Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: recomendations for hunting/trapping snowmachine

  1. #1

    Default recomendations for hunting/trapping snowmachine

    What's your opinion of the best all around sled for hunting/trapping, I don't really care about speed as much as I will use this for mainly pulling a sled full of gear, supplies , or game, was leaning towards a skidoo but will consider other brands if you can sway my opinion, thanks any help will be greatly appreciated, easy of maintanance & servicing is also a deciding factor.

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    New or used?
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  3. #3

    Default

    New machine, I don't wanna buy anyone else's headache, also heard good things bout the yamaha Bravo, I'be only owned 1 snowmachine but it was more of a racing type sled, articat 600 zxr efi studded track & some engine mods, I want a utility type working,hunting, trapping sled not a racing/jumping sled.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    chugiak, ak
    Posts
    630

    Default recomendations for hunting/trapping snowmachine

    Skidoo tundra or skandic I like the wide tracked ones I think they float better. The 600ace motor is good on fuel and is a work horse.

  5. #5

    Default

    Im looking for advice on their ability for load pulling, motor size, reliability 2stroke vs 4 stroke, ease of service, weight of sled & how they handle different snow conditions aprox price of new sled etc ....

  6. #6
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,057

    Default

    Either a Skidoo Tundra (LT, WT, whatever you want) or an AC Bearcat. A Skandic SWT is pretty unstoppable if you've got the depth of pocket to get one- I occasionally use a buddy's and its just fantastic.

    4 stroke will be a little easier on fuel but weigh more, cost more and may not be quite as reliable. Either will pull a good sized sled and neither will perform like a mountain sled in bottomless powder but for hunting and trapping you'll seldom head that high anyway.

    I used a Tundra 300F (discontinued) for a few years and it was a great little woods bomber and frozen river runner.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  7. #7
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    for true little trapper machines, you aren't assuming someone else's head ache with an older tundra, bravo, or bearcat as they don't make em like that anymore. The single carbed 1998-2000 340-440 bearcats would be my top choice. Simple, got a choke, phenomenal on fuel, lot's of low end grunt with the wide ratio work clutching, and fairly light weight.

    My second choice would be the tundra ll with reverse.

  8. #8
    Member Spookum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Square banks
    Posts
    358

    Default

    I had a life changing experence. Two hunting buddies rented an old 90s tundra. I looked at the single carbed, single engine motor and laughed long and hard. I followed that tundra around all day with the two hunting buddies on it. they had NEVER rode a sled before. when the guy in back wanted to see what was infont, he would lean over and the sled (and fold a sled they were pulling with 2 cans of gas and a tent and a chain saw and acooler) would run off the trail and dump one (or bolth of them in the powder). To get it un stuck, you just had to climb back on in chest deep snow, and lean to the up hill side and out it would come, often draggin the other guy under the fold a sled. This was amusing to no end from watching from my 99 RMK. We rode 6 hours solid, and hooked up on a nice, big cow at the end of a the day. The rmk broke (of course) and the tundra had to pull the cow out on the fold a sled, plus two guys while the RMK and i gimped out. I had to fuel up.... twice, and i dont think the tundra burned a full tank of gas. This is my third year of owning a snow machine, and i swear, the next tundra i see i will own!!!!

    I have noticed that there are like skidoo skandic or is it a tundra sled that is suposed to be bolth "utility" and sport mix? I think it is the tundra "extreme" It kind of gets out of the total utilatiarian mode and try to be a bit "sporty". I think this would be the sled i would get. The heart of a worker and the soul of a toy. Lets face it, eventualy your going to have to brake trail. You need every advantage you can get! I think that it is a tundra wiht a bit more agressive of a track, a LITTLE bit less efficnt on the fuel due to a more agrssive track, but at the end of the day when im bone tired, adding another 2 gallons of gas VS getting stuck one more time seems like a no brainer. I will add the gas. Let us know what you come up with!

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    for true little trapper machines, you aren't assuming someone else's head ache with an older tundra, bravo, or bearcat as they don't make em like that anymore. The single carbed 1998-2000 340-440 bearcats would be my top choice. Simple, got a choke, phenomenal on fuel, lot's of low end grunt with the wide ratio work clutching, and fairly light weight.

    My second choice would be the tundra ll with reverse.
    Don't underestimate the andvantage of a simple LIGHT machine. I traded a buddy last year for a early 90's tundra lt and the little machine is amazing. I was riding naval deep powder with my kids and it goes through the deep snow fine so long as you stay on the gas. The few times we were timid and got stuck it was very easy to get unstuck. You pull the nose to the side to get out of the snow that is balled up under the sled, stand on the back of the footrest to get weight on the track for traction and just drive out of the hole. Being in the same situation with a machine that is 50% heavier is not quite as easy!

    New or old, sleds break down and when they do, you want simple. A fan cooled motor is much simpler, they are tuned for less power so run almost forever between rebuilds, and you don't have to worry about them overheating due to not getting enough snow on the cooler.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  10. #10
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,060

    Default

    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/spo/3270304126.html

    If I had the extra cash I would jump all over it. Yes it is pricey for the year but they all hold their value and one with this kind of care and low hours will last many many years.

    or for a new machine cant beat this price. With Alaska mark up you cant get a new base model for under 8500 so thats a very good price for 2012

    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/for/3214914065.html

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    One of the reasons the Tundra type snowmobile makes a good trapping machine is the low gearing you do not spins out in soft snow. What I would do before buying a new sled is change weights in the clutch. It would improve the problem with spinning out and you would have a lot more power than a Tundra.

  12. #12
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    One of the reasons the Tundra type snowmobile makes a good trapping machine is the low gearing you do not spins out in soft snow. What I would do before buying a new sled is change weights in the clutch. It would improve the problem with spinning out and you would have a lot more power than a Tundra.
    It's true. I watched a 700 cc mountain sled throttle down to get moving off trail. Had all his snow, grass n sticks stuck in my helmet and all over my cowling. I think I really did "eat his dust" as I decided to chew on the grasses that got blown in my face. In the same conditions (following him), I feathered the throttle on my Widetrak LX while in low gear, and got moving without all the spinning out.

  13. #13

    Default

    I think I'm going to get 2 sleds, a ski-doo skandic swt 600 e-tec for myself & a yamaha bravo for my son, I believe its a 340, & their doin away with that particular yamaha model but I've located some 2011 left overs, the skandic is a considerable amount of $ over the yamaha but I figure its a good idea to have 2 machines in the event of a breakdown &
    my son can ride along w/me as I thouroughly enjoy his company. Thanks for all the assistance friends.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    143

    Default

    the 600 SWT is a great choice but i would look at a polaris shift 550,136inch track for your son. My wife and mother ride them and they are great.

  15. #15
    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Palmer/Deadhorse
    Posts
    1,030

    Default

    How reliable/dependable are these new electric start 4 strokes? I'm in the same boat, looking for a hunting/trapping sled for this year but want to make sure I buy something that won't (or is less likely, at least) to crap out on me when I'm way out. Like the OP, I'm not looking for speed or mountain climbing ability, just a good workhorse that'll pull a gear sled and crank when I want it to.

    Thanks!

  16. #16
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    The reports I've read is that the electric start 4 strokes are very reliable.

    The concern is that at extreme cold, i.e. South of -40 you have both a battery that contend with, and a crankcase full of oil that will be the consistancy of gear oil. What I've heard of people doing as a contingency for these situations is carrying a small tent and a small wood stove and some charcoal to get things heated up.

    It's the same tecnology as your truck, it's just in the woods there is no bull rail to plug in to keep things toasty when you fire up in the morning.

    I'm partial to kiss technology when in the boonies, and an air cooled pull start two stroke sno go is as simple as it gets in motorized winter transportation.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •