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Thread: Sakrete/Quickrete Mortar/Cement for building with stone/gravel

  1. #1
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    Default Sakrete/Quickrete Mortar/Cement for building with stone/gravel

    I'm thinking about trying my hand at building a small project out of stone for the first time, and I'm hoping some of you guys here have some experience with stone and could give a few starting pointers.

    What I have is a typical outhouse at a recreational campsite (future cabin site) and I would like to build stone steps, or a stone pad, in front of the doorway as well as a short stone wall around the base to seal off gaps between the outhouse floor and the ground and hopefully ward off erosion.

    I remember my grandfather using sakrete or quickrete to pour a shed floor and it was basically lay out a form with 2x4's, mix the bag contents with water in a 5 gal pail using a boat paddle, and mix in some gravel then pour and level with a trowel. I'm not sure if that's the correct procedure or product for what I want to do.

    For the front step/pad, I'm thinking that I can select softball and smaller sized stones and rocks and arrange them into a square, outlined by a 2x4 or 2x6 form (say 2' sq) and then pour in the sakcrete/quickrete and work it into all of the gaps and spaces by hand. For the short wall around the outhouse, I figure I can I dig about a 3" deep by 6" wide trench around the outhouse, close the walls/4x4 beam foundation, and fill it with the sakrete mix, then push stones and gravel into it. Once the trench is filled with rock and mix, I can use the mix like a mortar to add more stones on top to a height of about 8" above ground.

    Will this work? Am I on the right path here or barking up the wrong tree? Is there a better or "proper" way to do this? I want to do it right because, eventually, I would like to build a stone wall and maybe even a traditional stone foundation for a cabin when the time comes.

  2. #2

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    You would simply set forms around where you want your steps, add stones and steel wire mesh, then mix quikcrete and pour to use as mortar between stones. Then take a 2x4 and trowel fairly level, use a wet scrub brush to clean the rocks you put in after the cement starts to dry.
    Quikcrete has small gravel in it, maybe up to 3/8". Mortar doesn't have gravel in it, it also has a lot less strength and wear resistance than quikcrete. use rebar or wire mesh to hold your steps together and in the correct place.
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    Default Re: Sakrete/Quickrete Mortar/Cement for building with stone/gravel

    I built a small path with premix and forms and I can tell you it is a lot of work. Figure on at least 1 hour of hard work for every bag of mix by the time you mix, pour, screed and finish.
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    several ways of doing exposed aggregate ,we would put stones in last and push em down with a mag or bull float then you want to spray with sugar water(they also make chemicals )scrub and expose the tops of the stones.. I will see if I can find you a how to...

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    here you go this one looked good for ya..

    http://www.builderbill-diy-help.com/...aggregate.html

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    Hey thanks for the comments you guys, and the link, Bear. It seems to be mostly as I expected, although I wasn't really planning on using wire or rebar. Is that really necessary? I thought that the large rocks would provide all of the structural requirements in lieu of the metal wire or bar. Am i wrong?

    BTW, one hour of hard work per bag probably works out to FOUR hours for me LOL.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    Hey thanks for the comments you guys, and the link, Bear. It seems to be mostly as I expected, although I wasn't really planning on using wire or rebar. Is that really necessary? I thought that the large rocks would provide all of the structural requirements in lieu of the metal wire or bar. Am i wrong?

    BTW, one hour of hard work per bag probably works out to FOUR hours for me LOL.
    yes I would at the least you should put a 6" square wire in there and you can just cut out where the rocks will go and keep the mesh 2" or so inside the form so it doesn accidentally get exposed and show any rust spots

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    Default Sakrete/Quickrete Mortar/Cement for building with stone/gravel

    Assuming a few dollars isn't an issue, I would go with a simple rebar grid to support the steps, try to get it at least 2" off the bottom of the concrete.

    Rocks will not provide any structure to the steps as a whole and they will probably crack without rebar (or high quality wire grid but I'd use 1/2" rebar it's fairly cheap, you can buy the exact quantity you want, and it's easy to transport.

    You might find a mix of mortar and pea gravel holds up better than just mortar.

  9. #9

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    IF you plan to use this to carry a load or support weight don't use mortar use concrete. Mortar is a little portland cement in a lot of sand as a binder, cement is sand, gravel/rock and a desired amount of portland cement for the working pressure required; it's much stronger. In batch plants it's mixed at sacks of portland cement per yard; 3 sack, 4 sack,5 sack, this is determined by desired strength of the slab or structure. Slump of concrete is the pouring viscosity, it can be very thick and is used to pour retaining walls on slopes. Once concrete is mixed and gets hot it will harden even under water.
    Rebar is available in 1/8" increments, I've never used anything smaller than 3/8" or larger than 1 1/2". Steel in cement helps reduce cracking and seperation of the pieces in case of stress fractures.
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