View Poll Results: How do I measure a 'successful hunt'

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  • I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I return home safely

    12 17.14%
  • I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I got to observe scenery/nature/animals

    29 41.43%
  • I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I had a chance at harvesting an animal

    16 22.86%
  • I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I kill an animal I was after or a surprise animal

    13 18.57%
  • I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I kill a trophy representative of an animal

    0 0%
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Thread: Measuring 'success'

  1. #1
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Default Measuring 'success'

    I thought this was a great write-up worth sharing...

    LINK

  2. #2
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Thanks, the writer has good insight coupled with the right perspective. That's a success any day.

  3. #3
    Member GDinAK's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing, what agreat attitude those boys are lucky young men...

  4. #4
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Thanks hunt, that was definitely worth sharing,.....Alaskan Kids,...sheeesh, a breed apart

    looks like an interesting website also,
    read an excellent article about Gun Safe Storage Efficiency, in the Guns category
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  5. #5
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    Haven't read it yet, but I consider it a successful hunt when we all make it home, preferably without a stop at the hospital on the way home.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Abel View Post
    Haven't read it yet, but I consider it a successful hunt when we all make it home, preferably without a stop at the hospital on the way home.
    ....... Some time outdoors with family or friends and some great memories/photos, insure success.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  7. #7
    Member PacWestFishTaxidermy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    Thanks, the writer has good insight coupled with the right perspective. That's a success any day.
    This thread is interesting to me. I really became interested when I read your "right perspective" remark. I think we all would agree that teaching kids means everything should be considered as a "success" when hunting. Safety, nature, etc. However, if applied to adults, I think it is sort of judgmental to define what perspective is the "right" one to have.

    If someone considers just returning safely is a success, then a camping trip can fill that need. Or, if someone thinks that just observing nature and scenery is a success, then a hiking trip can fill that need. However, some people spend a lot of time and money setting the goal of killing an animal and I don't see why there should be a stigma attached to them if they feel like their hunting trip was unsuccessful. I support all levels of hunters and even the greedy obsessed trophyaholic who feels suicidal if he does not kill a trophy (my cousin.)

    I would love to know what other hunters feel and think about this. I was going to do a poll, but I don't have that privilege yet. Here are my proposed questions:
    I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I return home safely
    I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I got to observe scenery/nature/animals
    I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I had a chance at harvesting an animal
    I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I kill an animal I was after or a surprise animal
    I mostly feel a hunting trip is a success if I kill a trophy representative of an animal

  8. #8
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Taken care of, PacWest...

  9. #9
    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PacWestFishTaxidermy View Post
    If someone considers just returning safely is a success, then a camping trip can fill that need. Or, if someone thinks that just observing nature and scenery is a success, then a hiking trip can fill that need. However, some people spend a lot of time and money setting the goal of killing an animal and I don't see why there should be a stigma attached to them if they feel like their hunting trip was unsuccessful. I support all levels of hunters and even the greedy obsessed trophyaholic who feels suicidal if he does not kill a trophy (my cousin.
    When I go hunting its successful if I harvest the animal I'm after. do I have fun when I don't shoot something? yes. do I hunt just to shoot an animal? No.but the goal of every hunt is to shoot an animal so therefore a successful trip is defined by weather or not I achieve my goal.

    hunting is about harvesting an animal(s). people enjoy the journey toward the harvest, very much so, that's why we hunt and don't just go to the supermarket.

  10. #10
    Member PacWestFishTaxidermy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    Taken care of, PacWest...
    Awesome. Thanks. This topic really interests me.

  11. #11
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Once and a while, it's easy to say that just getting out, or just seeing an animal makes it a successful hunt...however, after two, three, four (or many more) trips of just getting out or merely seeing a couple animals, it gets a lot harder to call it a successful trip. Been there way more times than I care to try and remember. No different than fishing...if I fish an entire season, and never catch a fish, I have a real hard time saying I was successful.

  12. #12
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I mostly view a trip as a success if I find my target specie(s) and see some decent critters. I endeavor to kill one, but once I have an animal in the crosshairs or start a stalk I'm not hunting anything anymore....I've already found it. Bringing one to bag is a bit tougher and sometimes I just don't drop the hammer for whatever reason I have. I passed on one this weekend because the pack out would have just been a crippler- the nicest caribou I've seen this year.

    I've been on hunts that I didn't enjoy or considered successful, even though I bagged a critter. I've had a great hunt and considered it a success without any sort of harvest at all.

    Some of my best trips are when my companions- usually new guys I'm helping out or my son gets to bag something.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  13. #13
    Member blasterak's Avatar
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    Just being out in nature, with family and friends and enjoying the outdoors is a success to me. Of course it adds to the success if you actually get to see some animals, particularly the targeted species. For example the other day when moose hunting we happened upon a cow moose, munching away about 30 yards below us in a ravine. She didn't see us or hear us, even though she wasn't a legal sex it was still enjoyable to watch with her being so close and undetected. Getting an animal down is the topping though, and also means WORK starts than, especially if were talking a big moose.

  14. #14
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I selected option #2 above, but I find that it's highly dependent on the trip. As an example, on my trip on the Denali Highway back in August, success was tied to harvesting an animal more than usual. The primary goal was getting my friend on a caribou, but once that was done, I'll admit that I felt a bit more pressure to harvest one myself than I usually do. Getting a caribou early was going to free up time to hunt goats with my wife, so coming home without one would have been unsuccessful...at least to a degree. On our sheep hunt in the Brooks, though, we felt totally successful coming home without. Yes, we would have loved to bring home a ram or two, but what we really wanted was solitude. We didn't so much as hear the distant buzz of an airplane for a week, nor did we see a single sign of the presence of man other than the rudimentary landing strip. We covered countless miles and feet of elevation and got to spend a week with just each other. That was success. Yesterday I went out looking for moose, and while I didn't see a single animal larger than a grouse, I discovered a new (to me) trail system that I think has a lot of potential for the future. I'll almost certainly hunt that area again and may go back there in a couple of weeks to trap a couple of beavers. Discovering something potential for the future is another way that I define success. Again, it depends on the trip.

  15. #15
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    This thread reminds me a piece in a Cooper book...a man returns from a long day in the field empty handed and a neighbor asks, "No Luck?"

    The hunter replies, "No, Much Luck- I was hunting all day!"
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  16. #16
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Kyle, really enjoyed Lori's writeup and pics of their hunt. Always love to see families out hunting together, bringing the next generation into the fold.

    And while I certainly agree that for the vast majority of hunters, any time spent afield, alone or with friends and family, is a "success" even if no animal was harvested, in our case living so remote and still in the process of looking for a moose for our larder (we are heading out again this afternoon), if we don't end up catching a moose, we're basically screwed. Which is why I voted for the 2nd to last option.




  17. #17
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    I wanted to vote multiple options....
    The measure of success does vary.
    I just took two successful trips back to back (two weeks total time sheep and caribou ) and never put the cross hairs of my scope on an animal. The freezer is rather empty yet I am happy and more experienced...plan on posting a bit about this later.

    On the sheep hunt I shared my friend's twelve year old son's first back country hunt and the caribou hunt was a horseback ride into the back country and a solo hunt.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by PacWestFishTaxidermy View Post
    If someone considers just returning safely is a success, then a camping trip can fill that need. Or, if someone thinks that just observing nature and scenery is a success, then a hiking trip can fill that need. However, some people spend a lot of time and money setting the goal of killing an animal and I don't see why there should be a stigma attached to them if they feel like their hunting trip was unsuccessful. I support all levels of hunters and even the greedy obsessed trophyaholic who feels suicidal if he does not kill a trophy (my cousin.)
    I think that hunting adds another dimension to a camping or hiking trip that either of them alone cannot match. Even when hunting is done casually, the tag in the hunters pocket offers him a chance to harvest an animal should the opportunity present itself. For me, that possibility is exciting. That being said, I have no problem with people who spend a lot of time and/or money to harvest a trophy animal. Each hunter should pursue success as he or she sees it.
    That being said, I thought the write up was great and it was good to see a family out spending time together outdoors. In our society today, maybe just spending time together as a family with no electronic devices is a success..........

  19. #19
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    I live the lifestyle I do because I thoroughly enjoy being in wilderness observing and experiencing the many wonders of nature, and I spend as much time as possible away from roads and other evidence of negative human impact. But 'success' is by definition measured against a specific goal. The poll question is framed in the context of a hunting trip, and inherent to a hunting trip is, by definition, a certain specific goal. Thus, success is measured by whether or not that goal is achieved; a hunting trip is not a success unless I come home with the animal I was after.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    I live the lifestyle I do because I thoroughly enjoy being in wilderness observing and experiencing the many wonders of nature, and I spend as much time as possible away from roads and other evidence of negative human impact. But 'success' is by definition measured against a specific goal. The poll question is framed in the context of a hunting trip, and inherent to a hunting trip is, by definition, a certain specific goal. Thus, success is measured by whether or not that goal is achieved; a hunting trip is not a success unless I come home with the animal I was after.
    I agree with that.

    While I'm not that "success oriented" in hunting, success is success.

    I enjoy trying, if there is a chance, for success, but success makes it much more so.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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