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Thread: Canoe Repair

  1. #1
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    Default Canoe Repair

    Hello some of my inlaws have an old aluminum canoe in the back yard that has been sitting for awhile I believe it's a grumman but I'm not completely sure. I do know it is missing a handful of rivets on the bottom not sure about other spots. Is this a pretty simple fix I figure it will be my winter project. Would I be able to just rivet it back together, what type of sealant would be good to put in there before riveting if needed.

    Thanks

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    3M makes a great marine sealant...can't remember the name...something like 5200, but google will. If you don't have the tools to rivet, take it to your nearby airport and find an A&P and he/she can fix your rivet problem in a jiffy or find a riveting friend...pun intended!!
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    The sealant is 5200 and there is nothing you can't do with it (besides get it out our your clothing or hair!). Lowrider had good suggestions and like he said, if you find someone to help you, it can be accomplished with simple tools. Quick way to find faulty rivets is to fill the canoe with just enough water to locate the leaks and circle them. I am not sure what kind of rivets you will want to use but i do know that you do not want to use pop-rivets. good luck and have fun!

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    There used to be a guy out at Merrill Field, John Pratt, who owns or owned Pratt Aviation Services. He's a really good sheet metal hand; I've worked with him before. General Aviation is slow in the winter months, he may have time to pull your canoe into his small hangar and drive a few rivets for you, for a fee, of course. He was on the west end of the airfield, near the avionics shop.

  5. #5
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    get the rivit problem fixed frist , then do the leak test you can get the rivits your self , but unless you have the tools for sheet metal work get some help then do your leak test

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    You don't need the sealant if you know how to rivet. You can use soft rivets or single dimple AD aircraft rivets. If you don't know how to drive and buck solid rivets, don't experiment on your boat. The damage you will do will be hard to undo. Pay or buy a six-pack for an aircraft mechanic to show you how to drive rivets.....also drilling out leaking rivets should be done by someone who knows how, without making the hole bigger or out of round....simple repair for an A&P mechanic....

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    You don't need the sealant if you know how to rivet. You can use soft rivets or single dimple AD aircraft rivets. If you don't know how to drive and buck solid rivets, don't experiment on your boat. The damage you will do will be hard to undo. Pay or buy a six-pack for an aircraft mechanic to show you how to drive rivets.....also drilling out leaking rivets should be done by someone who knows how, without making the hole bigger or out of round....simple repair for an A&P mechanic....
    Drilling out aluminum rivets really isn't difficult with the right tools. Getting a good center punch centered on the head of the rivet is the key. If you punch off center, you'll end up with an elongated hole, which will have to be drilled out until it's round again and then filled with a larger rivet. If it's close to the edge of a piece of metal, you may be screwed. #30 drill bit is the right size to go with a 5/32" rivet, which is the standard (sort of) on an aircraft, but I always use a size smaller, #31. If you don't hold the drill at a perfect right angle to the sheet metal, you'll end up with an elongated whole. If you do it right, the head of the rivet ust rides up your drill bit while the body falls out.

    As cub said, don't experiment on the boat. get some scrap metal to learn on. Also, don't use an air hammer, use a 4x rivet gun. Air hammers are too inprecise, and too difficult to control.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the info I'll look around kenai for a aircraft guy I will prolly find a few

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