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Thread: 300 win mag Kimber8400 Montana, issues

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    Member honeybadger's Avatar
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    Default 300 win mag Kimber8400 Montana, issues

    Anyone have any luck improving the accuracy on a magnum caliber Montana through recrowning or modifications? Accuracy is less than desirable considering what I paid for the rifle!

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Mine was very inconsistent. Some nice groups, some opening up. After messing around with the loads to no avail, I checked the barrel for contact with the stock - sure enough it was touching in a few spots within a few inches of the stock tip. I took some sandpaper and a dowel and smoothed it out, opening up the barrel channel so a business card would slide freely until about 4 inches from the receiver.

    That did the trick. It is now shooting consistent 1-1/2 inch 100 yard groups. Search the Shooting forum and you'll see a thread I started on exactly this topic. I'll probably have mine pillar bedded this winter and that should really settle it in. The other thing is the trigger is a little over 4 pounds. That is a little heavy for me in a precision long range gun like a 300 WM. I'm going to have mine adjusted down to 3 pounds.

    I'd leave the crown alone unless yours has some damage.

    Here's the link:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ntana-Accuracy
    Last edited by GD Yankee; 09-12-2012 at 21:49. Reason: more info

  3. #3

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    Wish I could help but I can't. Bought five new Kimbers over the last 10 years or so and four were sold off for the same reasons you mentioned. One I paid to have rechambered and recrowned and it shot exactly like it did before, crappy. Tried glass bedding them as well with no luck. They were simply to inconsistent.
    The one I kept was rebarreled and that fixed it. It is my opinion Kimber use's inferior barrels, some people get lucky and get a good one. I got five bad one's and the last was bought two years ago. And that is the LAST Kimber rifle I will ever buy.

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    Some people with accuracy problems with Kimbers have had success by shortening the barrel.

    One local person keep whacking off and inch at a time until he got a 308 caliber to 16 1/2 inches.
    Now it shoots great.
    NRA Life Member since 1974

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    First, have the crown checked - Recrowning is no big deal and inexpensive - Second, clean it really REALLY good (if you have not already) and if it was NIB for you then follow someone's break in procedure to the letter - Third, are you shooting factory or handloads ? - Fourth, send an email to ann@kimberamerica.com and explain EXACTLY what the perceived "problem" is and ask for their help - If you follow that "cut the barrel off an inch at a time" idiocy you may end up with an even more expensive "handgun" ! - Kimber Montana's had "some" QC issues in the early days but they are largely not there today as Kimber is working diligently to produce a very good rifle for a fair price (IMO) and they don't use "inferior" barrels ..... read up on the new "Forbes production rifle" and learn something interesting - "NEW" barrels are often not lapped all that much which smooths out the machining marks left in button rifled tubes and proper break-in "can" improve that immensly - NECO inc also sells "fire lapping bullet kits" that can arguably help if the particular barrel is rougher than most - I have had and handloaded for ..... 7 Kimber Montana's in various chamberings and the worst I've ended up with is 1 1/2" 4 shot groups with the best ones shooting the first 3 shots into on ragged hole and the 4th making sub 1" - and although I'd definitely prefer an orgiginal Model 70 trigger design, the Kimber triggers are good for an enclosed mechanism, safeties are great, bedding is normally very good - OH, and make sure the action screws are torqued to 65 INCH / lbs too

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    AND ... if this is your first 300 win mag and you are handloading, this a a great cartridge and normally very inherently accurate although the neck is sort of short making the use of good quality dies in very good condition an important issue (as if it were not important for all the rest?)

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    16 1/2" barrelled 300 Win Mag huh ? pretty "nice" .308 ya got there !!

  8. #8

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    I bought a 338 win mag in the same model 6 weeks ago. I chopped the barrel down to 23" to make it stiffer and recrowned it as well as adjusting the trigger to 3lbs. it shoots lights out! i'm very happy with the results. I think lighter rifles are jsut a little more fickle to get to shoot, but if you put in your time, they can do just fine

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    redneck doc, NOW 23" is more like it ! and in a 338 win mag case even better yet ! what bullets are you loading ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by back country View Post
    AND ... if this is your first 300 win mag and you are handloading, this a a great cartridge and normally very inherently accurate although the neck is sort of short making the use of good quality dies in very good condition an important issue (as if it were not important for all the rest?)
    OOOOh Yeah, I would say the neck IS "short", at .264 .

    The 7mm Rem. Mag. is .271 and that's a smaller caliber.

    The 300 WM should be as EASY to load as my 7mm RM. I use an RCBS Neck Sizing Die. I don't even hafta lube the neck. I just brush out the inside of the necks before sizing.

    But, it ain't a beeg chore to put a bit of lube on the neck and some on the inside with a Q tip, and wipe it off after sizing either.

    If that doesn't work for you, you're probably loading them too HOT.

    Smitty of the North
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    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  11. #11

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    back country,

    I'm shooting 225 gr ttsx behind a hot load of RL17. i'm guessing i'm getting 2900 fps+ based on my charge weights, even though i get no pressure signs. I'd recommend honeybadger try the cheapest most obvious things first and then more costly things as needed to get the most accuracy out of his rig. Another thing that is highly underreported is the person behind the gun- how well do they really shoot. Light guns can be harder to shoot not only due to weight, but recoil too. if you add a poor trigger pull to that equation, you can be fighting an uphill battle. my agenda is to outfit the gun exactly how i want (barrel length, crowning, trigger, appropriate load, check bedding, etc.) before i go to the range, so I don't get any preconceived notions after the first range session. You can then proceed accordingly based on what you think is appropriate....

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    redneck doc - you hit that one spot on ! we here have no way to evaluate the ability of the shooter sitting at the bench who is complaining about the gun's accuracy (or lack of) and all too often, even though wisdom through experience has been solicited, the posts are seemingly ignored - this thread is a good example of that ..... it seems that folks don't realize (or forget) that benching a rifle is not necessarily a test of "skill" (although there is plenty of skill involved in benchrest discipline) but a way of wringing out the rifle's potential (am I wrong here ? - it all seems to get jumbled together when I try to talk about it) but to run off and start chopping 6+" of barrel away seems rather, "ambitious" ,shall we say .... when that rifle does not respondas expected .... (but then, I suppose a VERY short barrelled rifle might have been what was wanted in the first place) so shame on me for saying anything !! and I don't think it a slap to one's manhood to slip a vest or shooting pad behind the rifle when testing loads (I sure HOPE it's not !)

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    Quote Originally Posted by back country View Post
    redneck doc - you hit that one spot on ! we here have no way to evaluate the ability of the shooter sitting at the bench who is complaining about the gun's accuracy (or lack of) and all too often, even though wisdom through experience has been solicited, the posts are seemingly ignored - this thread is a good example of that ..... it seems that folks don't realize (or forget) that benching a rifle is not necessarily a test of "skill" (although there is plenty of skill involved in benchrest discipline) but a way of wringing out the rifle's potential (am I wrong here ? - it all seems to get jumbled together when I try to talk about it) but to run off and start chopping 6+" of barrel away seems rather, "ambitious" ,shall we say .... when that rifle does not respondas expected .... (but then, I suppose a VERY short barrelled rifle might have been what was wanted in the first place) so shame on me for saying anything !! and I don't think it a slap to one's manhood to slip a vest or shooting pad behind the rifle when testing loads (I sure HOPE it's not !)
    We shoot from the bench to test the rifle, but yeah, it does require skill to be consistent enough to know how accurate a rifle/load combination is. IME, it takes a LOT of skill.

    I don't think chopping off the barrel is a solution for accuracy, but it could work out that way by chance.

    I'm hearin what RED NECK DOC, said about a "poor trigger pull". I've about decided that ONE rifle I have, I can't shoot consistently because the trigger is not only creepy, but inconsistently creepy. (Sometimes the creep is noticable, and sometimes not.)

    Sometimes it shoots well, and other times not. It's like it's poor shooting, but maybe that's the reason for poor shooting.


    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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