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Thread: Mushrooms

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    Default Mushrooms

    I just joined and posted a thread on the hiking forum about your favorite wild mushrooms. I didnt see this forum, so... What are some of your favorite mushrooms to collect. Dont share your secret spots, because I wont be sharing mine.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScabbyMcBrittlebottom View Post
    I just joined and posted a thread on the hiking forum about your favorite wild mushrooms. I didnt see this forum, so... What are some of your favorite mushrooms to collect. Dont share your secret spots, because I wont be sharing mine.
    Since I am not a Mushroom expert I like to pick puffballs. They are easy to identify and taste good.
    My secret spots are private property so other forum members couldn't pick there anyway.
    I was thinking I need to get together with Marcus so he can give me some pointers.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Im not a mushroom expert either. There just seems to be so many edible mushrooms around and so few of us to pick em. I just dont get it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    Since I am not a Mushroom expert I like to pick puffballs.
    I get those in my yard but haven't eaten any (no expert here, either). I thought they were a spring thing, but I'm still getting them now. Maybe because this is such a wet summer?

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    I get those in my yard but haven't eaten any (no expert here, either). I thought they were a spring thing, but I'm still getting them now. Maybe because this is such a wet summer?
    I always find them in the fall. Usually around the start of duck season Sept 1st.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Hedgehog mushrooms are underappreciated and we have loads of them by Seward!

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    Default Porcini . . .

    I pick three varieties of mushrooms: morels, puffballs, and king boletes. That said, the only ones I actively "hunt" are king boletes (porcini) which are plentiful enough this time of year to make the time spent worthwhile.

    A good site: http://www.laurieconstantino.com/gat...ild-mushrooms/

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    Hedgehogs are my favorite, but ive only found them in one 10x10 spot. They have been coming back every year for the last 6 years.
    As far as boletes go, they are few and far between here. Ive been experamenting with the russulas for the past few years as they are the most abundant shroom around here.
    Last edited by ScabbyMcBrittlebottom; 09-03-2012 at 09:04. Reason: Spelling

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    My personal favorite is the morel. I also like oysters and shaggy manes. Boletas are also thrown in the sack. If I come across a clean puffball, in it goes too! Chantrells are hard to find, but pretty tastey, as are the matsutaki.

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    Default A book for first-timers . .

    Attachment 63031

    Alaska's Mushrooms is a decent, affordable guide for any wanting to get their feet wet harvesting wild mushrooms. It's available from Amazon for about $10.

    In terms of taste, I personally believe the morel tops all others. We used to harvest them in Michigan by the basketsful, drying enough each spring to last through the year. Have not had much luck here in Alaska . . always find a few but rarely enough to justify the time spent. However, we did once get into a burned-over area across Skilak one spring, second year after the burn, and picking was fantastic. If you ever get a chance, get into a burn the year after . . and take a couple five-gallon buckets.

    King boletes (boletus edulis) rank, for taste, a close second to morels, especially when dried and reconstituted. Virtually all boletes are edible with only a few, easily identifiable exceptions. Our area has tons of what I call "birch" and "brown" boletes, which, while edible, are tasteless even after drying and reconstituting.

    Lots of fun . . I like the morels, puffballs, and boletes because they are so easily identifiable. Like the lady in the blog referenced above, I leave gilled mushrooms alone . . too easy to make a mistake.

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    I think Mushrooms Demystified by david aurora is by far the best book out there for mushroom id. Its prety expensive, but the thousand plus pages are worth it for figuring out the ones that are hard to id and the sporadicaly occuring ones that we dont see very often in alaska. Lately, ive been finding some pretty interesting ones in the alpine tundra. I found Aminita velosa (sprimgtime aminita) several times in august up there and a couple agaricus that I have yet to id.

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    Default 'shroomers . .

    Quote Originally Posted by ScabbyMcBrittlebottom View Post
    I think Mushrooms Demystified by david aurora is by far the best book out there for mushroom id. Its prety expensive, but the thousand plus pages are worth it for figuring out the ones that are hard to id and the sporadicaly occuring ones that we dont see very often in alaska. Lately, ive been finding some pretty interesting ones in the alpine tundra. I found Aminita velosa (sprimgtime aminita) several times in august up there and a couple agaricus that I have yet to id.
    Couldn't agree more . . Mushrooms Demystified has got to be the absolute gold standard when it comes to mushroom identification. That said, Arora should have titled the book Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Mushrooms and Were Afraid To Or Didn't Know To Ask. I rarely look at my copy.

    And that said, it's the book if one is interested in mycology as opposed to just picking easily identifiable, edible mushrooms.

    There's a "mushroom club" here locally, and my impressions are that some 'shroomers are serious mycologists while others just want to know whether the mushrooms they see outdoors are edible.

    Attachment 63032

    About $25 from Amazon

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    We pick morels, king boletes, hericiums, hedgehogs and shaggy manes. I am very amateur. I stick to edible and choice only. My favorite by far is Hericium. So delicious, almost too pretty to eat. And good for you. And clean. Hedgehogs are pretty close second, followed by morels and boletus, then shaggy manes. I also like chantarelles, but we don't have them up here in the mat valley. Puffballs are ok.

    I went to the Cordova Fungus Fair last year. The mushrooms to be found down there in the Sitka spruce are amazing!! I just couldn't believe my eyes that all that choice edible food is growing out there free for the picking.

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    I have no idea about any type of wild mushrooms, but when I let the dogs out today, I noticed these growing in my back yard. This is the only spot, and it's a mushroom I've never seen before. I took a few pictures and figure I'd let you guys tell me what they are (I can't really find anything online). The second picture shows the size of the mushrooms (There are probably 15-20 in that little bunch) in comparison to my hand. Also, for reference, they're growing right in the middle of the yard, in direct sunlight, on the side of a hill.







    Thanks!

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    Im going to guess, Coprinus micaceus.

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    Default Mushrooms

    Can't locate my mushroom book, may have loaned it out. I don't ever recall seeing these before... Anyone with a book care to ID?

    THIS IS NOT AN ENDORSEMENT TO EAT THEM (just thought the visual texture was neat)

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1348017193.100802.jpg

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    Scaly Pholiota, Pholiota squarrosa

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScabbyMcBrittlebottom View Post
    Scaly Pholiota, Pholiota squarrosa

    Can you tell me anything about it? I'm gonna start googling, but didn't know if your book mentioned anything...



    Edit** When I look up what you said, it doesn't really look like what's in my yard. They don't have those little bumps on top of the caps like all the pictures I'm seeing or that are mentioned in all the descriptions...

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    The pholiota was what the other guy had. Yours was most likely coprinus micaceus. Glistening inky cap. Edible, but similar to C. Atramentarius, which is poisonous when you have alcohol in your system.

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    Default Fried Porcini

    Same here, Porcini most of the time. Picked some huge one's this year on the Youkon, salted and fried them in oil and made moose tenderloin fajitas. mmmmm tasty!!!
    see photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    I pick three varieties of mushrooms: morels, puffballs, and king boletes. That said, the only ones I actively "hunt" are king boletes (porcini) which are plentiful enough this time of year to make the time spent worthwhile.

    A good site: http://www.laurieconstantino.com/gat...ild-mushrooms/
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