View Poll Results: What do you call the landlocked salmon commonly found in the stocked lakes of Alaska?

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  • "Kokanee" or "Kokanee salmon"

    12 20.34%
  • Their actual scientific or common name ie: Sockeye or Red salmon, Coho or Silver ,Chinook or King

    6 10.17%
  • Stocked salmon

    4 6.78%
  • landlocked salmon

    31 52.54%
  • lake salmon

    0 0%
  • freshwater salmon

    1 1.69%
  • other. Please explain

    5 8.47%
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Thread: What do you call the landlocked salmon commonly found in the Stocked lakes of Alaska?

  1. #1
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default What do you call the landlocked salmon commonly found in the Stocked lakes of Alaska?

    This poll comes as a result of the "white/pink King" thread in the saltwater fishing forum.
    Although the correct definition of "Kokanee" only refers to a Sockeye or red salmon my vernacular refers to any landlocked Salmon in Alaska especially those stocked by ADF&G as Kokanee.
    Regardless of whether they are Silvers,Kings or any other Salmon species.
    So what do you call a stocked landlocked salmon where you fish in Alaska?
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  2. #2
    Member Hayduke's Avatar
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    I call em landlocked salmon. I grew up in OR where we had true Kokanee. It would feel weird to call a silver a koke.

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    I call 'em landlocked salmon. ADF&G stocks coho in a lot of lakes, and occaisionally chinook too. They do not currently stock any sockeye in lakes as far as I know, therefore it would not be accurate to call the landlocked salmon in the lakes they stock kokanee. There are some natural populations of kokanee in AK, though not many.

  4. #4
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayduke View Post
    I call em landlocked salmon. I grew up in OR where we had true Kokanee. It would feel weird to call a silver a koke.
    That makes sense being you grew up with reds being the Kokanee in your area.
    I will have to check but I don't recall any peninsula lake being stocked with reds or any landlocked lake having a natural population of them.
    Ever since I have been catching them here on the central peninsula(since 1996) Most people that I run into fishing for them refer to them as kokanee or recognize what I mean when I use the term.
    I did not grow up fishing for them so when locals who have lived in this area 30+ years called them kokanee when I first started fishing for them the name stuck with me.
    Either way When I say Kokanee people understand and I do not have to explain that I was fishing salmon in a landlocked lake versus the river or ocean. Especially in the winter when I say I caught a bunch of salmon and people immediatley assume I was saltwater fishing in Homer or Seward for feeder kings.
    When I say Kokanee they know I was lake fishing and that's all that matters to me. That people understand what I mean whether or not I use the term exactly as defined by Webster.
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  5. #5
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Kokanee is the landlocked version of a Sockeye, and the name is not applicable to any other species. Have never heard any other landlocked salmon species referred to by anything other than their normal common or proper name. Why the landlocked version of Sockeye has a special name, while other species do not, I do not know.
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    Default What do you call the landlocked salmon commonly found in the Stocked lakes of Alaska?

    I've always known it as landlocked sockeye, but my relatives in Montana and Washington refer to any landlocked salmon as Kokanee.

  7. #7
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Well I did some checking and ADF&G does not list any Peninsula lakes as being stocked with sockeye.
    What was also interesting is that some lakes were listed as having Landlocked coho and others although also landlocked lakes list having coho (silver) salmon with no mention of the word "landlocked" .
    Also Sport lake is listed as having stocked Chinook(King) with out the word landlocked and yet it also says landlocked coho are stocked.
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ngsport.region
    I too wonder why only the landlocked red salmon have a unique name.
    I guess some of this is similiar to Burbot. Here they are Burbot yet in Minnesota they are mistakenly called Eelpout(a saltwater fish ala Wikepedia) and in the eastern states they are called lings or sometimes lawyer.
    Walker Minnesota even has a world famous Eelpout festival attended by thousands of people each year. They use the name Eelpout incorrectly and have been for generations yet they don't seem to mind and neither does anybody else ( except maybe the fish).
    My alternate on the slope is from Montana and calls Lake Trout "Mackinaw" or "Macks". My friend from bethel who grew up in Maine calls them "Togue". I call them Lake Trout though truly they are a Char.
    Potatoe-Potato Tomatoe-Tomato.
    I guess to me it matters little what the true name is and I would never insult anyone no matter what name they give to them so long as it isn't insulting to anybody.Or the fish for that matter as in a derogatory slang name.
    Like I said many of my friends say Kokanee but they have only been fishing here for 40+ years(some of them). Maybe I need to correct them because we might be insulting the fish and we wouldn't want to hurt their little feelings.
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  8. #8
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    I have always called a sockeye in a land locked lake a Kokanee. I learned to call them that from my grandfather who took me to Cooper Lake thirty years ago where there is a wild population. Cooper Lake is land locked due to unnatural circumstances (power-plant). People also refer to the Sockeye in Hidden Lake and Skilak Lake as Kokanee when those fish fail to migrate out to the ocean and become large.

  9. #9
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    I went with "stocked Salmon"... was toss-up between that and landlocked. Most "landlocked" salmon in Alaska are stocked. I know of only three lakes with naturally occuring Landlocked salmon, and you can probably trace those strains of fish to earthquake activities closing off the waterways.

    Chris

  10. #10

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    I think it might be difficult to get an accurate sample of what name the average fishermen uses to describe any landlocked salmon from this site. The people on this forum are very educated in fish matters so I think most will use the name 'Kokanee' only for sockeye.
    Many people I meet while fishing call any land locked salmon 'kokanee' and I never cared to correct them. Im sure if you stood at a sportsman's warehouse or the fishing section at wallmart you'd get a lot of people who call any landlocked salmon a 'kokanee'.
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  11. #11
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    I think it might be difficult to get an accurate sample of what name the average fishermen uses to describe any landlocked salmon from this site. The people on this forum are very educated in fish matters so I think most will use the name 'Kokanee' only for sockeye.
    Many people I meet while fishing call any land locked salmon 'kokanee' and I never cared to correct them. Im sure if you stood at a sportsman's warehouse or the fishing section at wallmart you'd get a lot of people who call any landlocked salmon a 'kokanee'.
    Point well taken Sodabiscuit.
    One thing it does show though is that of the members here there are many different names for the same fish.
    I think a lot of what hapens is we begin using a term or name for something where it soon becomes part of our vernacular.
    Even if the term is used incorrectly it doesn't matter to us because we understand it's meaning.
    In this case use of any of the poll choices would most likely clue the listener in on what a person was fishing for without need for further explanation of what they were catching or that it was caught in a lake and not the river or ocean.
    For instance if I said I caught a limit of Coho yesterday many people would ask if it was in the Kenai or saltwater. Due to the dismal silver return to date many people would be curious where I got them.
    But, if I say I caught a limit of Kokanee or landlocked salmon or similar wording they immediatley realize I was fishing in a lake catching what are normally a smaller coho and not their larger anadramous relatives.
    Of the 7 choices in my poll so far only one option has not been picked.
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  12. #12
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    If they are stocked I call them stocked king, cohos...... whatever. If they are wild I call them landlocked kings, cohos....whatever. If they are landlocked sockeye, I call them kokanee.

    If we're just going to call all freshwater salmon kokanee, we can just call all sea run trout Steelhead. Won't that be a surprise when I catch a sea run cutthroat and tell everyone it was a steelhead.

    If I catch a dolly in a lake I don't call it a lake trout. The discussion of lake trout being called Macks in Montana, or burbot being called lings in Minnesota doesn't relate here since they are regional names for a specific species of fish.

    Just because a bunch of people got it wrong doesn't make it right. Kokanee are landlocked sockeye. This poll wreaks of boredom and hurt feelers because you got corrected (pretty respectfully I might add) on another thread.

    We have lakes in SE with kokanee (landlocked sockeye) and kokanee is used in the regs to describe landlocked sockeye. If you're mistaken on species ID you could find yourself in hot water with AWT. My suggestion is to take Muttley's advice about terminology and learn from it. He could have just saved you a potential fine.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  13. #13
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBoater View Post
    If they are stocked I call them stocked king, cohos...... whatever. If they are wild I call them landlocked kings, cohos....whatever. If they are landlocked sockeye, I call them kokanee.

    If we're just going to call all freshwater salmon kokanee, we can just call all sea run trout Steelhead. Won't that be a surprise when I catch a sea run cutthroat and tell everyone it was a steelhead.

    If I catch a dolly in a lake I don't call it a lake trout. The discussion of lake trout being called Macks in Montana, or burbot being called lings in Minnesota doesn't relate here since they are regional names for a specific species of fish.

    Just because a bunch of people got it wrong doesn't make it right. Kokanee are landlocked sockeye. This poll wreaks of boredom and hurt feelers because you got corrected (pretty respectfully I might add) on another thread.

    We have lakes in SE with kokanee (landlocked sockeye) and kokanee is used in the regs to describe landlocked sockeye. If you're mistaken on species ID you could find yourself in hot water with AWT. My suggestion is to take Muttley's advice about terminology and learn from it. He could have just saved you a potential fine.
    Where I fish on the Kenai peninsula the limit on salmon in the lakes is 10 per day regardless of species,size,or time of year and gear types also remain the same regardless of species,time of year etc.. That being said regardless of what you call them the limit is the same so I have never been in any jeopardy of a fine or other criminal action regardless of my terminology.
    The regs read "Salmon stocked in lakes 10 per day 10 in possesion combined"
    .http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/re...2scregbook.pdf
    I would assume as is the case here in Southcentral Steelhead in Southeast have distinct seasons and limits. Probably different than searun Dollies or Cutthroats. So you would be better off calling the fish by individual name.
    As far as the regional name thing as you can see from the poll I am not the only Alaskan who calls them all Kokanee.
    I suppose you could say that it is a regional name used by many people here on the Peninsula. Used correctly or not it is a regional name just like a Burbot in Alaska is an Eelpout in MN. I guess those MN anglers should watch out or they may get a ticket for catching a saltwater species down there during the International Eelpout festival in Walker.Hate to see anyone get a ticket from their local game warden for catching one. I'll warn my friends down there right now.lol
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eelpout
    My goal with this poll is to see if there are others in this area who use the same terminology as I do. So far it appears there are several others who do. There are also other names used by many Alaskan anglers as you can see fron the poll at least 6 different names are used for these fish and most don't call them by their proper name. at least not in a general sense such as when saying they are fishing for landlocked salmon.
    What do you suppose a leo would say if I was driving home with my driftboat and was pulled over and told him I had just caught 10 Coho or 10 Kings? Yeah I would quickly be asked to see my fish and answer some questions.
    If I said I just caught 10 kokanees there would certainly be less scrutiny. I could also say landlocked salmon and it would insinuate the same thing.
    We all have our opinion and our own names for certain things be they Merriam Websters definition or not.


    By the way at least I can say I have have not resorted to name calling in any of my posts or threads.
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  14. #14
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Kokanee is the landlocked version of a Sockeye, and the name is not applicable to any other species. Have never heard any other landlocked salmon species referred to by anything other than their normal common or proper name. Why the landlocked version of Sockeye has a special name, while other species do not, I do not know.
    It's due to the fact that no other Pacific salmon can live its entire life and reproduce in freshwater and have their off spring's entire life cycle take place in freshwater. No other Pacific salmon can do this, so no additional names are given to other species.
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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    I call them landlocked salmon, unless it's a Kokanee (Sockeye). I wouldn't call any salmon from a landlocked lake a Kokanee because it isn't a Kokanee just because it's landlocked. It's like Sodabiscuit said, people on here are pretty educated when it comes to fish, I think you'd have to poll the other end of the spectrum to find someone who calls every landlocked salmon a Kokanee.

  16. #16
    Member Zissou's Avatar
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    Fact: All Kokanee can be called landlocked salmon, but not all landlocked salmon can be called Kokanee.

  17. #17
    Member Salmon-Thirty-Salmon's Avatar
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    Always called a "landlocked sockeye" a Kokanee (it's what we had in MT). Called the fresh water salmon of the great lakes [planted] by their regular common names...kings, coho, etc. And the stocked silvers up here "landlocked silvers/coho".

    /shrug

    I also call it soda when I'm here [AK], pop in some places, and a 'coke' in select locations.

  18. #18
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    I put other as landlocked Sockeye I have always heard of as Kokanee, the rest were always Land Locked xxxxx except on the Great Lakes, we jsut called em Kings, Coho's or Pinkies and Atlantics.

  19. #19
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    im not sure why you would refer to many different species of salmon as "landlocked salmon" i would say whatever species landlocked or not the location doesn't change what kind of fish it is. however kokanee i believe is the proper term for a landlocked sockeye at least in Montana it was.

  20. #20
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjustinm View Post
    im not sure why you would refer to many different species of salmon as "landlocked salmon" i would say whatever species landlocked or not the location doesn't change what kind of fish it is. however kokanee i believe is the proper term for a landlocked sockeye at least in Montana it was.

    While the location does not change the species the seasons,limits and methods and means of harvest certainly do.
    We have a daily limit of one or two kings from our rivers depending on where they are caught and a defined season. Stocked kings in a lake have a limit of ten daily and no closed season there are also often bait restrictions etc.. Silvers are two per day in the river but 10 per day if caught from a stocked landlocked lake.
    If you said you just caught 10 silvers today or a king salmon in freshwater without stating they were stocked fish you would appear to have violated the law. At least until you clarified where you caught them.
    Some of our local lakes contain at least 2 species of landlocked salmon. Being the seasons, limits,methods and means are the same you can see why we may refer to them with the same name. For example we can catch 10 stocked kings and Silvers combined but the limit on rainbows and/or dollies are distinctly different at five per day.
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