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Thread: Removing Oiler

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    Member Boone's Avatar
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    Default Removing Oiler

    Just picked up a 2005 Ski-Doo Tundra. Should I remove the oiler and run mix gas?

    Thanks in advance for any input.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Unless you are racing and figure you just have to save that extra weight, I'd say no. Depending on the engine, there are some bearings and gears for the water pumps that will not be oiled with pre-mix and you'll still need a small oil bottle rigged up to keep those items lubed.

    Asside from some older machines, oil pump failure is extremely rare.
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    2005 was the last model year of the old Tundra II design with the air cooled Rotax engine, with the advantage that it incorporated the new electronic reverse which was introduced a few years prior, and had factory hot grips... If you choose to remove the oiler, it's simple and eliminates the small but nonetheless real risk of burning down your engine due to a stripped gear in the oiler. The oiler on the tundra only injects oil to the cylinder for 2-cycle combustion; there are no other gears or bearings oiled by the injection oiler on the Tundra II. No need for any sort of rigged up oil bottle. 50:1 premix with a good quality oil will keep that engine happy forever. Change the crankcase oil annually, and grease the suspension a few times a year... Best snowmachine ever made.
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    Member Boone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    2005 was the last model year of the old Tundra II design with the air cooled Rotax engine, with the advantage that it incorporated the new electronic reverse which was introduced a few years prior, and had factory hot grips... If you choose to remove the oiler, it's simple and eliminates the small but nonetheless real risk of burning down your engine due to a stripped gear in the oiler. The oiler on the tundra only injects oil to the cylinder for 2-cycle combustion; there are no other gears or bearings oiled by the injection oiler on the Tundra II. No need for any sort of rigged up oil bottle. 50:1 premix with a good quality oil will keep that engine happy forever. Change the crankcase oil annually, and grease the suspension a few times a year... Best snowmachine ever made.
    Have any fouling issues after removing your oiler?

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I'm on my 5th Tundra. All had/have the same oiler as yours. No problems. Learn to watch the cable for stranding and adjustment. You can also add a bit of oil to every tank as a backup.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boone View Post
    Have any fouling issues after removing your oiler?
    No. Running 50:1 with good oil, the plug is usually nice and brown, provided jet is set properly for altitude/conditions. It's actually a very forgiving engine. You can screw it up, but you have to work at it.
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    Default Re: Removing Oiler

    You meant "change the chaincase oil annually," right? I have yet to change the crankcase oil on a two-stroke, although I have drained river water.
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grayling Slayer View Post
    You meant "change the chaincase oil annually," right?
    Yes.
    ........
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    I didn't remove my oiler, I simply quit adding oil to the reservoir and started mixing oil with the gas. I had to rebuild my 05 last fall - it gave up pulling a medium load on a -30F day. How many of you using oil pumps know exactly what ratio the auto pump is giving you? I'll bet most don't. I payed close attention to my cable and gears (even carried spares) and thought my oiler was adjusted correctly. ....and I still got burned....and i have run it for several years now - no problems until yhen. I now mix a bit stronger the first run of the season, and when it's super cold. For the most part I think the oilers are reliable if maintained and inspected regularly, but you can eliminate the possibility of that mechanical part failing, by mixing your oil/gas.

    Others have removed or pinched the oil line instead of removing the oiler.

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    you can start with full oil and full gas at the beginning of a ride and then measure how much oil you have to put in and how much gas and figure the ratio and adjust the pump if you need to. i always use my oil pump and put a small amount of oil in every tank it is good for the bottom end bearings.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cabin goer View Post
    you can start with full oil and full gas at the beginning of a ride and then measure how much oil you have to put in and how much gas and figure the ratio and adjust the pump if you need to. i always use my oil pump and put a small amount of oil in every tank it is good for the bottom end bearings.
    Are you sure that would be a good way to figure, since oil pumps on many machines deliver either less or more oil depending on the RPM? I'm not saying you are wrong; just saying it might not be the most accurate gauge unless you ran the machine at a constant RPM all day.

    I've kept my oil injection on every machine I've owned since 1982 and have never had a problem in warm, cold, or with a load.

  12. #12
    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Removing Oiler

    In 20 years the only problem with oil injection I've had is knocking the oil line off one cylinder while changing jets.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by driftak View Post
    I didn't remove my oiler, I simply quit adding oil to the reservoir and started mixing oil with the gas. I had to rebuild my 05 last fall - it gave up pulling a medium load on a -30F day. How many of you using oil pumps know exactly what ratio the auto pump is giving you? I'll bet most don't. I payed close attention to my cable and gears (even carried spares) and thought my oiler was adjusted correctly. ....and I still got burned....and i have run it for several years now - no problems until yhen. I now mix a bit stronger the first run of the season, and when it's super cold. For the most part I think the oilers are reliable if maintained and inspected regularly, but you can eliminate the possibility of that mechanical part failing, by mixing your oil/gas.

    Others have removed or pinched the oil line instead of removing the oiler.

    Are you positive your engine burn down was related to an oiler failure as opposed to running too lean? Most two stroke engine failures are due to the engine being run too lean, not due to lube failure. You can run 50:1 in the tank, and use oil injection and you'll still burn down an engine if the carb is set too lean. Adding more oil to the fuel on cold days will further lean your engine. Also when removing the oiler and running pre-mix you need to re-jet because again you've leaned out the engine.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    The oiler removal is quite simple. You can pull the oil injection tank too. The weight of everything removed is about 7 lbs of needless junk. IF you remove the oiler, you have to put a spring on the cable the tees off your throttle that connected to the oiler. It's the same deal for the either the 250 or the 280. The hole near the crank can be left open, it's the hole that housed the feeble plastic gear. They made a specific model in Canada that didn't have an oiler, as guys didn't want em.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    IF you remove the oiler, you have to put a spring on the cable the tees off your throttle that connected to the oiler.
    Alternatively, you can replace the bifurcated cable with a single cable from an earlier model sled such as the Alpine. I works great.
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    So what is the big fad with removing the oiler? Are Ski-Don'ts oilers prone to failure at such a frequency that it is best to remove the oiler? Or just another fad?

    I would think if it were such a gigantic problem there would have been a massive recall and this would have hit the dominant media outlets.
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    So what is the big fad with removing the oiler? Are Ski-Don'ts oilers prone to failure at such a frequency that it is best to remove the oiler? Or just another fad?

    I would think if it were such a gigantic problem there would have been a massive recall and this would have hit the dominant media outlets.
    Has already been clearly stated that the odds of a failure are pretty slim. Some folks prefer to reduce the odds to zero. No fad at all.

    The addition of the automatic oil injector in the first place was not to increase engine performance, but as a sales gimmick targeting lazy people who could not be bothered to premix their gas. As has been stated, removing the oiler saves weight, adds storage space, and eliminates one thing that could (however unlikely) go wrong and leave a person broke down 100 miles from the nearest trapline cabin.

    If there is any "fad" associated with an auto oiler, it's in using one, not removing one.
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I can tell you first hand that the oiler in my son's older tundra wasn't working. The plastic gear was toast. My only guess about this gear failing, is that during 40 below starts, the plastic gear is brittle. When the plastic pump gear starts turning at the speed of the started engine, it has to work against oil that is as thick as cold molasses. This is only a theory though. The shaft of the gear is no thicker than a pencil, and the little gear teeth strip.

  19. #19
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Removing Oiler

    This was a somewhat common problem with older Tundras that used a plastic gear in the oiler. My 99 did it after @ 7 years of use.
    My 07 hasn't had an issue yet.
    I don't believe there are/ were nor have I heard of any other skidoos with this problem.
    Most remove it as was said to eliminate a possibility of failure leaving one stranded.
    Every manufacturer has had issues with a few machines on their lineup over the years. Some more than others.
    Last year was Arctic Cats turn with their reverse issue causing machines to lock up. That and a vent tube that caused a few to catch fire.
    Who knows what this year will bring.
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