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Thread: Howdy Y'all

  1. #1
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    Default Howdy Y'all

    Howdy everyone,

    Bob Hastings here

    the wife and I are looking at retiring early and we're pretty dead set on Alaska. I'd like to set up a small house (3 room; living/kitchen area, bedroom and a bathroom, i.e, with a wood fired tub and a composting toilet) on a piece of riverfront property (Got my eye on a few that are within 20-40 miles of a decent sized city).

    I had visited another forum and got more negative replies than positive, so I come to you good folks

    I'm mid 40's in excellent shape(Retired military and police officer) and I have the drive to make something like this happen.

    I've already got plans to buy an STX Jet Boat and a couple of snow machines. Already have an Old Town square back canoe with a 5hp motor

    I've been planning this for 25 years, calculated in the "What ifs" and think I have a pretty good plan.

    I've got experience in building log homes (One of the planning phases over 25 years) and I'm positive I can do this.

    I've also got a monthly military retirement and a good nest egg that should last quite a good while

    So again, I come to you good people. Tell me everything you know and think that I need to know


    Thanks in advance


    Bob

  2. #2

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    I would want to know a lot about the mentality of humans currently living in that area. There are areas where the locals are not receptive to people who ain't like them. Example if you ain't a doper/thief, I would avoid some areas.

  3. #3

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    Bob, I think that the info that you got on the other thread on this same forum is a lot of good info. There were things that was not said that would make things a little more challenging ,like the fact that the area you had pictures on the Big Bend on the Yentna river gets an average of 120" per winter of snow. I don't think that people were just trying to be negative. They were just trying to be real. There is nothing wrong with the ideas that you have but life is real. Even though you have the ability to do things like build a log home , how do you propose to transport the logs, How do you plan to clear the property and remove all of the stumps to put in a garden and this goes on.It can all be done but you have to have time to do it all and it can not be done in one summer season. You have to think abou where you are going to live for the first winter or so. Don't give up on your ideas just move them around some. If you want a place out on the river have a place on the road system for a base and then you can travel there and do the work but you will need a place to retreat to in the winter. Good Luck
    Last edited by Big Bend; 09-01-2012 at 12:41. Reason: Spelling

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    Bob, I think that the info that you got on the other thread on this same forum is a lot of good info. There were things that was not said that would make things a little more challenging ,like the fact that the area you had pictures on the Big Bend on the Yentna river gets an average of 120" per winter of snow. I don't think that people were just trying to be negative. They were just trying to be real. There is nothing wrong with the ideas that you have but life is real. Even though you have the ability to do things like build a log home , how do you propose to transport the logs, How do you plan to clear the property and remove all of the stumps to put in a garden and this goes on.It can all be done but you have to have time to do it all and it can not be done in one summer season. You have to think abou where you are going to live for the first winter or so. Don't give up on your ideas just move them around some. If you want a place out on the river have a place on the road system for a base and then you can travel ther and do the work but you will need a place to retreat to in the winter. Good Luck
    BB if anyone knows how real life is (Retired military and federal police officer) I do

    According to the realtor I spoke to about that property, the guy that lives across the slough lives there full time, so it CAN be done

    I DO understand that its going to take me a little time to get this done. I'm planning on about two years of work to have it put together to be comfortable, THEN keep building after I'm there

    The logs will be cut then dragged in in Winter. I can peel them in the Spring

    This CAN be done. I've got the drive to do it, and the knowledge and insight to bail early if need be

    People do this all over Alaska

    Once again, I've came here for advice and now the negativity has started again.

    With that, I'll leave this forum and hopefully will either find another who can point me in the right directions WITHOUT the negativity or will simply find another way

    I WILL do this


    Bob

  5. #5

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    Bob, I did not say that you could not do it I just said that you need to move your schedule around. I think that I know more about that area than the realtor as I have been a property owner within several hundered yards of that peice of property for about 30 years. The guy that lives across the slough is a very good friend of mine and he does not live out ther year round. If you want info about that area you can E Mail me and I will try to answer any questions about that property and the area if you want answers with out all of the other comments. Wayne

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    Default Howdy Y'all

    Bob,
    You are on the right website for real info on this topic. the sunshine and happiness forum is not on this site. Yes people do what you are talking about. Many of them are right here on this forum and they share freely what works. The land owners of the neighboring properties are literally right here sharing with you! The vast majority of people who attempt what you are talking about "wash out" of bush life usually at a heavy financial loss.

    Have you learned about building cabins on permafrost? Constructing composting toilets for use in stub zero temps? Where are you going to legally cut cabin logs? Where are you legally going to cut firewood? No doubt what you want to do can be done but every post where you rail against the people actually doing it gives less credence to your abilities and likelihood of success.

    Think back to the awful new troops you got who were constantly saying things like "back in tech school" or worse "back at Bragg" or even worse if you were Air Force "back at Lackland".... Shudder... Using your communications systems in the correct ratio will get you much further, there is a reason we got dealt a pair of ears and just the one mouth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    Bob, I think that the info that you got on the other thread on this same forum is a lot of good info. There were things that was not said that would make things a little more challenging ,like the fact that the area you had pictures on the Big Bend on the Yentna river gets an average of 120" per winter of snow. I don't think that people were just trying to be negative. They were just trying to be real. There is nothing wrong with the ideas that you have but life is real. Even though you have the ability to do things like build a log home , how do you propose to transport the logs, How do you plan to clear the property and remove all of the stumps to put in a garden and this goes on.It can all be done but you have to have time to do it all and it can not be done in one summer season. You have to think abou where you are going to live for the first winter or so. Don't give up on your ideas just move them around some. If you want a place out on the river have a place on the road system for a base and then you can travel there and do the work but you will need a place to retreat to in the winter. Good Luck
    BB so youre telling me that its not possible to live in that area year round?

  8. #8

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    Bob I will give you a few tips. The river is a good means of transportation most of the time. Freeze up and break up you are limited to airplane and that is not a sure deal as you need a airstrip, sand bar, swamp or lake. Drinking water is needed and heavy to haul and sometimes hard to find. There is drill rig on the yentna not far away and expect to pay 120.00 a foot. We had two wells drilled. A tractor/backhoe is a handy tool as a 4 wheeler and log splitter. You will need a place to park your truck,boat and snowmachines. What you want to do is doable just make sure you have the right attitude before you spend your nest egg. I am sure more people will pitch in. I am off to the moose stand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Bob,
    You are on the right website for real info on this topic. the sunshine and happiness forum is not on this site. Yes people do what you are talking about. Many of them are right here on this forum and they share freely what works. The land owners of the neighboring properties are literally right here sharing with you! The vast majority of people who attempt what you are talking about "wash out" of bush life usually at a heavy financial loss.
    Thanks. that why I came to this forum

    Have you learned about building cabins on permafrost? Constructing composting toilets for use in stub zero temps?

    No and yes.
    Thats why i came to the forum (Again). Educate me. The composting toilet I plan on being INSIDE the house. With a good stove going it should work just fine

    {QUOTE] Where are you going to legally cut cabin logs? Where are you legally going to cut firewood? No doubt what you want to do can be done but every post where you rail against the people actually doing it gives less credence to your abilities and likelihood of success. [/QUOTE]

    i have to do a little more research, but from what I've already research, you can cut off of state or federal land with permits

    Think back to the awful new troops you got who were constantly saying things like "back in tech school" or worse "back at Bragg" or even worse if you were Air Force "back at Lackland".... Shudder... Using your communications systems in the correct ratio will get you much further, there is a reason we got dealt a pair of ears and just the one mouth.
    Only got that once or twice from troops. What I did in that situation was let them tell what they know and add to it, not tell them what they knew was not going to work.

    Folks all I'm asking is dont be negative about it. Tell me what I need to do to make it work, Not how its not going to work


    Bob
    Last edited by Bob Hastings; 09-01-2012 at 16:54. Reason: Fat Fingers

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    Quote Originally Posted by pa18tony View Post
    Bob I will give you a few tips. The river is a good means of transportation most of the time. Freeze up and break up you are limited to airplane and that is not a sure deal as you need a airstrip, sand bar, swamp or lake. Drinking water is needed and heavy to haul and sometimes hard to find. There is drill rig on the yentna not far away and expect to pay 120.00 a foot. We had two wells drilled. A tractor/backhoe is a handy tool as a 4 wheeler and log splitter. You will need a place to park your truck,boat and snowmachines. What you want to do is doable just make sure you have the right attitude before you spend your nest egg. I am sure more people will pitch in. I am off to the moose stand.

    thank you sir. that the kind of info I'm looking for

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I would want to know a lot about the mentality of humans currently living in that area. There are areas where the locals are not receptive to people who ain't like them. Example if you ain't a doper/thief, I would avoid some areas.
    I'll keep that in mind. thanks!

    Bob

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    Just FYI to everyone here, I've pretty much given up on that area. I took the advice of a few of you and am looking over at the Glenallen area, where I found a piece of property for a good price. Its off the grid and only a little bit off the road (It has an easement which I'm sure I could turn into a road) While its not right on a river its close.

    I can take mothly trips to Anchorage for major shopping, and take the hour drive to Chitina for salmon.

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    There are a large number of members here that live work and/or play in the Glenallen area. If you were to have questions about the price of food/gas/etc there, or the availability of some supplies, or anything else about the area, I bet you'd get a lot of great answers.

    I'll kick it off with one tip: Eureka Cafe. Eureka is just West of Glenallen. Great breakfasts, and the only 25 cent coffee I'm aware of anywhere. Oh yeah, and the waitresses are nice to you.... well, if you like that surly-Mom look... ;-)

    Good luck. You're planning for a tough trip but you know that.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hastings View Post
    Just FYI to everyone here, I've pretty much given up on that area. I took the advice of a few of you and am looking over at the Glenallen area, where I found a piece of property for a good price. Its off the grid and only a little bit off the road (It has an easement which I'm sure I could turn into a road) While its not right on a river its close.

    I can take mothly trips to Anchorage for major shopping, and take the hour drive to Chitina for salmon.
    Very cold long winters, perma-frost area. What kind of easement (Very important).......???

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Very cold long winters, perma-frost area. What kind of easement (Very important).......???
    that I'm not sure of at this time. Still working on the info. If its a wide enough easement then one should be able to build a road on it

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    =FamilyMan;1169149. Oh yeah, and the waitresses are nice to you.... well, if you like that surly-Mom look... ;-)
    Be still, my heart........

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    There are a large number of members here that live work and/or play in the Glenallen area. If you were to have questions about the price of food/gas/etc there, or the availability of some supplies, or anything else about the area, I bet you'd get a lot of great answers.
    Tell me about the hunting in the area

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hastings View Post
    Tell me about the hunting in the area
    Caribou hunting is good. As a local resident you should qualify for some federal subsistence caribou permits. In addition to that, you can apply for caribou permits through the once per year state run drawing.

    Moose hunting is less good, but they're there. You'll have grizzlys though not tons of them, some of them very large (i.e., stands 10 feet tall).

    You can trap and ice fishing is good.

    Wintertimes you'll of course be prepared for the cold snap that we sometimes get where it gets colder than 20 below for a few weeks without reprieve.

    There's a lot more but that's a start, OK?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pa18tony View Post
    There is drill rig on the yentna not far away and expect to pay 120.00 a foot
    Whats the average depth of the water table in that area?

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Caribou hunting is good. As a local resident you should qualify for some federal subsistence caribou permits. In addition to that, you can apply for caribou permits through the once per year state run drawing.

    Moose hunting is less good, but they're there. You'll have grizzlys though not tons of them, some of them very large (i.e., stands 10 feet tall).

    You can trap and ice fishing is good.

    Wintertimes you'll of course be prepared for the cold snap that we sometimes get where it gets colder than 20 below for a few weeks without reprieve.

    There's a lot more but that's a start, OK?

    Thats great info. With enough wood cutting in the Summer I should have enough for the winter

    Trapping is something that I'm looking forward to. Been putting back traps for awhile. Mostly Conibears, but I have a good amount of leg holds and a whole bunch of snares.

    Bob

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