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Thread: Dalton Hwy-One ton pickup and 18k 5th wheel

  1. #1

    Default Dalton Hwy-One ton pickup and 18k 5th wheel

    Planning RV trip on the Dalton for Summer 2013 and have a good idea what the road conditions are going to be (prepared for POOR). I am aware of a few campgrounds both uninproved and improved but my rig is self sufficient. Are there decent turnoffs every now and then that might support such a beast. Soft shoulders won't cut it and the turning radius is poor, crew cab and 40' 5th wheel. What are your thoughts?

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    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    Yes, there are plenty of places to bull a rig like that over and camp, but I personally wouldn't. Trailer tires on rigs like that notoriously suck, and I wouldn't want to have to deal with that. Also, you'd have to do a lot of pulling over, letting the big rigs by (they should have tacit priority over you), and having a large trailer makes that tough in a lot of cases. I personally would look at a way to sleep in the back of your truck, keeping the axles to a minimum.

    YMMV

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    Yeah I agree with Akheloce. It's not a road for camper/RV's. I saw a family in one changing flat tires on the side of the road on my trip. The issue is that the gravel is sharp, and your rig is heavy. That equates to easily blown tires. There are no services out there, besides Coldfoot, but folks will stop to help you out. Take at lest 2 spare tires. Good luck. I would love to drive the Haul Rd again, but not in a rig like that.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    You had better be prepared to repair your water lines if you are going to take water in the tank. This is not a road for "recreation" as it is a working road for big trucks...have a CB so you can stay out of there way! Expect a lot of damage to the front of your 5er as the truck going the other direction will be going fast and throwing a lot of rocks. I would take at least four spare tires for the trailer alone. Expect to go no faster than 5-10 MPH on many sections of the road. Inspect your leaf springs regularly and be prepared to repair them on the road. Because it is a working road, personally I would Never take my 5er on it. I have driven it may times hauling a boat, and have seen many boat trailers come apart on the road...needing welding repairs on the road...not fun and expensive! Just my opinion...
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    You may consider setting camp at the Yukon bridge and making days trips north on the haul rd in your truck. That'd possibly safe some strife.
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

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    Member fshgde's Avatar
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    I haven't driven it in a few years but shoulders of the road can be very soft in wet weather. I don't believe there are any campgrounds with services. There are undeveloped areas but that is a big rig to get around. there is an undeveloped area at jim river and old pipeline camp and one at chandlar. I think driving to coldfoot is doable but maybe day trip after that.

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    In general, I agree with the recommendations saying it is a bad idea. If you decide to go anyhow, there is a nice long pullout area at grayling lake. Also, I would make sure that you have 10 ply tires (or higher) on everything. Even with 10 plies I would take a bunch of spares.

  8. #8

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    truck and RV have E rated tires already...I'll test it with the truck first but more then likely the RV will sit somewhere safe, flat and away from errant stones

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    Member Derby06's Avatar
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    They aren't talking about stones while its parked. They're talking about them coming off your truck and all the oncoming truck traffic while you are driving...
    E rated tires can/will still blow out with poor road conditions.

  10. #10
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    I've pulled my tow behind as far as the Yukon river..

    About 15 minutes past the river there is a public campground near a little summer restaurant called the Hot Spot Cafe. There is a water hose and well pump here as well as a dump station but No electric... This is the last dump station until Deadhorse.


    If its getting late there is Prospect Creek Airport near pump station 5..... However I would only use this in a bind.

    Next camping is Cold-foot they have Electric and water but no dump station. Marion creek public Campground is just a few miles up the road but has no services it is however Usually well Maintained.

    My next choice after that would be a campground near Galbraith airport......Though the State has been doing road work here and this will be nightmare getting in and out in the summer. Once again there no services.

    There is a few gravel pits and pull offs between there and Prudhoe however due to construction.....Good luck

    As Stated before this road is rough....and if it rains a little I have seen several 5ers spin out on some of the steeper longer grades. Good tires and possibly chains are a must.

    I wouldn't personally be pulling my rig past the Yukon.......

    good luck whatever way you decide.

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    I Also wanted to mention to you that if it's raining remember to slip it into 4x4... And if the Yukon river bridge is wet be careful..I once saw a tour bus fishtail on almost hit the rail on that bridge... It's an old wooden planked bridge thats on a grade sloping up to the south it gets quite slick.

    that road goes from bad to worse in the rain....your going to have trouble pulling off and letting big rigs by due to all the mud. I've seen trucks with trailers stuck in pull offs before.

    I recommend going in mid to late June. And if the rain starts I might just stay camped a day or 2.

    Just my 2 cents

  12. #12

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    Ggreat advice from everyone.
    Considering the RV is my home, the Yukon River will be as far north as she'll travel.

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    I have friends in Homer who have pulled thier 38ft 5th wheel up to the Arctic Circle campground.
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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    If you give yourself time, you can park your trailer at the Yukon and do a day trip north without it. I think most of the road from the bridge to Coldfoot is now paved or chip sealed and might be easy to haul over unless it is all broken up. My big concern would be Atigun pass as the rock are so sharp from that point north that you would have to go very very slow and truckers would/could cause you big time problems. Somewhere in the Jim River area there is a big old road construction camp area that I don't think is used any more, and there use to be a number of trailers parked there...you would have many places to park your rig and it is easy to see from the road. The Arctic Circle Camp Ground is a federal campground (I think) with lots of places for a big rig too. Depending on how many folks are ahead of you, you might be able to park at the North Fork of the Koyakuk if memory serves me right too. Coldfoot has a huge cleared flat area to park and I am not sure what they may charge...but they have gas/diesel, food, and showers as well. I have not gone down the Wiseman road, so no help there...
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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