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Thread: Looking to relocate to alaska and have couple questions and would like some advice.

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    Default Looking to relocate to alaska and have couple questions and would like some advice.

    I am new here to the forum and already have learned alot

    I am looking to relocate in the near future sooner the better. I was thinking Fairbanks originally but now I'm not sure. I have been to Juneau before I have a cousin that lives there he is a deckhand in sitka. I would be looking for work where ever I go. I am not afraid of no hard work. I have worked in disaster recovery for the past 4 years always on call no problem. I am use to the cold weather... honestly I look forward to the -40 I have taken plenty of snow mobile trips to the U.P. in Michigan. I really enjoy fishing things of that nature. cottage living

    I would like advice from you guys on what would be smart to do. I am 22 years old I have a 5 year old son. (I will be coming alone. get on my feet then get him and his mother out there as well.)

    I do not drink alcohol and can pass a drug test 365 days a year. From what I have talked to some people on other forums that is big in Alaska. alot of alcoholics. I put in to get my passport so I can drive. I have a new set of tires waiting to be put on when I start my drive. also a brand new spare tire. I have plenty of tools I will be bringing as well so I'm not worried. new battery etc. I have plenty of carhartts 2 bibs a set of coveralls 3 coats haha just what i have got over the past 4 winters.

    I would really like to get an oilfield job or a deckhand job. I am willing to do whatever it takes. I prefer to work long hours 6-7 days a week because that's where the money is at

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    Member Derby06's Avatar
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    Boy your story is so so simliliar to ol TomD's...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...e-Summer/page2

    Quote Originally Posted by michaels813 View Post
    From what I have talked to some people on other forums that is big in Alaska. alot of alcoholics.
    Why would you ask for advice from a bunck of alcoholics....

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    I find a job I dont care who I work for as long as I get paid. That is what im there for work. no more no less not to bring my home life to work and drama this drama that. But thats what I have heard is alcoholics not saying it is true. Believe nothing you hear and only half of what you see... I think that is how the saying goes.. Sounds to me like TomD couldnt take order and didnt like someone yelling at him on a boat... I dont mind. I would be there to learn and work. I didnt read his whole page. my ears are smoking after reading about half of it. haha I dont think ive read that much since high school.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Think of Anchorage as Detroit and Fairbanks as Flint.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Think of Anchorage as Detroit and Fairbanks as Flint.
    Lots of black people? lol

    Ive lived in Detroit never Flint though. There are decent jobs in the Detroit area so are you saying Anchorage has jobs? lol
    I don't want to live in a huge populated area, but if that is where the jobs are I will go there.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Anchorage is where the majority of the state lives, thus it has the majority of the jobs. That being said, there is plenty of work to be had in more rural areas, such as oil work or fishing work as you note. As for oil field work, I haven't worked in that field, but my friends who do have great jobs because they took the time to get some basic training first. I don't know if you'd be able to pull it off, but there are some certifications to be had at schools like the Kenai Community College (not sure if that's the right name) that will get you into a much better job from the outset. Of course, you could start low on the totem pole and try to work your way up from the inside, but in almost every field, more training is going to be more than worth it in the long run.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Anchorage is where the majority of the state lives, thus it has the majority of the jobs. That being said, there is plenty of work to be had in more rural areas, such as oil work or fishing work as you note. As for oil field work, I haven't worked in that field, but my friends who do have great jobs because they took the time to get some basic training first. I don't know if you'd be able to pull it off, but there are some certifications to be had at schools like the Kenai Community College (not sure if that's the right name) that will get you into a much better job from the outset. Of course, you could start low on the totem pole and try to work your way up from the inside, but in almost every field, more training is going to be more than worth it in the long run.
    Would you happen to know where the oil jobs are.. like what region? Also do they work through the winter? I am not here to ask for any hand outs or refferels. I took my placement test for exxon mobil and passed and I set my location to alaska washington state. I have no problem going where the work is.

    I appreciate your guys responses!!

    Thanks

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    Most oil jobs are on the North Slope, which is the term used for the very top of Alaska. Workers live all over the state and some come up from other states, as most jobs are either 2 weeks on and 2 weeks off or 3 on/3off - though some schedules vary. There is also some oil work in Cook Inlet out of Kenai/Nikiski, but that is much smaller scale. The major oil companies that work the Slope are BP, Exxon, and Conoco Phillips, but there are lost of other oil contractor companies and smaller oil exploration companies. And yes, they work year-round - in temperatures that sometimes can drop to nearly 80 below zero.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Most oil jobs are on the North Slope, which is the term used for the very top of Alaska. Workers live all over the state and some come up from other states, as most jobs are either 2 weeks on and 2 weeks off or 3 on/3off - though some schedules vary. There is also some oil work in Cook Inlet out of Kenai/Nikiski, but that is much smaller scale. The major oil companies that work the Slope are BP, Exxon, and Conoco Phillips, but there are lost of other oil contractor companies and smaller oil exploration companies. And yes, they work year-round - in temperatures that sometimes can drop to nearly 80 below zero.

    awesome man thanks!! I am going to research them on the internet alot see what I can come up with. I do know BP, Conoco Phillips you have to take there test and the session is only a few times a year so I would be looking for a small outfit looking for a newbie. Cool I want to work all year around for sure I have worked outside in very cold weather but -80 is a little cold haha although if it pays well I am more than willing to give it all I have for a chance to prove myself. My uncle works at a silver mine, I am going to be giving him a call see what he has to say about it all as well.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    While the temperatures on the slope do occasionally dip to extreme low temps, there are restrictions on what work is performed as the temps drop as well as mandatory breaks in extreme cold temps. Steel gets brittle in extreme cold and when the temps drop below -30 many construction activities are curtailed, and further curtailed at colder temps. Also alot of work is done inside in heated buildings.

    It can be very tough to break into slope jobs, most people who get slope jobs have both specific skills, and know someone who works for an oilfield service company. Not to discourage you, but the reality is not everyone who moves up here instantly gets hired unless they are highly skilled with skills that are in demand.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    If you are looking for work in the oil patch, but don't have any experience yet, I'd go to North Dakota first. You would probably have an easier time getting hired and less money lost if you don't. If you get some experience there and still want to come to Alaska, you'd have an easier time getting a job on the North Slope. You might even find AK connections in ND as some of the contractors have sent some of their workers down there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    While the temperatures on the slope do occasionally dip to extreme low temps, there are restrictions on what work is performed as the temps drop as well as mandatory breaks in extreme cold temps. Steel gets brittle in extreme cold and when the temps drop below -30 many construction activities are curtailed, and further curtailed at colder temps. Also alot of work is done inside in heated buildings.

    It can be very tough to break into slope jobs, most people who get slope jobs have both specific skills, and know someone who works for an oilfield service company. Not to discourage you, but the reality is not everyone who moves up here instantly gets hired unless they are highly skilled with skills that are in demand.
    No discouragement here, Im thankful for the advice!! I understand that. I want to do as much as I can before I actually get there. I have thought about the whole ND also I have been calling on jobs there as well so I can gain my experience, and go from there. I really like alaska but if it comes down to I will go where the work/money is at.

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    One bit of advice on NODAK, you need to figure out what the lodging is before you drive out. Most guys are living in a camper during their work time then, they have to bring the camper out of the oilfield as someone else needs the parking spot.

    Dickinson North Dakota is one of the big places.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Waidmannsheil View Post
    One bit of advice on NODAK, you need to figure out what the lodging is before you drive out. Most guys are living in a camper during their work time then, they have to bring the camper out of the oilfield as someone else needs the parking spot.

    Dickinson North Dakota is one of the big places.
    I have a truck camper, I was going to sell before I moved to alaska. If I end up in ND I will take it with me there. Ive called a few places in ND and they said come out and you have a highly chance of getting a job with in a few days. This might be my best option for the moment save as much money as i can then look into alaska at another time or anywhere for that matter.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I was going to mention to go to No Dak to get oilfield experience and to make some money before heading to Alaska. Having a couple of years experience and the skills gained will dramatically improve your ability to get a job up here. You might even end up working for a company that is doing work in Alaska and transferring within a company can be a plus. Then again it can also be a handicap if the location you're working at doesn't want to let you go.

    The days of just showing up in Alaska without a skillset and experience and being able to find a job are pretty much gone. We've already had an influx this past couple years of new people from the lower 48 with skills and experience due to the economy in the lower 48 doing poorly.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Just an update:

    I just traded my truck camper and purchased a 26' travel trailer and am heading to ND on the 29th. already reserved a spot in an indoor rvpark so winter will be on my side rather than being outside.

    Alaska I hope to see you in the next couple years!!

    Thanks for everyones help and advice on here. I still get alot of useful info on here...


    Thanks again.
    Michael

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    I live in Dickinson North Dakota. I think i am qualified to answer any questions ya might have. =)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dropy View Post
    I live in Dickinson North Dakota. I think i am qualified to answer any questions ya might have. =)
    Wow, Thanks!!

    Jobs still around like a wile ago? I see alot online require a cdl... I wouldnt mind getting one, I just dont have time and money at the moment I need to get working aagin.

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    PLENTY of jobs up here paying well. Even wal mart starts ya off at 13.00$ ++ an hour. I know because i interviewed with em on wednsday. =)

    You dont need a cdl to get a good job, ya just need one to get a good driving job.

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    Here's my two cents...

    We left Minot, ND in 2011 and moved to Fairbanks.... Been here over a year now. Even though my wife and I are both employed and make real good money up here, I am not sure that I would recommend anyone move up this way unless they had something nailed down that payed way good compaired to lower 48 standards. Home heating oil and electricity will drain bank accounts.... At -40 it doesn't take long to burn through $1K a month.... Anyway, the moral of my story, to cut through the chase, is that we just bought 80 acres in N.Michigan with a 2300 sq ft home (built in 2003) and 3 barns for less than what the house we live in on one acres costs here.... Best of luck to you...

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