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Thread: New to waterfowl

  1. #1
    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    Default New to waterfowl

    Ok, so i've never been waterfowl hunting but for some reason my 10 yr old boy wants to do it. I don't know how or why he developed this need to waterfowl hunt since i don't but if it will get him into hunting I guess i'll get into it too. So here's my question. What do i need to get going? I have a couple 12GA and that's about it. I've never called or anything but we all know how young kids are, if they don't have any action they get bored with it and i don't want to ruin it for him first time out. Do i really need decoys, boat, dog, etc?


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    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Congrats Dad for seeing his interest and reaching for some info here..good stuff getting the kids out. I will start this and sure more will jump in..the first thing I would do if you were south and I was back there was take you out. I really think going with someone that has all the gear would open this waterfowling world to you and your son. You would be able to ask a ton of questions, son could as well and gain a alot of knowhow on do's and dont's, gear etc. Someone on here that lives up there should jump up and take these guys out if you can.

    On a second note...there are so many things to consider, location is going to dictate alot when it comes to chasing our feathered friends..access, water depth, retrieval of birds, etc. At this point..it needs to be fun, when the youngster has had enough, it is time to go, no matter how you feel or what you want to do...with kids..get them out, explore the options, make it exciting and have fun!
    But dont walk him all over the Minto Flats and say this is duckhunting..lol

    If you know of a spot that holds some birds, go get a dozen or so decoys, go with a very easy call to learn, (DR-85 DOUBLE REED MALLARD) http://www.haydels.com/pages/duckcalls.html great call and very easy to learn how to blow and a great call in all.

    Waders are going to be a must, hip boots or whatever you got now will probably work. At this point the birds are still up there and there should be a ton of young ones..they will decoy pretty easy..decoy placement: search the net..but for a dozen or so..just spread them out about 3ft apart from each other about 20 yards from you upwind. (There is way to much to know about decoy placement and different types of spreads etc that can be utilized. Books have been written on this subject alone.)

    Introducing kids, gals and guys to this sport is something I have always enjoyed. Hit me up on a PM.. but beware..... I will fill your box with ton of answers to your questions..lol Sitting overseas and having to live through all these guys getting out is driving me nuts.. all I have is time.

    Good luck and thanks for asking.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
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    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

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    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    Default New to waterfowl

    Thanks for the info. I really had no idea that placement of decoys like upwind or downwind really mattered. I'll hit you with a PM later.


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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKHunterNP View Post
    Thanks for the info. I really had no idea that placement of decoys like upwind or downwind really mattered. I'll hit you with a PM later.


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    I'll PM you my phone number if you'd like, and you can give me a call tonight and I can try to answer any questions you might have. Not promising GOOD answers, just answers!

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DucksAndDogs View Post
    I'll PM you my phone number if you'd like, and you can give me a call tonight and I can try to answer any questions you might have. Not promising GOOD answers, just answers!
    You know were pretty close to the same schedule... I havent hunted a duck in 20 years but bought me a lab and want to get back in to it, not that I was experianced back in the day... Hint Hint

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    You know were pretty close to the same schedule... I havent hunted a duck in 20 years but bought me a lab and want to get back in to it, not that I was experianced back in the day... Hint Hint

    Shoot me a PM. Let me know when you get home. I'll be moose hunting until the 17th, but will duck hunt every other day I'm home...

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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    Your son is only 10. I would go slow, and try to make it as fun as you can. You are in N Pole, close to you, near Delta Jct, is a place you can take him and rent a blind in a field. Take some shots at cranes, maybe get some, occasionally ducks or goose also. You can have a coleman heater in the blind, be comfortable, hunt what ever flys over, maybe some rubber boots for the walk out, no need for waders, hip boots or a lot of equipment you may not want next year. I don't recall the name of the place, but should be easy to find, give them a call, reserve a blind, you can go several times this fall if you want. Take a call or 2 along to keep him entertained. Have fun. Bud
    Wasilla

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKHunterNP View Post
    Ok, so i've never been waterfowl hunting but for some reason my 10 yr old boy wants to do it. I don't know how or why he developed this need to waterfowl hunt since i don't but if it will get him into hunting I guess i'll get into it too. So here's my question. What do i need to get going? I have a couple 12GA and that's about it. I've never called or anything but we all know how young kids are, if they don't have any action they get bored with it and i don't want to ruin it for him first time out. Do i really need decoys, boat, dog, etc?
    First timers like yourselves should make sure you've got the proper stamps, find a dozen decoys (Frontier has a dozen mallard hens for $40-ish), and hit up some of the sloughs or ponds around here. You can make quacking sounds with your mouth if you think a call is too difficult. If they won't come in to your decoys, do a little scouting and figure out where a good spot to jump-shoot them might be.

    Since we share a home community, it might be easy to meet up sometime and let me show you how a decoy spread might look... or we could go hunting and I could show you that way.
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


  9. #9

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    If you are waterfowl hunting then IMHO you should have a well trained dog. The only exception I can think of is if you are hunting from a blind in a field that is cut short. Otherwise you WILL end up with wounded birds that you will never find that are either in the grass or swimming away from you. I've seen more than a few folks out waterfowling without a dog but I personally don't think it's an ethical way to hunt. For me hunting waterfowl has always been a partnership. We spend hours training and then when in the field we both enjoy our day. And there is nothing quite like the look in her eyes when she is looking at a flock coming in. She can glance at ravens or eagles all day but when she has that special look I know to get the safety off and get ready for incoming. It's also a great way to teach children the responsibilities of having a pet and being responsible for feeding and caring for one. I'd put having a dog at the very top of any list of "what do I need to hunt waterfowl".
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

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    My opinion on this mirrors other folks. If your son is interested it could be a great thing for you to learn together. Take up SkinnyD on his offer to go hunting. Get to know folks that waterfowl hunt and go with them. Then you can get an idea for the types of gear needed, and how to be succcessful. It could be a great father-son learning experience. My other suggestion is to consider a smaller gun for your son. A 12 gauge will pack a bit of a punch for a 10 year old. A 20 gauge might be much nicer on his shoulder and will help him develop better shooting skills.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  11. #11
    Member AK375HH's Avatar
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    Default New to waterfowl

    I agree with the dog being a must. It's nice to not have to chase them. You can find your cripples 90% of the time if
    They get to the grass, you can shoot ducks without worrying about a creek or deep water between you and where it lands....and it's great companionship! ImageUploadedByTapatalk1346808065.739561.jpg
    It's not skybusting if you fold em'.

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    Default New to waterfowl

    I already have the fed and state stamps signed and on my license. I know my son wouldn't like the 12GA. He didnt enjoy shooting my daughters old Pardner .410, but that is a light gun. He really just wants to get out, hunt them and be involved, not necessarily shoot. I did say 10 years old but i was talking to my daughter about her moose tag while i was typing, she's 10, my son is 7. I would take anyone up on an offer. He has some infatuation with birds, we got some grouse while out moose hunting this weekend and he loved it.


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    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    Just a repete of what I said in earlier post. Ideal for you and son, even daughter also. Call any of the local sporting goods stores and ask them for name of the place in Delta that rents blinds. These are large comfortable pit blinds, surrounded by decoys of cranes, sometimes good hunt, sometimes not so good, but thats hunting. Way cheaper then buying a lot of duck gear that you may never use again. They even have cabins you can rent the night before if desired. Mid sept it peaks there, so timing is ideal for you. Bud
    Wasilla

  14. #14
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    Default New to waterfowl

    Just found them. C&S guides. The last price i've seen is $75 per day/per person.


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    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

  15. #15

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    C&S charters is not in business this year the owner has a new job that didn't allow the free time to run the waterfowl business
    Not sure what is going to happen in the upcoming years.

  16. #16

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    We did that hunt a few years ago and were there just after the flocks move south. Didn't see a single bird for two days. Gotta hit that one just right. If it were me and I had a youngster that was really interested in waterfowl hunting (I was lucky and have a grown son and daughter who both love to fish and hunt) I would either find someone who has all the gear and has at least a few years of waterfowling under thier belt or fly somewhere south and hire a guide. There is some excellent hunting later in the year on the west coast or in the south. The last thing you want to do is to have a bad experience with a new hunter. Not saying that either of these two options would guarantee a great hunt but probably the best chance of it. Might want to start off with some trips to the sporting clays range to get a good idea of what type of shots you will be taking. And if your household is up for it get a Lab puppy and start training. Training a dog is a great life lesson. The more time you spend working with them the better the results. If the waterfowling doesn't work out Labs make great pets-as long as they get lots of exercise....
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TriIron View Post
    We did that hunt a few years ago and were there just after the flocks move south. Didn't see a single bird for two days. Gotta hit that one just right. If it were me and I had a youngster that was really interested in waterfowl hunting (I was lucky and have a grown son and daughter who both love to fish and hunt) I would either find someone who has all the gear and has at least a few years of waterfowling under thier belt or fly somewhere south and hire a guide. There is some excellent hunting later in the year on the west coast or in the south. The last thing you want to do is to have a bad experience with a new hunter. Not saying that either of these two options would guarantee a great hunt but probably the best chance of it. Might want to start off with some trips to the sporting clays range to get a good idea of what type of shots you will be taking. And if your household is up for it get a Lab puppy and start training. Training a dog is a great life lesson. The more time you spend working with them the better the results. If the waterfowling doesn't work out Labs make great pets-as long as they get lots of exercise....
    I am totally agree with you.You are 100% good here that there is some excellent hunting in the west coast or in the south.I personally visited there one year ago.
    I agreed what's said above!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry8100 View Post
    I am totally agree with you.You are 100% good here that there is some excellent hunting in the west coast or in the south.I personally visited there one year ago.
    I agreed what's said above!!!
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