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Thread: Best 375 for Alaska?

  1. #1
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Default Best 375 for Alaska?

    Sako Kodiak, Ruger Alaskan, CZ, what is your favorite or wish list 375 for hunting in Alaska? I love blued steel and wood, but synthetic or laminate stocks are fine. I have a 9.3x62, but I've always wanted a 375. What do people have and what are your preferences. I'm sure the 375 Ruger is great, but it's a little rough compared to the Sako Kodiak.

    My 9.3 is splitting case necks and the chamber seems to be a little large, so the 375 bug is biting...

    Thoughts?

  2. #2

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    Of the rifles listed I like the sako the best. I've never had a bad sako.

    I'm going to kodiak this year with a Blaser R8 in 375. My extra rifle is a Winchester 70 classic stainless 375.

    It really is a personal choice.

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    Some great ones out there for sure.

    I've got a Ruger Alaskan and like it quite a bit...I've bought a couple of used ones pretty cheap. The Sako is fabulous but I could pick up 4 used Rugers for that price!

    Not mentioned is the Kimber Talkeetna- I know 'Kimber' is darn near a dirty word anymore but that's a pretty neat package!

    As much as I love blued and walnut...just can't beat one up that bad.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    I forgot about the Talkeetna. I do like my Kimber 300WM 8400. I like patronizing USA firms, but the Sako is a pretty nice package. The Ruger is a great price, but I just don't care for the "wacky wall walker" Hogue sticky stock and I'd have to put $$ in to replace it.

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    Do you wanna take the prettiest girl to the prom with no money in your pocket or the hard working one with some money left over for the after party? The Ruger is kinda homely but believe it or not that stock works pretty well in the wet and nasty and helps wth the recoil. For me I went with the 416 Ruger Alaskan over the 375 (I like em with a little extra meat on their bones). There is no difference in price as well. It all comes down to personal preferrance I would say.

    Good Luck,
    John
    Life is too important to be taken seriously.

    Chinese proverb

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    Have had a Sako Kodiak in 375 for the last couple of years and love it. Was tempted by the Kimber Talkeetna but in the end couldn't resist the Sako. JC is right - in the end it is all about personal preference.

  7. #7
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I have a Ruger #1 in 375 H&H stainless laminate but the next one will be a Kimber Talkeetna or a Winchester Mod 70 stainless.

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    I have the older Sako full stock carbine with a B&C stock for use when hunting or out and about. The B&C sure saved a bunch of dings and gashes on the wood over the years when it was on my back as my fly fishing buddy. I'm still cleaning gray flour out of the gun after one memorable slide down a river bank.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  9. #9
    Member Double Shovel's Avatar
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    I had the same bug three years ago and decided on the Sako Kodiak - no regrets here. With a 2.5x8 leupold, I find it with me in the field for all but sheep. Like most here, I've got multiple options when I open the gun safe but this rifle gets grabbed first.

    Two caribou and a brown bear later, I've only had one mishap. While moose hunting last year, a strap on my backpack somehow wrapped around the bolt shroud and disassembled the bolt/firing pin/spring in the field! Two minutes of cussing and wrestling it back together had me back in action. Freak deal, maybe? Something to consider, sure.

    I see a used one for sale in eagle river if anyone's interested - I'm not selling mine any time soon.


    http://alaskaslist.com/1/posts/9_General/63_Guns_Hunting/247972_Sako_Kodiak_375.html

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    The CZ is by far the best built gun for the money. Deep magazine, excellent sights, good stock design, long enough barrel, single set trigger, and a receiver that is purpose built for a 375 length cartridge. The "new" 375's don't really do anything better than the old H&H cartridge. The CZ gets my vote for "best".
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    The CZ is by far the best built gun for the money. Deep magazine, excellent sights, good stock design, long enough barrel, single set trigger, and a receiver that is purpose built for a 375 length cartridge. The "new" 375's don't really do anything better than the old H&H cartridge. The CZ gets my vote for "best".
    Agreed, and the .375 Weatherby cartridge is the best. Simply because you can use two (2), different cartridges for the one chamber; H&H or Weatherby, that's convenience. Can't do that with anything else.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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  12. #12

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    Which ever one has the most reliable trigger system and a bolt that is able to be field stripped with out tools. Other then that, a bear won't know the difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    The CZ is by far the best built gun for the money. Deep magazine, excellent sights, good stock design, long enough barrel, single set trigger, and a receiver that is purpose built for a 375 length cartridge. The "new" 375's don't really do anything better than the old H&H cartridge. The CZ gets my vote for "best".
    I have a couple CZ 550 Americans and I love em too but they can get a little heavy at the end of the day. I like to shoot them because the weight does dampen the recoil a fair amount. Maybe I'm just getting soft but the little Sako and my Tikka's are my favorites now because of the weight since I carry them a whole lot more than I shoot them.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    In my humble opinion "best for Alaska..." and blued/wood do not go in the same sentence!

    Having said that I bought a used Interarms Mark X, garuntee I paid the least of all the guns listed so far!

    Turns out it shoots straight too! I can clover leaf barnes Triple Shocks, factory Federal stuff, at 100 yards. Even with rust in a few spots, several scratches from falling down with it AND a plastic stock, can you believe it!

    Comedy aside, its been a great gun for $450 or so, i've seen 2 others since I got mine for close to the same price. Its a mauser CRF action, parkerized, plastic, good tool in the woods. Not pretty, fairly heavy, does have iron sights too.

  15. #15
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Yup, I've been cruising GB looking for a cheap(er) Mark X or a Whitworth. Wood would have to be converted to laminate or sealed with accraglas. If I got a good deal on one, I'd have it Cerakoted, or barring that, Rustoleumed!

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    Last one I saw was at the pawn broker here in town, I swear it was the only gun he had that WASN'T overpriced. I'll check and see if its still there if you want?

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by GD Yankee View Post
    Yup, I've been cruising GB looking for a cheap(er) Mark X or a Whitworth. Wood would have to be converted to laminate or sealed with accraglas. If I got a good deal on one, I'd have it Cerakoted, or barring that, Rustoleumed!
    A Remington 798 would be the same gun as the MK X. As would a Charles Daly for that matter.

    Not a thing wrong with any of them!

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    Good point, there is actualy a 798 here in town in a .458 Win Mag that i've been drooling over for a year or so now. Reasonable price too, somewhere around $800 new I think.

    Once you go big no never go back!

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    Like you, I am partial to blued steel and wood, so instead of the Ruger Alaskan, I opted for the Ruger African. I had the trigger reworked to 2.5 lbs and had the stock bedded and barrel floated. It has dumped three moose in their tracks and I am happy with its performance, weight, recoil and overall feel. For an economy rifle, it was worth having the work done to get the better performance. Out of the box, it shot like crap; trigger heavy and sloppy and grouped like it was throwing rocks. After the work, nice tight trigger and groups at 1" consistently at 100yds. Still kicks pretty good, but not unbearable to shoot a few rounds at the range each season; I wouldn't shoot it every weekend though.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

  20. #20
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Is the recoil pad on that African worth anything? The Alaskan has a pretty spongy one. I'm always amazed at the cheap "recoil" pads that come on factory guns - although the red hard rubber pad on the first gun I ever bought looks great (on my Ruger M77, tang safety 30-06).

    For anyone shooting the Sako Kodiak, how much velocity do you lose over a standard factory load through the usual 24-26 inch barrel guns? I'm pretty sure the Sako has a 21 inch barrel.

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