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Thread: white pink king

  1. #1
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Default white pink king

    Landed a white, pink king and a hand full of chickens today, anyone really know why kings flesh is either white, red, pink or mixed like this one? some say its diet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakcombo View Post
    Landed a white, pink king and a hand full of chickens today, anyone really know why kings flesh is either white, red, pink or mixed like this one? some say its diet.
    It is because of that particular king's inability to produce the pigment that normally causes a salmon to be "salmon" colored. Here is a link to an interesting article about it: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...44&issue_id=43
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  3. #3
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Default thanks Muttley

    our catch is usually 50/50 this year its 70/30 leaning towards white.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakcombo View Post
    our catch is usually 50/50 this year its 70/30 leaning towards white.
    You're welcome. I have a friend that lived in Kodiak for a couple of years and he was an avid king fisherman. He once told me that about half the kings he ever caught were either white or "marbled" in color. I don't know if this is a scientific fact or not (on NO, I said the "s" word!!!), but I have heard that it is due to the genetic makeup of the kings that hang out around that area.

    What I've always wondered about is why it doesn't (or maybe it does) affect other salmon, too, or if it's just a king thing. I've never heard of anyone catching a "white" red, or silver, but if it's genetical then maybe it can affect other salmon, too. Anyone with any feedback on that?
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    The Fraser has a ton of whites in it. I don't know that there are many or any runs of whites sourced from rivers north of the AK panhandle.

  6. #6

    Default white pink king

    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    The Fraser has a ton of whites in it. I don't know that there are many or any runs of whites sourced from rivers north of the AK panhandle.
    Yeah if anyone has caught a white king in a river in Alaska, I would be interested to hear about it.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakcombo View Post
    ...or mixed like this one?
    Dunno, but when they're mixed they're just like yours- pink in back and white in front, sometimes with mottling at the transition.

    BTW- It appears that the whites have finally been discovered by the gourmet market. Friends in CA report it going for over $50/lb when available. Always wondered what happened to them once they left Alaska. Obviously I'm not shopping in the ritzy stores!

  8. #8

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    I would put this year's percentage at 45% white at the mouth if the Chilkat River. It seems that the percentage here is on the rise.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by cwm907 View Post
    Yeah if anyone has caught a white king in a river in Alaska, I would be interested to hear about it.
    Several years back, I caught a 37 lb white meat King in Sheep Creek up in the Mat Su Valley. I have talked to several others that have caught white meat Kings out of several Mat Su rivers.

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Back in the early 80's I used to work at a local salmon bake. Part of my duties were to help fillet and steak kings for the evening. I recall once seeing "zebra" striated fillet. Alternating red and white muscle bands in the longitudinal direction. Now how do you account for that?

  11. #11

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    L.G.
    The one you are refering to are called marbled. They are pretty common in southern southeast in the winter.

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    We used to see quite a few whites returning to the Crystal lake hatchery. I've hear the occurence of whites is higher among hatchery fish. I think the Stikine gets a good number of them, I've caught a few trolling near there.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  13. #13

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    alot of clipped fins are white, no doubt. An early spring, variegated (marbled), krill fed king is the best eating king..

  14. #14
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwm907 View Post
    Yeah if anyone has caught a white king in a river in Alaska, I would be interested to hear about it.
    I caught 2 Jack white kings on the upper Kasilof a few years back. they ended up being some of the best smoked salmon I ever made.
    My fiancee caught a white Kokanee this year on the lake. I believe the kokanees in this lake are silver salmon.
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  15. #15
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Default smoked red and white king

    The whites firmed up better than reds, reds got kinda mushy in the same brine.
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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    You're welcome. I have a friend that lived in Kodiak for a couple of years and he was an avid king fisherman. He once told me that about half the kings he ever caught were either white or "marbled" in color. I don't know if this is a scientific fact or not (on NO, I said the "s" word!!!), but I have heard that it is due to the genetic makeup of the kings that hang out around that area.

    What I've always wondered about is why it doesn't (or maybe it does) affect other salmon, too, or if it's just a king thing. I've never heard of anyone catching a "white" red, or silver, but if it's genetical then maybe it can affect other salmon, too. Anyone with any feedback on that?


    I'd be willing to bet it's a recessive gene that's only in that sub-species of salmon. I have no degree in genetics, and none of this is factually based, just my two cents (and I've been drinking)! But, consider the Labrador. There is a recessive gene in a chocolate labrador that makes it's coat look silver. Why doesn't this happen with Basset Hounds? I have no idea. It probably has something to do with a particular portion of the DNA which makes the fish a King rather than a Silver in the first place. However, in the King Salmon, it'd have to do specifically with the amount of escapement of white kings (rather than irresponsible breeders), which would be hard for us to determine. Just like the chocolate labs with the gene, if they're bred (irresponsibly) specifically for that, you can almost guarantee it'll happen. I don't know how to explain the frequency other than more white kings are making it all the way home. I'd venture to say, given statistics from this board, alone, and a severe lack of intelligence on the topic, otherwise, that more white kings are making it back to spawn in the southeast and Kodiak than up here; hence the 'abundance' of white kings in that area. I've had a little too much scotch to start making Punnett Squares, and I don't have the information needed, anyways (or factually based information proving that my theory is even sane). So, that's my thought on the situation given my limited studies in both fisheries and zoology.**



    **This statement is fueled by Scotch and should, in no way, be taken seriously, factually, or even logically. My most sincere apologies to those who have read it and then scratched their head!

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    I caught 2 Jack white kings on the upper Kasilof a few years back. they ended up being some of the best smoked salmon I ever made.
    My fiancee caught a white Kokanee this year on the lake. I believe the kokanees in this lake are silver salmon.
    Uhhh, not to start a pissing match, as I'm sure someone will claim here, but if it is a silver salmon it is a silver salmon. A kokanee is a landlocked sockeye by definition (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sockeye_salmon).
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    Passing along a fact or making a correction ain't peeing, Mutt.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    Passing along a fact or making a correction ain't peeing, Mutt.
    LOL! Some people here seem to think so. I won't name any names, but I get accused of it just about every time I do correct someone. Just tryin' to head off the posse before it overtook me.
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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by DucksAndDogs View Post
    I'd be willing to bet it's a recessive gene that's only in that sub-species of salmon. I have no degree in genetics, and none of this is factually based, just my two cents (and I've been drinking)! But, consider the Labrador. There is a recessive gene in a chocolate labrador that makes it's coat look silver. Why doesn't this happen with Basset Hounds? I have no idea. It probably has something to do with a particular portion of the DNA which makes the fish a King rather than a Silver in the first place. However, in the King Salmon, it'd have to do specifically with the amount of escapement of white kings (rather than irresponsible breeders), which would be hard for us to determine. Just like the chocolate labs with the gene, if they're bred (irresponsibly) specifically for that, you can almost guarantee it'll happen. I don't know how to explain the frequency other than more white kings are making it all the way home. I'd venture to say, given statistics from this board, alone, and a severe lack of intelligence on the topic, otherwise, that more white kings are making it back to spawn in the southeast and Kodiak than up here; hence the 'abundance' of white kings in that area. I've had a little too much scotch to start making Punnett Squares, and I don't have the information needed, anyways (or factually based information proving that my theory is even sane). So, that's my thought on the situation given my limited studies in both fisheries and zoology.**



    **This statement is fueled by Scotch and should, in no way, be taken seriously, factually, or even logically. My most sincere apologies to those who have read it and then scratched their head!
    What if it's not my head I'm scratching!? I do like the recessive gene theory, though. We'll have to discuss that when we go out next time.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

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