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Thread: Good year for rsapberries

  1. #1
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Default Good year for rsapberries

    Getting lots . Over 4 gallon so far.
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  2. #2
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    Default Good year for rsapberries

    Just picked about 3 gallons of Goldens and probably 3 gallons of reds to pick.

    Between those and the peas I can't keep up.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    You guys are killing me. I was midway through constructing a large addition to my garden for peas and raspberries a couple of months ago when we learned that my youngest's health problems were due to his allergy to nickel. Nickel? It turns out that raspberries and peas are both high in nickel. Argh!

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    You guys are killing me. I was midway through constructing a large addition to my garden for peas and raspberries a couple of months ago when we learned that my youngest's health problems were due to his allergy to nickel. Nickel? It turns out that raspberries and peas are both high in nickel. Argh!

    why build when they grow wild all over ? cept peas
    Semper Fi!

  5. #5
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    Default Good year for rsapberries

    GT- they get far bigger when you grow cultivated varieties versus the wild berries and it's a lot less work to grow them than to have to go where they live.

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1346121094.929226.jpg
    Third gallon of Goldens and first of
    Reds. The reds are smaller than normal this year but the Goldens are normal sized.


    Brian- you may find that he is not allergic but merely sensitive. A couple berries for an infant is like several cups for a human, enough to overwhelm the blood stream for quite a while. You might try such foods as peas and raspberries in extreme moderation along with regularly including small amounts of foods in his diet that help to chelate metals. Two easy to find foods are citris fruit and cilantro.

    Not saying the allergy is not legitimate, but it very likely could just be a hypersensitivity. We know less than we think we do with these allergy tests and whatnot.

  6. #6
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andweav View Post
    Brian- you may find that he is not allergic but merely sensitive. A couple berries for an infant is like several cups for a human, enough to overwhelm the blood stream for quite a while. You might try such foods as peas and raspberries in extreme moderation along with regularly including small amounts of foods in his diet that help to chelate metals. Two easy to find foods are citris fruit and cilantro.

    Not saying the allergy is not legitimate, but it very likely could just be a hypersensitivity. We know less than we think we do with these allergy tests and whatnot.
    Thanks for the advice. At this point we're playing it pretty conservatively, as he had some very serious digestive tract symptoms and they mostly cleared up when we went on a low-nickel diet. We can't eliminate it completely and we understand that low doses are generally tolerable, but raspberries, dark chocolate, soy, and a few other things are really high in nickel so we're just avoiding those things altogether to try to get his symptoms under control. The boy was truly miserable, so forgoing raspberries is a small price to pay....though I love them dearly and hope he grows out of this.

  7. #7
    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    Our realitively young [3-year old] goldens [~ 3 dozen plants and spreading] have double as many berries as last year. I relocated our reds from under the eve of the house [original owners plantend them there] to a place where they can get better light and more natural water. The reds started out great as I waited until they just sprouted leaves in spring to move them. After leafing up wounderfully, it wasn't long until they took a turn for the worst and started dying off [lost about 1/3 of the plants] and only produced a very small handful of fruit for two dozen plants. Hopeful for another banner year next season but in the meantime...I did locate the biggest patch of wild berries I've seen in a very long time. We ate a bunch fresh and put up a dozen jars of wild red raspberry jam. Enjoy the bounty everyone!

  8. #8
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Our Reds didn't produce quite as well this year as last year, and I blamed it on the cool and cloudy weather we've had this season. However, the wife and I did pick about 6 gallons then gave up and she called in a friend of hers who has a lot of kids. Today the wife is mailing a medium box (if it fits, it ships) full of Raspberry jelly to the grandkids in Colorado. I made sure to hold back an ample supply of 1/2 pint jars full of Raspberry Jam for my wintertime supply of PBJ's.

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