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Thread: Campfire and moose

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    Default Campfire and moose

    Anyone ever think a campfire scared moose away?

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    Member skybust's Avatar
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    I have a camp fire while moose hunting and most of the people I know do also. Now we dont have a hugh bonfire hope this helps. Chris
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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Pretty sure that everyone that has the ability to have a fire while moose or caribou hunting has one. Never heard of any negative aspects of it but have heard more than one story about bulls coming into people chopping wood for the fire.

    The area you are hunting has plenty of forest fires in it and around it so the animals are used to the smell and the smoke.

  4. #4

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    Campfires, human scent, and the noise made will alert the local animals to your location. The wary animal should avoid you but the young may investigate the source. Travelling animals would smell and hear the site from afar and they too may swing by to check things out. Personally I camp well away from where I hunt and keep the fire and noise to a minimum. Orient the site so the smell and noise is directed toward the areas where you'd least likely see game, places like that over-used ATV trail or the hunt camp you passed an hour before.

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    People stink, especially to a wild animal. I can't imagine a fire is any worse than a bunch of guys stinking up a camp for days, plus the oil and gas of the boats, food smells not to mention a fire. Camp is usually noisy too. Human sounds are probably worse than the fire smell. The fire might be the only thing that is natural about a camp actually. The smoke does however travel a long ways and arguably does not help. I guess it depends on how close you are to your prey, how quiet you are and how much you can keep the other camp smells down to a minimum. We had a fire maybe 4 of the 10 days on the Yukon. Mostly because we were out hunting most of the time or taking a nap during the day. It was also warm most of the time. Other hunts we had one all the time. Seems like there was always somebody around the fire doing that thing. Come to think of it, we have had moose walk through camp at night when on the Susitna, and I am sure we had a fire.

    We have talked about making a tight camp and being sneaky to hunt moose. It usually turns out to be a big refugee camp instead. Maybe I am missing something.

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    I have read that smoke is natural and some use it to mask human smells when going afield. Food for thought.

    George

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    We keep a fire going and found it doesn't seem to affect the moose. I have woke up to bulls grunting before daybreak within 100 yards of the tent, the fire still smoldering from the night before.
    When they start to rut, late Sept., I believe they drop thier guard and loose thier mind and a fire does not come into play.
    As mentioned above, it likely helps to mask your stink after a week in the bush.
    BK

  8. #8

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    I will never hesitate to build a fire if I am camping. It may have some "affect" on animals, but for moose, I don't think so. Have had big bon fires burning and have moose coming into calls standing by the fire, so not something I would worry about.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    Campfires, human scent, and the noise made will alert the local animals to your location. The wary animal should avoid you but the young may investigate the source. Travelling animals would smell and hear the site from afar and they too may swing by to check things out. Personally I camp well away from where I hunt and keep the fire and noise to a minimum. Orient the site so the smell and noise is directed toward the areas where you'd least likely see game, places like that over-used ATV trail or the hunt camp you passed an hour before.
    I find this not the case at all. When I was new to moose I prescribed to low scent/noise etc. After punching tags yearly myself....and buddies in camp as well....fires, cooking, chainsaws etc. make absolutely no difference.....those goes x10 when they start responding to calls. Have called all night around a campfire, woke up, got in the boat to go to my "non stinky" hunting area, and heard buddies rifle report felling the moose that sat there all night waiting to find some butt to kick....from right behind camp.

    Moose are many things, but sneaky, wary, or overly intelligent are not among them. They just live in rough places, can be nocturnal, and are flippin huge when on the ground. Those are the challenges to focus on for moose.

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Default Campfire and moose

    Yep I wouldn't sweat it. Once had a fire burning on the banks in the wee hours while butchering a moose. Had another bull come in while loading up the meat.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  11. #11

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    Over the years am guessing we had about a dozen bulls come into camp during the middle of the day when we were relaxing around the camp fire. I am convinced the sound of chopping wood is what brought them in.
    Some we shot, hard to argue with a 60 incher who is 15 yards from the meat pole standing there looking at you.

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    I kinda doubt any campfire in Unit 20A will overpower that **** Dry Creek fire right now . . . lol.

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    I'm more concerned with Brown Bears investigating the cooking at camp than concerned whether a moose would choose to stay out of sight or go around.

    Yep, had plenty of unintended encounters with moose when picking berries or shooting arrows at the foam targets. Generally think the moose hear the repeated and off-rythmic noise (berry hitting the side of the bucket or the "thuck" noise of the arrow hitting the target) that gained their curiosity and brought them in.

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    Member ArcticNorseman's Avatar
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    those must be some really impressive berries you're picking -- huge! . . . lol.

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    We have one every year and it doesn't make a difference that I can tell. Actually think it helps sometimes. I sometimes think that if we relax and just enjoy ourselves we see more animals that if we are casting off vibes that animals pick up on. Have a fire and enjoy the trip.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    I find this not the case at all. When I was new to moose I prescribed to low scent/noise etc. After punching tags yearly myself....and buddies in camp as well....fires, cooking, chainsaws etc. make absolutely no difference.....those goes x10 when they start responding to calls. Have called all night around a campfire, woke up, got in the boat to go to my "non stinky" hunting area, and heard buddies rifle report felling the moose that sat there all night waiting to find some butt to kick....from right behind camp.

    Moose are many things, but sneaky, wary, or overly intelligent are not among them. They just live in rough places, can be nocturnal, and are flippin huge when on the ground. Those are the challenges to focus on for moose.
    May i call you yoda? well said sir! Given a choice of having gas/oil/food/man stink around camp, i prefer a fire. I prefer to smell like smoke myslef ( some day i would like to own charcole super scent blocker clothing) BUt in all serousness, when you stalk or call in an animal, i go from the down wind side so scent is kind of a moot point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Pretty sure that everyone that has the ability to have a fire while moose or caribou hunting has one. Never heard of any negative aspects of it but have heard more than one story about bulls coming into people chopping wood for the fire.

    The area you are hunting has plenty of forest fires in it and around it so the animals are used to the smell and the smoke.
    have to agree. we have big fires, and have had bulls come in while swinging the maul. dont think they could care less.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    30 years of hunting moose has taught me that they couldn't care less about smoke. Or human voice, etc. We have shot them in camp, both day light and right at dusk. Wearing bright red shirts or the stealth camo. doesn't matter. Moose love the sound of chopping wood. One of my most effective moose calls is beating a heavy stick across a spruce tree. Even the sound of a chain saw doesn't bother them.
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    I know for a fact moose and bottle rockets don't mix well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    I know for a fact moose and bottle rockets don't mix well.
    Maybe you need to work on your aim?

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