so be patient in your choices out there...

    camo well go for good clothing first worry bout camo second...

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Ya, in regards to going down the same way you've accended. Thats a rule not to be taken lightly. Take the time to route your exit on the accent. Make carines, ribbon rocks, whatever! Just know that the best way down is likely the way you've been able to accend. If the hillside is covered in vegetation there are hazards hidden all over the place in goat country. Thats where they thrive.

    Be patient with goats....If you seen them in a good feed location, wait there and don't even bother looking in the cliffs. I once bivy right above a feed zone, like 200 yrds away. Right at last light while eating a MH my goat walked out onto a nice green medow. Boom! It was the nicest goat I've got.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default What gear and camo for goat hunt?

    Even when you think you are out of the nasty stuff don't drop your guard! I thought I was "down" and dropped off a knife ridge in the trees. Climbed over a deadfall and when I put my feet down I to the tall grass on the other side the ground went away. Luckily I still had hold of the tree as I nearly walked right off a 50' cliff!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Even when you think you are out of the nasty stuff don't drop your guard! I thought I was "down" and dropped off a knife ridge in the trees. Climbed over a deadfall and when I put my feet down I to the tall grass on the other side the ground went away. Luckily I still had hold of the tree as I nearly walked right off a 50' cliff!
    been there....cliffing out is very easy to do especially in certain mountains and conditions..and can make for a hair raising ordeal especially with a loaded down pack ..

    just cause it looks like an easy way to go just always make sure you can see all the way down to the bottom.. I have cliffed out 50' above the river bottom before and had to climb back up over a 1000 feet to go around and get down....As pointed out already it is always a great idea when in unfamillar terrain to come out the way you go in..

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