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Thread: Stove Chimney Question

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    Member Redlander's Avatar
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    Question Stove Chimney Question

    We've got a wood stove in our cabin, and the chimney is angled out the side of the building. I'm planning on finishing the roof in a couple of weeks. Should I keep the chimney as is or take it up through the ceiling and roof? You can see it in the upper left hand area of the photo with a pot covering the end.

    AlaskaJune2012 088 e.jpg

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    First of all is this cabin in texas or Alaska? For sure you do not want to leave it the way you have it now. If in Texas you could go up from your stove. If in Alaska you would want to try to get it as close as possible ti the ridge line of roof. Even then you would want to install a cricket ( this is a deflector to keep the snow from taking your pipe off of the roof. The way it is now you stand a good chance of having smoke and carbon monoxide getting into the cabi up through the eves.

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    It's in Alaska up on the Yentna. And, the pipe has an extension that gets the end about 4 ft out from the eve. It's sort of just been thrown in there right now which is why I'm seeking advice. I don't guess I'd considered moving the stove, but I might.

    I think the previous owner made it so he could take the extension off when he wasn't there and it would be out of the way of snow coming off the roof.

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    Default Stove Chimney Question

    I wouldn't leave it as is. I'm a believer that straight chimneys are the best, because they are. If you are going to Tee it outside, which really is not a good plan but sometimes needs to be done, then do it immediately so that the smoke passes through the Tee while still hot.
    Ideally though you should send it straight up. Any reason not to?

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    If it was me I'd go up through the roof as well. Big elbows have a tendency to cause more creosote buildup there when you try and turn your stove down a lot.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    go straight up I honestly dont even see how the stove drafts with the pipe like that the only advantage I could possibly come up with is that it would be easier to clean the stack but thats a stretch. The creosote build up on that must be pretty big. Im hoping that tarp is temporary as well for clearance to combustibles or else I see a fire in your near future. Better to be safe than sorry.

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    Yeah, what those other guys said. Put it four feet above the ridge line so it will catch a draft and be high enough out of the snow. Crickets are popular for those who choose metal roofs. But for a stack near the ridge (and on such a shallow pitch) there is little chance of a heavy snow load coming like a freight train into the side of the stack. Now, putting it up as close to the ridge as can be allowed for combustion clearences and to still manage a full run of shingles or two above the jack (or boot as it can be called) will require so different hardware. You need two pipes with the ends flattened out (like 1 inch stuff) screwed to the pipe below the spark arrestor and down to brackets on the roof. These will keep wind and snow from knocking over a free-standing four foot pipe.

    Also, moving the chimney to the ridge line will propbaly relocate your stove closer to the center of the cabin, which is a more efficent way to heat with wood. I am assuming right now it is on exterior wall.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redlander View Post
    We've got a wood stove in our cabin, and the chimney is angled out the side of the building. I'm planning on finishing the roof in a couple of weeks. Should I keep the chimney as is or take it up through the ceiling and roof? You can see it in the upper left hand area of the photo with a pot covering the end.






    AlaskaJune2012 088 e.jpg
    Redlander,

    Your chimney should definitely penetrate the roof at the highest practical point with the least number of elbows or bends possible. If your stove has the option to vent out the top rather than the side, choose the top. That would allow the ideal installation of a vertical run with no bends.

    Your advantages would be: better drafting, easy cleaning, and more heat extraction.

    Use black stove pipe from the stove until several feet below the ceiling. The black stove pipe will radiate heat into your cabinís interior. It is also cheaper than insulated stainless chimney sections. The stainless steel insulated chimney is intended to safely make the penetration. Several black pipe sections plus a telescoping two-piece black stove pipe assembly makes installation easy.

    The telescoping section also makes disassembly for cleaning easy. Just disconnect from the stove, retract slightly, and tape a trash bag to the bottom of the stove pipe. Then take off the chimney cap, and run a brush through while standing on the roof.

    Two support struts like SpotGrouse says will make a sturdy wind-proof installation. The struts should be angled downward from the chimney at about a 45 degree angle. They should attach to the roof at or near the ridge line, and project outward from the chimney about 90 degrees from one another.

    Follow the manufacturerís instructions for clearance to combustibles when installing stove pipe and chimney sections.

    Since youíre working on your roof, itís a great opportunity to get it done properly!

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    I was in this business for many years outside, the only thing i would add to the above. Closer to the ridge line the chimney comes out will be less SS HT pipe required. Makes it a bit cheaper to install. Home depot sells the kits now, and install before you put your roof on for sure. If you are doing a metal roof it is much easier to install than after you have the roof on and less likely to leak later. Put the standoff supports on the ridge side of the chimney and if you do not install a chase put a cricket in to protect flashing and rain collar.

    Sweepint
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    Might not be an option at this point, but think about moving 90 degrees to one of the walls opposite the roof slope. You could go out with an angle, put a T-cleanout piece at the bottom and then run the pipe up higher than the ridge. That's how my place is set, and for a weekend user I usually sweep a minimal build-up out once a year. Draft and stove performance have been fine. When I chimney sweep, if I get my arm dirty, I can reach up through the cleanout T and brush the horizontal piece coming from inside the cabin. Or, take off a piece and run the brush from the inside out. When my roof snow slides, I never worry about the crickets or any other leak opportunities.

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    On a side note, is that tree stump intended to be structural?! I'd give that only a couple more years before it goes out on you if so.

    In my cabin, the stove is off to the side for floor space reasons, but I have a 45, followed by 3' then a 45 which ties into the stainless triple wall which vertically exits the roof near the peak. I will eventually upgrade the interior single wall with triple wall, since it radiates too much heat to the upstairs, and I also want to keep the smoke hotter inside, since, as others stated, angles collect creosote.

    Also remember the rule, 2' above a ten foot circle when it come to your vertical height above roofline.

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    [QUOTE=Akheloce;1164043]On a side note, is that tree stump intended to be structural?! I'd give that only a couple more years before it goes out on you if so.QUOTE]

    Well the stump was, but it's gone now. We just bought the place this past year, so it is sort of a fixer-upper/needs finishing type thing. I spent three days of my vacation and trip to the cabin in July replacing the entire foundation for the front 10'x10' section of the cabin as best that I could given time and materials constraints. The previous owner did leave some 12"x12" posts there which I was able to use. More work upcoming, including the roof and outhouse.

    Being only 10'x26', I may move the stove to one end to leave floor space and run the pipe either up through the ceiling and roof or out and up the back wall.

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    Wow. The risk manager in me says don't sleep in this cabin without 2 CO2 detectors installed.

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    I do have one more thing to add. Put the stove pipe joints small end down so all leakeage stays inside the pipe and down into the stove. Seems like a no brainer but the place I bought was settup just backwrds and always made a big mess down the pipe and all over the stove. Ron.

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    Thanks for all of the advice. We've got a lot of new material hauled in, including new chimney pipe, but because of weather and boat problems, didn't get the stove or roof project completed this year. Hopefully next spring will allow us time to finish it off. I have decided on the through the ceiling/roof option near the ridgeline.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redlander View Post
    Thanks for all of the advice. We've got a lot of new material hauled in, including new chimney pipe, but because of weather and boat problems, didn't get the stove or roof project completed this year. Hopefully next spring will allow us time to finish it off. I have decided on the through the ceiling/roof option near the ridgeline.
    It doesn't really have to be near the ridge, but it definitely DOES have to extend 2' above that ridge to draw properly in any sort of wind - - - or no wind at all. I haven't seen any posts that refer to chimney "dampers" here, but you should install one certainly. If the chimney (stove pipe sections) draw well (and that's the reason to keep the cap 2' above the ridge), the chance of CO buildup is somewhere between little to none.

    I presume that the roof penetration will be made with a "roof jack". That assembly will keep the heat source (stack) a minimun of 2" from any wood roof or wall members. Waterproof (seal) well around the stack, whether a wall or roof penetration.

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    I'm going to put it close to the ridge because of the snow, and because I don't want to have so much pipe up in the air. Last year they got over 90 inches. I am going to use Roof Jack Vent Pipe Flashing, but we have also bought triple wall pipe to go from the ceiling up through the roof. If we have enough, we are going to use double wall from the stove to ceiling. I got one of those ceiling jacks for the clearance in the ceiling. We spent several hundred $ on the pipe, etc. The stove itself has a damper in it, right where the stove pipe joins.

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    If you have the clearance around the stove pipe you will be better to use single wall pipe until you get closer to the roof. The object of the stove is heat and a insulated pipe will send more of your heat out the chimney and less into the room. You will want angle bracing for the pipe that is above the roof. Even though you will be close to the peak of the roof you will want to add a good sharp peaked cricket above the pipe as that will help take some of the pressure off of the pipe.

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    What do you guys mean when you use the word "cricket"? It's usually a design element that directs the flow of water . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 2 View Post
    What do you guys mean when you use the word "cricket"? It's usually a design element that directs the flow of water . . .
    Snow diverter. So snow doesn't load and break the pipe. V bent triangle mounted above the pipe.

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