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Thread: Fellas, how about your favorite bread/bannock recipe?

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    Default Fellas, how about your favorite bread/bannock recipe?

    Now that the temp is cooling off, nothing is better than the smell of home made bread. How about a few recipes, either from the iron skillet at the campsite or at home in the oven. Don't forget the photos if you have them!

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    Well I guess so much for that idea. I'll just buy it at Fred Meyers.

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    Rhodes bread in the frozen section!

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    Try this one... it's a no fail esp because everyone variates their bannock to their own taste/liking (sweeter, not too sweet, etc.)

    4 c flour (all white, all wheat or mix half and half)
    1 heaping T baking powder
    1-2 heaping T sugar (to your taste) more sugar will darken bannock faster in pan
    a pinch to 1/2 tsp salt

    Mix together well; add about 3 cups water. This is also where you can get creative... less water will allow you to form into rounds with your hands; more water if you just want to spoon it into the pan (not so messy); if you spoon it into the pan, use your spoon to flatten it down abit. Make sure there are a couple of holes through the dough... it helps to cook the dough evenly and eliminates the crevices you can get if you don't poke holes through...

    The oil should be quite hot so be careful; cook until golden and flip. Enjoy with homemade jam!

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    Here's a baked bannock recipe that you can also variate to your taste:

    4 c flour
    2 1/2 T baking powder
    2 T sugar
    1 tsp salt
    2 c water and 2 T oil OR 2 c milk, 1 egg and 2 T oil
    Mix adding flour last; stir all together just until sticky, don't beat;

    lightly oil pan; cook in 450 oven 30-40 minutes

    Add berries, shredded cheese, etc. to variate taste

    Enjoy!

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    Thanks guys, will be giving them a try this year in the mountains.

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    Thumbs up Baking bread, one of life's great pleasures . .

    Here you go . . a very basic French bread recipe from Julia Child's The Way To Cook:

    3-1/2 cups flour
    1-1/4 tsp salt
    1/4 tsp sugar
    1-1/3 cups water
    1 scant tsp yeast

    Get the yeast going for 15-20 minutes in a cup of warm water; mix all the dry ingredients (I use a Bosch mixer); add the water and knead for 8 minutes or so or until the dough is pliable and silky.

    Heat your oven @ 350˚ for one minute and turn off; cover and place dough in oven and let rise for an hour or so; remove, knock down, shape or place in bread pan/s, cover and place in oven for second rise; remove when doubled or so and bake at 425 for 20-25 minutes until browned and interior temperature reads 190˚ to 200˚.

    This is my basic recipe which I play with to no end—I always use a mixture of flours—predominantly whole wheat that I grind myself—including unbleached white, rye, spelt, etc. I usually use a Tbsp of organic molasses in place of sugar and often add sunflower, pumpkin, or other seeds. I usually add a Tbsp or so of olive oil as well.

    Experiment, have fun. Keep us posted . . . oh, yeah, almost forgot the most important ingredient . . a bottle of Merlot or Chardonnay makes the whole process much more enjoyable . . and more civilized . .

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    Cool Extreme bannock . . .

    And speaking of bannock which is essentially a soda bread, if you want to experiment, try this site. Here's a sample of what they offer (scroll down to the Cheese Beer Bread—very good)
    *****************

    Guinness Bread

    1 cup rolled oats (regular, additional)
    2 cups wheat flour
    1/2 cup brown sugar
    2 tsps baking soda
    1 tsp baking powder
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/4 cup melted butter2 tsps vanilla extract
    1 cup buttermilk
    12 ozs beer (guinness)


    1 Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Grease an 8x8 inch baking pan.
    2 Mix together the oats, flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in a bowl. In a separate large bowl, stir together the butter, vanilla, buttermilk, and Guinness® beer. Pour the flour mixture into the beer mixture, and gently stir until well blended. Pour batter into the prepared baking pan, and sprinkle with additional oats if desired.
    3 Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes, then turn the temperature down to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C), and bake for an additional 30 minutes. Turn the oven off, open the door, and allow to cool for 30 minutes in the oven before turning out onto a wire rack.

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    We typically stay in stock with our home-made whole wheat sourdough bread (made in regular loaves, sourdough french bread, larger round loaves, etc., to different consistencies and crusts, depending on the desire at that time), for which we keep 2 qt. jars of starter in the refrigerator. We're out of the bread at the moment, though that's to be remedied this evening, through tomorrow...

    You can use a number of methods to make your starter dough, finding recipes for them on-line if you wish. (Our starter is a number of years old now).

    If you happen to have some high-starch spuds that you like (we grow ours), and you're in the mood to make some potato salad while you're at it, or perhaps even some mashed spuds, then saving the water you boiled your spuds in, and setting it aside in a jar on the counter-top, at room temperature, with some whole wheat flour, is my preferred method for beginning a starter dough.

    If you want to cheat on your starter, you can add a pinch of yeast and some/tiny amount of gluten, but if you're more patient, just the spud water and the whole wheat flour should do the trick.

    ** Don't over-fill your qt. jars with your starter mix, or the shelving inside your refrigerator will get ugly QUICK. When replenishing the starter with more flour and water to keep it alive, always try to leave at least an inch-and-a-half of space below the top of the jar (perhaps a touch more, even). It rises like the bread, but is thinner, meaning that it'll crawl out across your fridge shelving like the blob monster.

    When making the bread, we'll take a bit over half the starter from each qt. jar, and set it in a large pyrex glass mixing bowl, adding more whole wheat flour and water to the dough to the consistency of thick pancake batter, then covering and letting it sit on the counter for most of a day, then adding more whole wheat flour and water over time, letting each addition of flour and water ferment and sour, until we arrive at the amount of dough we desire (often enough for four loaves of bread in a standard-size loaf pan).

    I'll finish the process with another post later today, or tomorrow, as I've got to get crackin' right now on some other chores that are languishing. It'll take you a while to get your starter going anyway. ;^>)

    BTW, you can use this same starter for whole wheat sourdough pancakes (my kids are burned out on them, but I'm not...), and you can add any number of modifications to those that make for an incredible breakfast, along side some moose breakfast sausage. Fresh/frozen blueberries and/or raspberries are a couple of my favorites, with the cakes lightly covered in a decent butter, and some pure maple syrup, with the moose breakfast sausage dipped in the excess maple syrup as it runs off the cakes..;^>)

    More later re. the final bread product.

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    Question

    ruffle,

    If you were going to substitute your sourdough starter for the yeast in my bread recipe above, how much would you use and for how long would you let it rise?

    I have in the past and with good results, cut the yeast in my recipe to 1/4 tsp, mix, and let the dough do its first rise in the fridge overnight.

    Would such be possible using your starter?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    ruffle,

    If you were going to substitute your sourdough starter for the yeast in my bread recipe above, how much would you use and for how long would you let it rise?

    I have in the past and with good results, cut the yeast in my recipe to 1/4 tsp, mix, and let the dough rise in the fridge overnight.

    Would such be possible using your starter?
    Thanks Marcus.

    Refrigeration slows down both the fermentation and rising of the starter. Sometimes that's a good thing, as it will keep the critters alive longer, such as our stored starter, until you're ready to use it next time, or for when you're ready to bake. The less the amount of yeast in a mix, whether added or naturally occurring, the longer it will take to 'breed' to the point that you have a viable dough to put into the oven. But it will rise properly, eventually, unless something kills it..

    In most cases, at our house, we want the stuff to sour as soon as possible (hard to shake the age of immediate gratification, even with historic items like sourdough. )

    The whole process, at least as we do it, is letting a dough of whole wheat flour and water be fermented by the sourdough we've added in the beginning. (If you smell a good sourdough starter, you'll likely note not only the 'sour' smell, but a hint of alcohol; it's literally fermenting, but not enough typically to kill the yeast.)

    That said, the greater the ratio of sourdough to recently-added flour/ingredients, the faster it's apt to complete its 'mission.'

    As to the time frame, when it reaches the degree of 'sourness' (an olfactory thing for us, though sometimes curtailed by time and other demands), then it's time to begin the final additions.

    We still use a bit of gluten in the final mix, and a modest amount of honey (and sometimes a touch of maple syrup) for sweetener and food for the yeasties.

    This whole kick began when I was diagnosed with an illness that I was able to manage by monitoring glucose and modifying the ingredients in our diet. I LIKE/LOVE eating good, and the thought of not being able to eat good food of the sort I often desire, literally made the outlook quite dismal; very seriously.

    Fortunately, as a result of flexibility in how we make what we do in the kitchen, as well as my own disorder being of a type, and at a stage that I was able to manage it purely with diet and activity, rather than having to use medications, we made the transition. And, though I've become less 'fundamentalist' in my approach to my eating habits than I might've been a couple years ago, and eating the occasional 'borderline items,'' the changes have worked well.

    This bread recipe (which I'll finish this afternoon or tonight, I hope) was a product of that process.

    We use (almost exclusively) honey and maple syrup as sweeteners now, with the occasional minor touch of molasses for the brown-sugar-taste in some Szechuan recipes, and in my home-made barbecue sauces.

    It's typically difficult to take stuff out of store-bought items, and fairly easy to add what you want in home-made stuff.

    More on the bread later on.

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    After the 4-loaf quantity of the bread starter in the bowl has had an opportunity to sufficiently sour (up to a couple of days or so), add:

    2/3-cup to 1-1/4 cup olive oil

    1/2-cup or so of honey

    5 tsp salt

    3/4-cup gluten flour

    (If you desire the 'cheating method' of adding yeast, add it at this time; about 1-2 TBSP, less if desired, or none at all if you're a traditionalist/purist).

    Add whole wheat flour until it reaches the consistency you desire for your bread dough.

    If using yeast, you can make the dough a bit stiffer. If not using yeast, leave it a bit 'doughier.'

    Knead for at least 10", then cover and let rise until at least doubled. It may take longer if the dough is either thicker, or you used no yeast.

    You can place a small amount of olive oil in the bottom of your bowl, and rotate the dough ball in this until covered enough to seal it. A softer dough, more olive oil (within reason), and a hotter temperature in the oven, with a pan of water below the bread, will/may assist in reaching for a french bread-like crust.

    Separate into loaf size pieces, turning the dough into itself at the bottom of each piece, in the realtive shape of your intended loaves, and place into greased loaf pans, or on top of flat bread baking sheets/pans. Allow to rise again to double the size of the dough after it was shaped into loaves.

    When loaves have finished the second rising, take a sharp knife and make a shallow cut down the center of the loaves.

    Bake at 350 degrees f. for regular loaves, or 390 - 400 f. for french bread loaves. 45 minutes for regular large-size loaves. less or more depending on the size and type of loaves.

    When the bread looks done, smells done, and the bottom of the loaf sounds firm and hollow when you rap on it firmly with your knuckles, it's done. (My wife says she judges it by the crust, since it's very hot.)

    You may need to experiment with oven temperatures and times for your specific oven and altitude.

    I'll post the whole wheat sourdough pancake recipe we use later on; back to work!!

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    I went on a quick-and-dirty search for a cheater's sourdough starter recipe using something similar to our original.

    I came up with one that uses peeled potatoes, and mashes them into the boiling water (a waste of good spuds, in my opinion, as the boiling water carries sufficient sugars/starch to begin the yeast feeding frenzy if using good spuds, but to each their own).

    Also, old-timers and lab technicians alike will often tell folks that there's enough naturally occurring yeast in most (natural) home environments to not necessarily require adding yeast to the starter mix to get it to begin doing its action, but again, to each their own, and a more rapid beginning to your starter means that you can be making bread, dinner rolls, and hot cakes, etc., all the quicker. Though if you don't give your bowl of starter and dough a sufficient chance to sour, you'll not have the rich sourdough flavor that some like so much (and others dislike so much..)

    Anyway, in the starter recipe I sought out this morning, take 2 cups of potato boiling water with the spuds mashed into it, sans skins, and, after cooling, add 2 cups of flour of your choice (we use only whole wheat). Add a pinch or so of yeast, and, if you're worried that the spuds you used are lacking in lots of starch/sugars, then you may add either a TBSP or so of sugar (we don't use it at all in this sort of thing), or perhaps a TBSP of maple syrup or honey. The sweetener is merely a yeast booster. Let the mixture sit in a bowl or jar for several days, covered by a breathable cover, until it's clear that it's been fermenting/rising, has obvious yeast action going on (with no molds present), etc. If using jars, we often take a sandwich bag (because they're tougher than mere food wrap), poke a few holes through it so the air can escape from the yeast action, place the bag over the jar with use of a standard Ball or Kerr band without the metal disc that typically acts as the actual lid, and, after 3-5 days, stirring with a WOODEN spoon once or so each day, place the covered BREATHABLE jar/bowl in the refrigerator for storage.

    When working with sourdough, in general, try to use a clean wooden spoon.

    You'll want to stir it every now and then, and if you're not using it regularly, you'll want to occasionally take some out to make enough room for equal parts flour and water (nothing else) for the dough to 'feed' on at these times. This provides an opportunity to share your starter with others.

    Again, make sure to leave at least 1-1/2" space between the freshly added flour and water so that your starter dough can rise in the jar without creeping all over the inside of your refrigerator, because, afterall, who needs more chores?

    When allowed to sit for a period of time, unused, in the refrigerator, you'll witness your starter separating. Don't be alarmed. If you sniff it, it should still smell like your sourdough starter, albeit perhaps a touch more sour. Stir it up, replace the cover, and go about your business 'til the next stirring/use/addition of flour and water.

    Anyway, after you've mastered your sourdough starter, you may wish to make what I believ are the BEST sourdough pancakes I've eer had; at home, at fish camp, etc. Bar none.

    -2-1/4 to 2-1/3 cups sourdough
    -2 TBSP, plus or minus, honey or maple syrup
    -Slightly less than 3/4 tsp salt
    -1/3-cup canola oil
    -2 eggs
    -1 tsp baking soda
    -1 TBSP warm H2O
    -1, plus cups blueberries or raspberries, or other berry of your choice. or a blend of berries if you desire.. Add a touch of extra honey (or other preferred sweetener) to the berries.

    Mix your sourdough, honey/maple syrup, salt, and canola oil in a mixing bowl, then, when thoroughly mixed, but not -overly- mixed, gently fold in the berries, trying not to decimate them; I know I've been successful when my dough is still more or less the color it started out as, rather than purple or pink, but the pancakes will still eat fine if you're gruff with the berries; just not as attractive visually.

    Place the baking soda and warm water in a metal or glass measuring cup until the baking soda is dissolved, and, -very- gently, evenly fold the water and baking soda mixture into the dough.

    The mix should be just slightly thicker than batter for blintzes. Thin pancake batter is what you're aiming for.

    Heat griddle to standard hot-cake temperature; we use somewhere near 350 to 375, though on a camp stove or wood-fired cook stove, you'll see whether or not the outside is cooking too fast, and leaving the inside doughy. If that's the case, your griddle is probably too hot. Let them get good and golden brown on the down-side before flipping, as they can be fairly delicate little buggers if you've added berries; the berries provide a sort of cleavage like fragmentation lines in rock, so that's where they'll 'break' if you abuse them. And, again, who wants ugly cakes?

    Butter them as soon as they come off the griddle, and pour modest amouts of maple syrup or home-made berry syrups over them.

    Hopefully you've been frying up some moose breakfast sausage patties while your hot-cakes were finishing on the griddle, as the patties will go very nicely with the run-off syrups, no matter what type you've used, be it berry syrup or maple syrup.

    Don't store the mixture too long.. The soda loses its impact over a short period of time. The batter will still be good later on, but not as rewarding as when it was fresh.

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    The UAF Extension Service publishes good info on sourdough. Find it here: http://www.uaf.edu/files/ces/publica.../FNH-00061.pdf

    Best way to obtain sourdough starter is to ask someone to share some of theirs. My starter is likely older than I am. I got it from a friend over 10 years ago , who got it from a friend 20 years before that, who got it from a friend...
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    I've been cooking and baking with sourdough for more than 20 years, but when it comes to camp bread, I favor the bannock of the Old West and Canada. To make it you just mix flour, baking powder and salt and then add water when you need some. It is doughy but is great for sopping up meat juice and gravy. It can be topped with berries or jam for breakfast or desert. With a few additions it can become more versatile: sugar, milk cornmeal, eggs. It can be fried, baked or roasted on a stick.

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    A lot of good stuff to try out. Thanks very much.

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