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Thread: Moose Trimmings?

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    Default Moose Trimmings?

    What do you guys do with all the moose scraps not fit for human consumption? It would be great trap line meat. There's quite a bit of sinew that could be used for traditional crafts also. Every moose makes quite a bit and I hate to see it go to a landfill. The zoo won't take it, I already checked.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe View Post
    What do you guys do with all the moose scraps not fit for human consumption? It would be great trap line meat. There's quite a bit of sinew that could be used for traditional crafts also. Every moose makes quite a bit and I hate to see it go to a landfill. The zoo won't take it, I already checked.

    Cook it up and give it to a person who has a dog lot. Must mushers do not have time to cook it and will not take it uncooked. Just one idea.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I will sometimes give it to one of a few active trappers that I know.

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    We boil it along with all the bones we get out with, adding veggie trimmings and whatever. Then we can it all in pints for our dogs, throwing the shiny white bones in the freezer for treats all winter. Crack a jar and spill some of the juice and a few spoons of the scraps onto your dog kibble, and you have a friend for life along with great, cheap food. You brought it out, so you might as well use it.

    Funny story-

    We had a friend checking on our woodstove while we were in town for the day, and left a big old pot of this stuff simmering on the stove. Got home and there's a dirty bowl and spoon in the sink, and a note from him explaining he'd skipped breakfast and lunch, and helped himself to some of our stew since it was such a big pot. Best stew he'd had in years.

    We laughed about it and kidded him all the time, but the dogs kinda kept an eye on him after that.

    Some of you on here probably know him, and now you know how he got his nickname about 2 decades back: Alpo.

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    Thats pretty funny BrownBear. I admit that while cooking food for my kennel there has been a few times that the smell overcame me to the point where I started wondering if my dogs were eating better than I was....

    OT, I would say that theres really no reason (other than possibly loose stools) to boil or cook moose meat trimmings for dogs. They eat raw frozen meat all the time, they are built for it. I would never feed raw bear or pork, but herbivores always get fed raw in my dog yard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Thats pretty funny BrownBear. I admit that while cooking food for my kennel there has been a few times that the smell overcame me to the point where I started wondering if my dogs were eating better than I was....

    OT, I would say that theres really no reason (other than possibly loose stools) to boil or cook moose meat trimmings for dogs. They eat raw frozen meat all the time, they are built for it. I would never feed raw bear or pork, but herbivores always get fed raw in my dog yard.
    The parasites in raw moose (Taenia krabbei) can have ugly consequences. "The inside wall of the cysts are covered with white sand-like grains that are the heads of tapeworms. Each head can develop into a little tapeworm in a dog, fox, coyote or wolf. If a person incidentally ingests an egg because their hands became contaminated from cleaning up a dog stool or even from eggs stuck to the dog's coat, a cyst could develop in the person's liver"

    The quoted info is from Kimberlee Beckman, prior state vet.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    That is interesting Frostbitten. Thanks for the info, I'll have to research it a little. I will say that people have been doing it that way for many years...maybe I've just been lucky...

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    That is interesting Frostbitten. Thanks for the info, I'll have to research it a little. I will say that people have been doing it that way for many years...maybe I've just been lucky...
    I agree 100%! I just learned this last year. I don't know what the prevalence is, but it seems like an issue to keep in mind. No question that dogs have been eating raw moose for as ong as there have been dogs and moose...but that doesn't mean dogs and people cant get sick because of it. Check this https://secure.wildlife.alaska.gov/i...isease.muscle1

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    I agree 100%! I just learned this last year. I don't know what the prevalence is, but it seems like an issue to keep in mind. No question that dogs have been eating raw moose for as ong as there have been dogs and moose...but that doesn't mean dogs and people cant get sick because of it. Check this https://secure.wildlife.alaska.gov/i...isease.muscle1
    Dang, that is interesting. It does say that even if the egg is ingested by a human, that it could develop into a cyst in the persons liver. Not that I want a cyst in my liver, but it sounds like the cyst is inactive until a carnivore eats the meat and the cycle continues.

    In other words, can a human actually get tapeworms from the cyst??

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Dang, that is interesting. It does say that even if the egg is ingested by a human, that it could develop into a cyst in the persons liver. Not that I want a cyst in my liver, but it sounds like the cyst is inactive until a carnivore eats the meat and the cycle continues.

    In other words, can a human actually get tapeworms from the cyst??
    Not according to what I read.

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    Ultimately a moot point I suppose. I wouldnt want the dogs to get tapes for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    OT, I would say that theres really no reason (other than possibly loose stools) to boil or cook moose meat trimmings for dogs.
    All other considerations aside, we did it for convenience prior to canning. Didn't have freezer space at the time for us and them, and they really seemed to like that broth. Of course, those shiny white bones are popular too.

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    depends on which stage of the parasite us humans eat...

    Even Omivores get tapeworms, and roundworms, and "OH MY GOD WHAT IS THAT?"'s...


    Chris

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    You might wrap and freeze it and give it to the guy at work that is to lazy to get out there but still wants some of your meat????? Just a thought. Duckdon

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    I plan on wrapping mine up in the missus's old panti hose and using it on a line with kiddo this year. bones will be stacked for the yotes.. we have a pile of them
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Moose trimmings: Malamute food. Saves on dog food costs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckdon View Post
    You might wrap and freeze it and give it to the guy at work that is to lazy to get out there but still wants some of your meat????? Just a thought. Duckdon
    You come back from dip netting and have 20 extra fish... stick your head in the bar and ask, anyone want fish?.,.

    "are they cleaned".??.. no?, then no

    are they cleaned and filleted?... well, ok, I can help you out and take a few..


    canned, smoked??.. sure thing, I can help you, I'll take 5!

  18. #18

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    All the trimmings, bones, and vegetables boiled or simmered for hours sounds like how you make beef, chicken, and fish stock...don't toss the liquid out, use it for stock. The dogs can eat the rest.

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    We feed the bloodshot trimmings to our chickens in the winter, as protein is difficult to obtain for them once the bugs die. We split and boil all the bones, making a very rich bone broth that we can use as soup stock or just drink plain for a natural energy drink. We'll throw tendons and any extra fat thats not ground in with burger into the broth as well. Much of the best nutrition from an animal is contained within the bones; we boil them until there is nothing left but hard dried shells of bone.

    My wife convinced me this was the thing to do with bones. It really sucked for a while, because it means packing all the bones out of the field too! Still have a tough time getting my head around it, as I'm struggling along under a heavy pack... 0ne bite of stew made from the stock, though, or a nice hot mug of pure broth, and I'm over it!

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