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Thread: dispatching of birds

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    Default dispatching of birds

    I was out at the hay flats last night to do some jump shooting and then decided to throw out my baby mojo. After i finished around shooting hours i ran in a guy who had a shoveler in his hand he was holding by the feet. The first thing i noticed was the bird was still alive. I said that to him and he replied to me. oh i am just waiting to find dry ground so i can process the bird. I told the guy it is illegal to process game birds in the field. We still had about 3/4 of a mile to walk and i offered to him one last time to dispatch the bird myself and he didn't care enough to do it. Why would anyone in their right mind carry an animal they just shot around while it is still alive and not dispatch the critter?

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Simplist answer: because they are of low moral character.

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    Brings up a good subject to discuss... not individuals of low moral character, but rather the methods waterfowlers use to dispatch birds in the quickest, most humane manner. I know, I know, kill 'em stone dead with steel, or wring their neck is what y'all will say... When wringing necks I have sometimes ripped the head clean off, which I supremely dislike, and other times, I am hesitant to wring necks as the birds are in beautiful plumage and I don't want to muss them up. As for killing birds stone dead... I try my best and we will leave it at that. I have tried just putting pressure on their diaphram and depriving them of O2 but I dont''t like snuffing things out with my hands... call me a pansy, what can I say. I have a stringer that is made of nooses and I will cinch this tight around the dying birds neck and this has worked the best for me. Anyone else have other ideas?

    dodger
    “The perils of duck hunting are great - especially for the duck.” Walter Cronkite

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    Quote Originally Posted by akdodger View Post
    Brings up a good subject to discuss... not individuals of low moral character, but rather the methods waterfowlers use to dispatch birds in the quickest, most humane manner. I know, I know, kill 'em stone dead with steel, or wring their neck is what y'all will say... When wringing necks I have sometimes ripped the head clean off, which I supremely dislike, and other times, I am hesitant to wring necks as the birds are in beautiful plumage and I don't want to muss them up. As for killing birds stone dead... I try my best and we will leave it at that. I have tried just putting pressure on their diaphram and depriving them of O2 but I dont''t like snuffing things out with my hands... call me a pansy, what can I say. I have a stringer that is made of nooses and I will cinch this tight around the dying birds neck and this has worked the best for me. Anyone else have other ideas?

    dodger
    I don't know of a better way either, but I thought i'd let you know your not alone, killing something with my hands is not something I enjoy. I do it so the animal doesn't suffer but I definately don't enjoy it.

    I enjoy the hunt and I enjoy the reward...

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    Good points gents..have seen this many times myself. I usually just grab them by the body and slam their head against my gunstock, or the side of the boat. Think this does it about as fast as it can be done.

    Not sure why someone would walk around with a live bird..makes no sense to me either. Some are disconnected from the ethics surrounding dispatching animals as quickly and humanly as possible.
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    Member akdodger's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Duckhunter01 "Some are disconnected from the ethics surrounding dispatching animals as quickly and humanly as possible.[/QUOTE]

    I think also that the longer an animal suffers, the worse the meat tastes.

    dodger
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    I do the same thing Duckhunter01 does, smacking the heads against the stock is lights out immediately. I saw another method by Warren Coco where he takes a wing feather and sticks it in back of the head. It killed the bird instantly as well. I had to squeeze the life out of the drake oldsquaw I was going to have mounted a couple years ago. Feeling it fight for air tore me apart and I ended up losing sleep over it. I will never, ever do it that way again. If am getting something mounted, I am going to try Coco's technique. I guess I am a giant pansy as well.

    As to why somebody would walk around with a bird still alive after being shot, I would say it's because he is an @**hole. As a hunter we have a responsibility to ensure the animals we take do not suffer, or if they do we end their suffering as quickly and humanely as possible within legal means.

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    I also bite the heads...love the crunch
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    Member akdodger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckhunter01 View Post
    I also bite the heads...love the crunch


    I was waiting for that...
    “The perils of duck hunting are great - especially for the duck.” Walter Cronkite

  10. #10

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    I used to carry a small piece of bailing wire or a nail in my wader pouch and would puncture the skull with it.. lately I have been wringing necks though.

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    I watched Phil Roberson biting heads, The only thing that gets me on that is all the lice that ducks carry. I don't want that in my mouth. You should see me when I am confronted with a spider! The 1911 almost comes out of the holster so I can blast it off the wall in my house!
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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    Im not sucking them...simple quick crunch is all...LMAO If I did feel one crawling around in there..would be a protein snack.


    Show ya next year
    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    I watched Phil Roberson biting heads, The only thing that gets me on that is all the lice that ducks carry. I don't want that in my mouth. You should see me when I am confronted with a spider! The 1911 almost comes out of the holster so I can blast it off the wall in my house!
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    x2 on duckhunter01 and duckslayer56 method. I just smack their head on gunstock or anything else that is hard, used to hunt from wood blinds so that was most often used.

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    My dad was a farmer, so I wring necks as he taught me. It can be easy to put a little too much energy into it and wind up with a headless mess, which is unpleasant for several reasons. Ducks are trickier than, say, ptarmigan, because their necks are a little thicker, so it's tough to find the right balance. I feel that this is one of the best and quickest methods of dispatching though. I honestly think I can be a little too clumsy for the blunt head trauma method. I'd hate to botch that up and have the bird suffer even more. For any who have never wrung necks, or any who want to share tips, here's the basic procedure I use:
    1) Grab the bird between your thumb and index finger, right behind and at the base of the head.
    2) Get the bird swinging around your hand in a circular motion - but NOT TOO FAST.
    3) As the force of the swinging and slight twisting grows, pinch down a little with your grip. Increase spin bit by bit.
    4) Your finger and thumb should find a widening gap between vertebrae. Gently "help" the joint separate by pinching. Stop swinging. The bird is now dead.

    BTW, in step 2 above, you will know INSTANTLY if you get it swinging too fast. Trust. You may end up swinging a bird quite a few times before getting it right, but that's really not a problem, and eventually you will get the right amount of swing dialed in and just have to swing it a couple times to get it done.

    One of my dad's hunting buddies had a slick little device called (I think) a Dispatcher. It was a handled thing like a pair of scissors or pliers. It had two blades that never touched. In the closed position, the blades would be separated with about a 1/4" - 3/8" gap. So he would squeeze the Dispatcher on the bird's neck. It would sever the spine without breaking the skin, quick, easy, and humane. Anyway, may be worth looking into if you keep striking out with the neck-wringing.

    Now birds are one thing; rabbits are another. I usually put a finishing round into a rabbit's head before picking it up. The only two times I ever picked up wounded hares, they whined/cried this horrible, gut-wrenching wail. Talk about tearing out your heart and losing sleep. It was a haunting sound. So I don't mess around with them if it looks like they still have life in them. I get close and put a finishing shot in the head. -Gr
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    Member AK375HH's Avatar
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    Default dispatching of birds

    Gun stock head smack, or molars to the head...one of the two.
    It's not skybusting if you fold em'.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I remember the first time I heard a rabbit do that. It sounded like a human baby, and really freaked me out! I do the same thing you do now, put another in the head if it looks like it's alive.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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    grab the rabbit by the rear legs..while hanging, karate chop him at the base of the skull...breaks the neck every time. I raised the NZ rabbits for years growing up..was the quickest way to dispatch them..even works on the ones in Alaska..lol

    If it does not break his neck...try again harder.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Butt stroke to the head series, move!

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    i crush their skulls with my teeth....makes me feel one with the birds.
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  20. #20

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    A very quick twisting and yanking motion while holding the bird by the head does the job fast and ends the birds suffering. Nothing I hate more than to see an animal suffering. Especially if I am the one who caused it. We owe it to the game we hunt to dispatch it quickly and as painlessly as possible.

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