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Thread: Sausage Recipes vs. 'Spicing Packets'

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    Default Sausage Recipes vs. 'Spicing Packets'

    It's been many years since I routinely used store-bought cake mixes, biscuit mixes, pancake mixes, or other items that implicitly preclude persons approaching and fine-tuning their cooking and smoking from a more personal and artistic perspective.

    It is in that vein that I've also avoided the spicing packets sold en masse by a wide variety of outlets for persons to "make their own sausage at home."

    Between that, and the often-mediocre results of taking meat to processors to have made into sausage; mistakes in processing that lead to a near-total waste of good meat, insufficient spicing, incorrect spicing, bristley attitudes, lack of communication or returned phone callls, and more, have, on a number of occasions, led me to attempt to feret out good sources for sausaging recipes.

    I'm a decent cook, but an admitted novice at sausaging. I love old-style hard-smoked, dry, and fermented European sausages. Landjaeger, hard salamis, and I go WAY back.

    It was with this frame of mind and past experiences that I went 'mining' on the internet to see if I could uncover recipes for the types of sausages I like.

    At the link below, you may well find something of interest. There's many recipes to choose from. I can't personally vouch for the end product in any of them, but the offerings are impressive, and it comes from the combined efforts of customers at a butcher supply place in British Columbia. I'm pretty sure they speak fluent moose in B.C., too.

    Let me/others know if you try any of these, and any input as to modifications, etc., that worked for you.

    http://estores.wws5.com/stuffers.com...s/sausrecp.pdf

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    way cool thanks for the link Ruffle... i use a variety of books also, the hardest part is converting 1 lb recipes to 30 lb recipes.. as when you get that high in bulk... the necessary quantity often changes
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    You're welcome, Vince.

    Most of the recipes I'm familiar with require 20 lbs. of meat, 'X' amount of suet, etc. Most finish in the 18-26 lb. range. I'll spend some time looking through the recipes I scanned last night at the link I posted; many opf them seemed to be in the size range I'm interested in, though I noted at least one recipe that was in the 100 lb. class, if I recall correctly.

    I figure if I'm going to do 4-6 different types of sausage, then ~25 lbs. of each, finished weight, is about right for our desires.

    I'd like to locate a used, good condition, fairly large, commercial-grade meat mixer, grinder, etc. I have friends/acquaintances who do some sausaging and grinding on a commercial basis, and I know that some times shops will sell decent condition equipment when they're either changing the size of their operation, or just wanting to update their 'toys.'

    Hopefully one of them will encounter the equipment I'd like to have, and, ideally, their finding of said equipment will coincide with a time that I have cash in my pocket.

    Of course, that will, no doubt, lead to the conundrum of "where to put the sausaging equipment?", and, ultimately, "I guess we'll need to build a sausaging and meat-processing shed." ..... All of which will, again, rely on timing and cash.

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    keep up the searches on Craig's list... frequent searches yielded me the HOBART mixer for a song.. 200.00 bucks for a mixer worth a few grand. found my LEM #32 1 hp grinder on sale 50% off.. due to the dealer closing the line in his shop... I also caught a sale on the stuffer... while at times i wish i had a larger one.. the 5 lb one requires filling about as often as i have to put a new casing on the horn... so its a break all the time anyway and all the horns are the same leangth anyway...

    i was gifted an 8foot stainless countertop the other day.. just because i shared some sausage with someone...

    I would love to find a good deal on a meat bad saw one day... Deals are out there... for every few of us making our own... there is one or two who have out grown it or family grew up and moved away and the need is not there anymore...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    I spoke a fair bit with a long-time butcher friend who's done my family's meat for over 20 years. One of the first things he said was to try and disuade me from the venture altogether, stating that the cost of GOOD equipment typically outweighs the benefits. The primary issue I saw therein was to wonder how many more years I'll be capable of packing, handling, or hauling moose meat.

    That said, he steered me toward the older single-phase 210-240 volt Hobart grinders, etc.

    I did some searches, and, of course, most of the 'deals' are those that spring up moment-to-moment, and are typically gone as fast as they appeared.... Or faster.

    I found some outlets just trying to peddle their wares, and others who were seemingly more conscientious, trying to only sell those items with long service life, good warranties/manufacturers standing behind their products, and which are accurately rated for horse-power and output, performing in more realistic manners per the manufacturers' claims.

    Ideally I want a mixer that will handle up to 50 lbs. of meat at a time, and a #32 table-top, heavy-duty grinder of the general type referred to earlier. (210-240 volt, single-phase) (If you see or hear of anyone giving this stuff away, please refer them to this thread! ;^>) ).

    The other thing he mentioned is his preference for electric smokers, primarily for the purpose of more accurately regulating heat. My alder-fired wood-stove-heated, walk-in smoker gets the job done with/for my fish, but it probably isn't safe to run at 150 to 160 f. for extended periods without noticing the neighbors that they might want to keep a bug-out bag packed in case they need to evac the neighborhood for an unexpected forest fire.

    Stuffers appear plentiful and reasonably-priced, especially in contrast to some of the other equipment.

    Looks like my shed may get finished sooner than I thought, or that 220 volt circuit in the basement that was going to be dedicated to a larger kiln for my wife, years ago, may find a new mission.

    Band saws are nice, but I think I'll be lucky just to get the other basics. I'll likely stop into a local butcher supply place in Anchorage the next time I'm down that way, and inquire re. equipment similar to what I'm seeking.

    But between the blandly-spiced processors' sausages, outrageous prices approaching the cost of fresh sausages from the retail store (but using MY meat), the sometimes-bristley attitudes, not always getting my own meat back, and all the rest of it, I figure that if I can find deals on the equipment in question, it'll pay for itself in the first 4-5 years... And I'll have a new hobby to work toward perfecting.. if I can manage to still be packing moose meat in 4-5 years.

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    Even a little LEM #8 will do 240# per hour. We trim a carcass and grind at the same time. I've never been able to outrun my kids running this small grinder. Sure, those big 220V grinders are nice, but at what cost?
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Even a little LEM #8 will do 240# per hour. We trim a carcass and grind at the same time. I've never been able to outrun my kids running this small grinder. Sure, those big 220V grinders are nice, but at what cost?
    Precisely why I'm now looking at single-phase (no expensive two-phase or three-phase converter, having spoken with my local electrician), and one which is strictly located in the 'used but refurbed' department, due to being able to pick up a very good grinder for a WHOLE LOT LESS than the new price.

    For the right equipment, I'd consider the whole shebang in used-but-excellent-and-well-maintained shape, and probably save a couple thousand dollars in the end, when contrasted to the price of new equipment..

    The difficulty lies in the fact that the new ones are readily accessible, on the show-room floors of most butcher supply outlets, whereas the used ones that are closer to my price range are laying low, adorned in metaphorical camoflage.. But I'll keep on searching. Stranger things have been found before, so, with time, I hope I'll be successful..

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    my lem #32 is 120.. and flat out does its little brothers
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    my lem #32 is 120.. and flat out does its little brothers
    What was new price, and what was sale price? (...if you don't mind the intrusiveness of the question...)

    My butcher friend preferred the 210 to 240 volt range of grinders for purposes of power. Folks at his shop have frequently used frozen suet cut into strips with a band saw and fed straight into the grinder when none had been thawed.

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    There are some meat equipment on alaskaslist under tools and equipment. There is a meat slicer, meat grinder and also a meat bandsaw.

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    the grinder MIGHT be a deal.. the others are not.. i can buy a new meat band saw for 600-800 bucks

    grinder needs to be looked at but if the 1-2 HP is accurate they are VERY hard to burn out
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    There are some meat equipment on alaskaslist under tools and equipment. There is a meat slicer, meat grinder and also a meat bandsaw.

    Thanks.

    No mention of brand/manufacturer, or whether or not the item is 110 or 220, etc., but who knows? I linked it to my favorites for easy retrieval tomorrow. Perhaps I'll give the seller a call tomorrow morning and see what it is that they have.

    Thanks again.

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    I called the fellow with the grinder; nice old gent. Not sure who talks more or has more stories. He's got nearly 30 years on me, but we were in stiff competition for helpful hints and tales of our time in Alaska. He used to rent horses for hunting from the now-deceased father of a long-time friend of mine from south of where I live now. Small world.... again..

    Turns out he used to live up above me, on a ridge near here as well. I've been by his old house a hundred times.

    Anyway, he's down near Big Lake now, the grinder's a 110/120 volt, heavy-duty, not a Hobart, but reported to have interchangable parts with the Hobart, and sounds as though I'll keep in touch with him. If it doesn't sell soon, then on my next trip down that way (a month or so, give or take?), I'll probably look into acquiring an older heavy-duty grinder.

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